Articles Tagged with: women’s hair loss
4 Reasons Behind Female Hair Loss

4 Reasons Behind Female Hair Loss

For decades, stand-up comedians have joked about the many differences between men and women. But it’s doubtful that they would get any laughs if they started riffing about female hair loss. While many cases of hair loss in women arise for the same reasons they do in men, such as stress or genetic predisposition, the distinct nature of female biology and life changes are behind a significant proportion of female hair loss problems.

While you will need a professional diagnosis by a hair restoration physician to determine the exact cause of your hair loss, it is likely that if you are noticing an increase in hair shedding or thinning areas on your scalp, it is due to one of these common reasons behind female hair loss:

Menopause

Women going through menopause produce lower levels of estrogen and progesterone – two hormones critical for hair growth and follicle health. As these hormone levels decrease, hair growth slows while follicles become thin, brittle, and more vulnerable to damage.

Making matters worse, the decrease in hair-promoting hormones is accompanied by an increase in androgens – hormones that trigger follicle miniaturization on the scalp. This makes hair more susceptible to falling out.

The hormonal fluctuations of menopause also contribute to other mental and emotional conditions and lifestyle changes, which themselves can cause hair loss. These can include:

  • Stress
  • Emotional decline due to diminished self-confidence
  • Lack of exercise
  • Imbalanced nutrition
  • Dehydration
  • Damaging hairstyles
  • Medication

Pregnancy

Pregnancy causes wild fluctuations in hormones, as every mom knows. But these hormonal upheavals don’t end after delivery. The months that follow childbirth also see dramatic changes in hormone levels as the body works its way back to its normal state. This hormonal whiplash can take a toll on hair as well. 

Many women notice that their hair seems thicker and fuller during pregnancy than it did beforehand. This is because of elevated estrogen levels that increase the percentage of hairs in the growth cycle while simultaneously freezing hair in the resting phase of hair growth. After pregnancy, estrogen levels fall dramatically, and all the hair that was growing so impressively starts to fall out. While we all shed hair regularly, at a rate of around 80 hairs per day, the extent of postpartum shedding can raise that number to closer to 400 hairs a day.

The good news is that this type of hair loss is almost always temporary, and hair growth will return to normal in short order.

Traction Alopecia

If you apply constant tension to your hair follicles, you will damage, weaken, and ultimately kill them. This is called traction alopecia, and it affects women who wear certain types of hairstyles or engage in other destructive habits.

The five primary causes of traction alopecia are:

  1. Wearing unnecessarily tight ponytails, pigtails, or braids for extended periods.
  2. Trichotillomania, a psychological condition characterized by constant (and often unconscious) hair twisting, pulling, or plucking.
  3. Hairstyles in which hair is tightly wound for a prolonged period.
  4. Hairpieces and weaves that are affixed/clipped to the hair.

Anemia

Anemia involves an insufficient amount of iron in the blood and is one of the most common causes of dietary-related hair loss in women. Low iron levels restrict proper blood flow and reduce the amount of growth-stimulating nutrients that hair follicles need. Changes in diet and iron supplements can help, including eating foods such as spinach, kale, broccoli, and other leafy greens.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Ludwig Classification

The 4 Most Common Hair Loss Conditions

Ludwig ClassificationHair loss conditions do not discriminate. Despite how often we hear about male pattern baldness, women account for 40 percent of cases. Overall, 3 million Americans suffer from androgenetic alopecia, or hereditary hair loss, annually.

According to the American Hair Loss Association, approximately 95 percent of men’s hair loss is due to male pattern baldness, and 25 percent see symptoms before they reach 21-years-old.¹ Two-thirds of men experience some degree of loss by the age of 35. And by the time they hit 50, 85 percent of men see significant thinning related to androgenetic alopecia.

Meanwhile, half of all women experience thinning or shedding by the time they reach 50-years-old, per the North American Hair Research Society.² While female pattern hair loss (FHPL) can begin any time after puberty, most women either see thinning in their teens and 20s or in their 40s and 50s.

The medical community continues to work toward cutting edge treatments that satisfy each of the leading hair loss conditions, but it’s important to remember how much these disorders vary. Not only are men and women affected differently, but another three major hair loss conditions exist beyond androgenetic alopecia.

Alopecia Areata

Around 200,000 cases of alopecia areata are diagnosed per year. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder characterized as sudden bald patches that appear almost overnight, sometimes resulting in complete bodily hair loss. Although there is no cure for alopecia areata, patients are wise to address any underlying conditions related to their immune systems. Topical treatments can also help alleviate some of the hair loss associated with alopecia.  

Telogen Effluvium

Another leading hair loss type is telogen effluvium (TE), or stress-induced hair loss, which affects around 200,000 people in the United States per year alone. After a strenuous life event, hair follicles react to external strain by going into shock. While normal hairs enter their active and resting phase on a continuous cycle, patients with telogen effluvium have follicles pushed into their resting state prematurely. A few weeks or months later, patients may notice their hair falling out in clumps because the follicles aren’t active to reproduce recurrently lost hairs. Fortunately, telogen effluvium is a reversible condition that rarely requires aggressive medical intervention. However, TE can become a chronic ailment if the underlying causes of stress aren’t addressed properly. Chronic telogen effluvium most often affects women between 30- and 60-years old, per the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology.³ However, patients rarely see total hair loss during these fluctuating periods of on-and-off symptoms.

Traction Alopecia

Traction alopecia occurs when hairs are externally pulled out of the follicle from tight hairstyles or as an active response to anxiety or depression. Cornrows, tight braids and hair pieces can trigger traction alopecia symptoms, which then subside when hair is loosened and follicles begin to heal. For individuals suffering with mental disorders such as depression, a combination of therapy and counseling can provide a new outlet to minimize purposeful traction alopecia and other self-harm behaviors.

 

If you are experiencing symptoms of hair loss beyond the normal 50 to 100 strands per day, it’s time to contact a hair restoration specialist. At your consultation, Dr. Paul Rose and Dr. Bernard Nusbaum of the renowned Hair Transplant Institute of Miami will examine you for the common hair loss conditions. From there, we discuss possible underlying causes and recommend treatment, if necessary. As a leading hair loss clinic, we pride ourselves on active listening, open communication and optimal treatment plans. Call us today at 305-925-0222 to schedule your appointment.

 

¹ http://www.americanhairloss.org/men_hair_loss/

² http://www.nahrs.org/PatientInformation(FAQs)/FemalePatternHairLoss(FAQ).aspx

³ http://www.aocd.org/?page=TelogenEffluviumHA

female hair loss

The Emotional Toll of Female Hair Loss

female hair lossAlmost 40 percent of all hair loss sufferers are women. Despite the astounding statistics, male pattern baldness is more commonly discussed – and aesthetically accepted – than female hair loss. Famous actors like Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Vin Diesel make balding look fashionable. Women, on the other hand, rarely opt to shave their scalps, even while suffering with thinning or shedding locks. Instead, female hair loss sufferers are left with widening parts, limp locks and a diminished sense of self-confidence.

Men who suffer from hair loss can certainly suffer a blow to their self-esteem. For women, who often favor long and thick hairstyles, hair loss adds further psychological and emotional damage. Hopefully, better education and widespread discussion can normalize female hair loss and help patients find comfort in knowing they aren’t alone – and that treatment is available.

How Does Female Hair Loss Occur?

Female hair loss due to androgenic alopecia transpires due to the miniaturization of hair follicles, which causes strands to appear shorter, thinner or more delicate and prone to breakage. Over time, miniaturization encourages hair follicles to discontinue production, thus limiting the overall active follicle count on the scalp. Genetic hair loss in women rarely results in total baldness. Women who suffer from total baldness may have alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder, or chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, female pattern hair loss (FPHL) affects roughly 30 million American women. Female pattern baldness is the most prevalent cause of progressive hair loss in women. The symptoms of FPHL are a widening part and thinning crown, generally differing from the receding hairline seen in male patients.

Like male pattern baldness, female hair loss is understood to be a genetically predetermined condition. But, other risk factors include the following:

Underlying Illness

Lupus, anemia, diabetes, ringworm, polycystic ovary syndrome and thyroid dysfunction are all commonly associated with hair loss, which is why visiting a hair loss specialist or physician to diagnose your condition is critical. Hair loss is often the first sign of a more serious illness, so ruling out other motivating medical conditions helps physicians determine ideal treatment options while minimizing further health damage. 

Menopause, Pregnancy or Post-Partum

Hair loss due to aging can worsen with menopause, particularly when considering the massive hormonal changes during the change of life. Estrogen levels fall during menopause around age 50, frequently manifesting as thinning or shedding on the scalp. Similarly, women who are pregnant or who have just given birth might experience hair loss due to hormonal shifts.

Stress

After a traumatic event like a death in the family or job loss, hair loss is common. When your body undergoes severe emotional shock, normal functions like hair growth are put on the back burner. In fact, serious distress “shocks” follicles into a resting state, which means they aren’t active to produce replacement strands after ordinary shedding. Stress-induced hair loss is known as telogen effluvium (TE) and can resolve itself, assuming anxiety and tension dissipates. 

Poor Nutrition

Eating too little to lose weight fast often means you miss out on key nutrients that keep the body functioning. Hair follicles require proper nutrition to function, and eliminating these from your diet can harm the growth cycle. If you see hair loss while dieting, consult a nutritionist to review your caloric needs, current intake and dietary recommendations.

 

Women’s hair loss is treatable. Early detection helps increase your odds of reversing follicle miniaturization and regaining a healthy, full head of hair. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, patients suffering from female hair loss can undergo both low-level laser therapy or hair restoration surgery, depending on individual candidacy and hair loss patterns. To schedule a consultation to diagnose your hair loss condition and move forward with treatment, reach out to us at 305-925-0222.

women's hair loss

Coping with Female Hair Loss During the Holidays

Short-term hair loss solutionsThe holidays are the most joyous time of year – right? Unfortunately for those suffering from female hair loss, December’s festivities are flooded with feelings of discomfort and anxiety. When you’re a woman suffering from female hair loss, your initial reaction is to hide. And during one of the most social seasons of the year, coping with female hair loss is anything but easy.

Roughly 20 million women in the United States suffer some sort of hair loss condition, whether it be androgenic alopecia, telogen effluvium, anagen effluvium due to chemotherapy, traction alopecia or alopecia areata. While the statistics are staggering, knowing you aren’t alone in this journey can help ease your woes. In addition to finding outside support via other hair loss patients or a highly-experienced hair loss specialist, consider the following four tips to cope with female hair loss this holiday season:

Don’t Go into Hiding

Female hair loss is not your fault; nor should you be forced to suffer any more than necessary. Isolating yourself to hide the symptoms of hair loss is only going to make you feel worse in the long run. Memories created around the holidays are not something you want to miss out on, if possible. While it’s not easy to hide your self-consciousness in a social situation, letting go and having fun are the best distractions during an emotionally dim period. Spending time around others who love you for you helps boost lost self-confidence. Plus, cancelling left and right is bound to bring on inevitable guilt. Imagine coming up with several bogus excuses each time you feel forced to decline a holiday invitation. The stress of getting caught in a lie or suffering a serious case of FOMO (fear of missing out) is far worse than your changed appearance.

Spend Time on Yourself

The stress of getting ready in a rush is far worse for women who have thinning hair or balding to conceal. Adopting a new hair-do is exciting assuming you have the time to practice and style your locks to your liking. Make time for grooming and styling before a big event and remember – practice is key! For women with androgenic alopecia, or diffuse thinning, a deep-swept side part can do wonders to conceal a widening middle part. Visit your hair stylist for a bang trim to capture a chicer look. Framing your face with beachy waves helps hair look fuller, so make sure you have a working curling iron or wand by your side.

For a thicker up-do, consider a high boosted bun with assistance from your wardrobe. First, cut the foot off a high sock (preferably washed or unused) and roll it into a doughnut shape. With your hair in a high pony, place the sock at the end of your strands and slowly roll down so strands completely cover the sock. If you are concerned about thinning around the scalp on display, complete the look with an embellished hair band or festive holiday ribbon.

If you’re hair loss is more obvious to the point of balding or patchy loss, invest in a well-made wig. Wigs are popular among celebrities like Kylie Jenner who don’t suffer from hair loss, so the shopping process is nothing to be ashamed of. Buying a wig online is an option, but the fitting and style is more difficult to determine without trying it on first. If you do decide to shop online for a wig, leave yourself ample time for returns. In addition, hair wraps and hats are both stylish and holiday appropriate. Wear a beautiful, elegant silk scarf in a traditional holiday color or don a cute Santa hat as a nod to the big jolly man himself.  

Consider a Long-Term Solution

Some hair loss cases, including telogen effluvium, are temporary due to a traumatic event or sudden lifestyle change. However, many hair loss cases are genetic or prolonged. While tips and tricks for disguising hair loss work in the short-term, you can’t fake it forever. Considering hair loss restoration may be critical. Visit a qualified hair loss physician or specialist who can diagnose your hair loss condition and rule out any other medical concerns. From there, you’ll receive treatment recommendations based on your lifestyle and objectives. Many female hair loss patients opt for a non-invasive treatment therapy, such as a laser cap for hair loss, natural-looking hair loss surgery or a combination of the two. Whichever treatment(s) you decide to undergo, give yourself the gift of self-confidence for the holidays.

 

Female Hair Loss Treatment in Miami

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, our primary goal is to bring relief and comfort to hair loss patients. We offer consultations to diagnose cases and rule out underlying conditions before prescribing personalized treatment programs, all with compassion and honesty at the forefront of our practice. Miami’s top hair loss physicians, Dr. Bernard Nusbaum and Dr. Paul Rose, each offer decades of experience coupled with extensive research, cutting-edge technologies and highly satisfied patients. The Hair Transplant Institute of Miami is no. 1 in total Artas® Robotic Hair Transplant procedures in both Miami and the Southeast region, and among the top five nationwide. To get started on your hair restoration journey at our leading Miami hair clinic, contact us directly at 305-925-0222.

 

Happy Holidays!

Teens and Hair Loss- The Top 7 Causes

High-Risk Hair Styles for Women

High-Risk Hairstyles for WomenDo you ever feel that wearing your hair too tight is pulling on your delicate strands? A study from the John Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore shows that a strong association exists between overly tight hairstyles that lead to scalp tension and eventually, a hair loss condition called traction alopecia.

Traction alopecia occurs in a few different ways. Trichotillomania, an emotional disorder that leads to unwanted to unconscious hair plucking and pulling, is a common cause. Helmets, too, used for sports and physical activity, are a leading culprit behind the hair-loss condition. In addition, when someone wears their hair too tight for prolonged periods of time, they expose themselves to traction alopecia. Sometimes, thinning and balding become increasingly obvious when the hair is pulled, twisted or over-styled for a prolonged period of time.

Review these hairstyles to avoid if you’ve been diagnosed with traction alopecia:

  • Excessively tight ponytails or braids
  • Dreadlocks
  • Hair extensions
  • Thermal straightening
  • Permanent weaving
  • Wigs

Each of these styles varies in degree of risk, but the John Hopkins research shows traction alopecia is aggravated when tight styles are applied to hair treated with chemical straightening agents or “relaxed” hair. In addition, blow drying and flat irons can weaken strands, but are less likely to cause significant hair loss as compared to the combinations above. To prevent traction alopecia from hairstyles, John Hopkins says braids should be let loose after three months. In addition, weaves and extensions should never be in place for longer than eight weeks. The less time with high-risk styles, the greater chance an individual reduces the threat of developing traction alopecia.

In order to treat traction alopecia, Miami Hair recommends both low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and FUE hair transplants. LLLT caps use FDA-approved lasers to stimulate blood flow and revive dormant hair follicles, promoting natural hair growth. When used after eliminating high-risk hair styles from your life, you can better the odds of regrowth after damage. However, the most effective process in restoring hair after damage is through hair restoration surgery. Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) transplants individual follicular units to fill-in balding areas precisely, creating natural-looking and aesthetically pleasing results.

Nearly two-thirds of men suffer with hair loss, and one out of every four women face thinning or shedding hair. Schedule a consultation by contacting our office so you can discuss how to lessen the effects of and treat traction alopecia or other hair loss conditions.

 

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