Articles Tagged with: traction alopecia
prevent male pattern baldness

Types of Alopecia

Androgenetic alopecia – also called pattern baldness – is by far the most common cause of hair loss in men and women alike. But it is far from the only reason your hair may be thinning or falling out. Millions of Americans suffer from hair loss caused by other forms of alopecia every year. While each type of alopecia has its own causes and impacts, they all lead to the same disappointing and embarrassing issues inherent with losing your hair.

Here is what you need to know about some of the most common types of alopecia.

Androgenetic Alopecia

If your hair is thinning or falling out, the odds are pretty good that androgenetic alopecia is the culprit. Over 95% of hair loss cases are related to this hereditary hair loss condition that affects over three million Americans annually. Androgenetic alopecia causes hair miniaturization, where hair becomes thinner and finer each time it goes through the growth cycle. Eventually, these hairs cease to grow entirely and fall out.

Men are more likely to experience and notice androgenetic alopecia earlier than women, with 25 percent of American males seeing symptoms before age 21, approximately 66 percent of men showing some degree of loss by the age of 35, and 85 percent of men see significant thinning by age 50. Most women, however, do not notice or see any signs of thinning or balding hair until the age of 50 or 60.  

Alopecia Areata

This hair loss condition is caused by a direct attack on hair follicles by your own immune system and white blood cells. This assault causes the follicles to shrink and subsequently slow down hair production. In turn, this leads to sudden hair loss in quarter-sized patches which can progress across the scalp rapidly and unpredictably.

More extreme versions of the condition include alopecia totalis (Complete loss of hair on the scalp) and alopecia universalis (total loss of hair on the scalp and body). Hair follicles are not destroyed by alopecia areata and can typically regrow as soon as the inflammation dwindles.

Though not as common as androgenetic alopecia, which is the culprit in the vast majority of male pattern baldness cases, alopecia areata still affects two percent of Americans or roughly 6.8 million people. Unlike hereditary hair loss, which generally manifests later in life, alopecia areata typically occurs before the age of 30 and can sometimes be seen in children as young as two years old.

Researchers haven’t yet figured out the specific reason why the immune system would suddenly turn on hair follicles. However, there appears to be a strong genetic connection. Several studies have found that alopecia areata is far more common (1 out of 5) in people who have a close family member with the condition.

Traction Alopecia

If you apply constant tension to your hair follicles, they will eventually experience damage, weaken, and ultimately die and fall out. This is called traction alopecia.

The five primary causes of traction alopecia are:

  1. Wearing unnecessarily tight pigtails, ponytails, or braids for extended periods.
  2. Trichotillomania, a psychological disorder characterized by constant (and often unconscious) hair twisting, plucking, or pulling.
  3. Hairstyles that require hair to be tightly wound for a prolonged period.
  4. Hairpieces and weaves that must be affixed/clipped to the hair.
  5. Helmets, particularly compression-helmets like those worn while playing football, snowboarding, skiing, horseback riding, etc.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

notice hair loss

3 Steps to Take When You First Notice Hair Loss

notice hair lossWhen you first notice hair loss, you probably won’t have a receding hairline or thinning crown just yet. While these are characteristic symptoms of male pattern baldness – medically known as androgenic alopecia, or hereditary hair loss – progression doesn’t appear overnight. First, you may notice excessive amounts of hair stuck to your pillowcase or scattered across the floor of your shower. So, what do you do when these indications transpire?

First, stress may only make your situation worse. Chronic anxiety is linked with a hair loss condition called telogen effluvium (TE). Any persistent or ongoing mental anguish – perhaps caused by a change in your appearance – could further aggravate an existing hair loss condition.

When the initial signs of balding are recognized, remain calm and follow these three steps.

1. Contact a Hair Loss Doctor

The sooner you start hair loss treatment after you first notice hair loss, the easier it is to restore follicles with non-invasive solutions such as Minoxidil topical foams and/or low-level laser therapy caps. Male-pattern baldness is often caused by a process called follicle miniaturization, by which an overabundance of a testosterone byproduct called dihydrotestosterone (DHT) interferes with healthy follicle function. Over time, DHT causes hair follicles to shrink to the point where they are unable to sustain normal growth. When these follicles stop growing, hair ceases to grow and balding becomes apparent. Visiting a hair loss doctor for a comprehensive hair loss evaluation and diagnosis early on is highly recommended. A formal diagnosis will also rule out any underlying medical conditions or illnesses that could, theoretically, contribute to your hair loss.

2. Understand Your Condition

Hair loss is different for everyone and there’s more than one type of hair loss to consider when you first notice hair loss.

Androgenic alopecia is the most predominant, affecting around 85 percent of men and approximately half of all women by the age of 50.

Although the exact statistics are unknown, the presumed second most prevalent type of hair loss is telogen effluvium (TE), a (typically) temporary hair loss condition caused by emotional trauma or nutritional deficiencies.

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder that results in sudden, noticeable bald patches across the scalp and, sometimes, the face and/or body. Around 200,000 cases of alopecia areata are diagnosed every year.

Traction alopecia is occasionally caused by purposeful external pulling. Actively pulling out hairs can be a response to anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), depression or other mental health issues. Certain hair accessories or constricting hairstyles can also lead to inadvertent hair loss classified under traction alopecia.

3. Consider Your Options

Between laser therapy caps, stem cell treatments, hair transplant surgery and topical or oral medications, hair loss patients have many treatment methods to evaluate. Fortunately, an expert hair loss specialist offers professional guidance and recommendations for optimal results based on your hair loss type, lifestyle and budget.

Even so, there are a few things to consider before you invest your money into any one treatment after you first notice hair loss, especially if you choose to manage it on your own. Non-invasive therapies like low-level laser therapy (LLLT) work on their own before hair follicles are fully inactive. After miniaturization is complete, hair restoration surgery helps fully transplant and replace nonfunctioning follicles to support healthy regrowth. Before or after surgery, topical treatments can be used to foster a healthier environment on the scalp and encourage optimal hair transplant results. Fortunately, hair transplants have undergone drastic and positive shifts over the last few decades. Expert physicians like Dr. Paul Rose and Dr. Bernard Nusbaum have the experience, research and technology to deliver natural-looking hair transplants with minimal scarring.

In some circumstances, lifestyle changes can help your hair grow back, but only if you suffer from non-genetic hair loss conditions such as telogen effluvium or traction alopecia. With the former, hair loss may be triggered by lack of proper nutrition or chronic stress, and the best solution would be to improve your diet or visit a mental health counselor. Traction alopecia is a hair loss condition caused by physical trauma, often related to hair accessories and extensions, and removing these from your routine is likely to improve such conditions dramatically. Even so, damage to the follicles may be permanent, so prevention and awareness are crucial.

To schedule your consultation and hair loss diagnosis, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami at 305-925-0222 or book an appointment using our online scheduling form.

Ludwig Classification

The 4 Most Common Hair Loss Conditions

Ludwig ClassificationHair loss conditions do not discriminate. Despite how often we hear about male pattern baldness, women account for 40 percent of cases. Overall, 3 million Americans suffer from androgenetic alopecia, or hereditary hair loss, annually.

According to the American Hair Loss Association, approximately 95 percent of men’s hair loss is due to male pattern baldness, and 25 percent see symptoms before they reach 21-years-old.¹ Two-thirds of men experience some degree of loss by the age of 35. And by the time they hit 50, 85 percent of men see significant thinning related to androgenetic alopecia.

Meanwhile, half of all women experience thinning or shedding by the time they reach 50-years-old, per the North American Hair Research Society.² While female pattern hair loss (FHPL) can begin any time after puberty, most women either see thinning in their teens and 20s or in their 40s and 50s.

The medical community continues to work toward cutting edge treatments that satisfy each of the leading hair loss conditions, but it’s important to remember how much these disorders vary. Not only are men and women affected differently, but another three major hair loss conditions exist beyond androgenetic alopecia.

Alopecia Areata

Around 200,000 cases of alopecia areata are diagnosed per year. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder characterized as sudden bald patches that appear almost overnight, sometimes resulting in complete bodily hair loss. Although there is no cure for alopecia areata, patients are wise to address any underlying conditions related to their immune systems. Topical treatments can also help alleviate some of the hair loss associated with alopecia.  

Telogen Effluvium

Another leading hair loss type is telogen effluvium (TE), or stress-induced hair loss, which affects around 200,000 people in the United States per year alone. After a strenuous life event, hair follicles react to external strain by going into shock. While normal hairs enter their active and resting phase on a continuous cycle, patients with telogen effluvium have follicles pushed into their resting state prematurely. A few weeks or months later, patients may notice their hair falling out in clumps because the follicles aren’t active to reproduce recurrently lost hairs. Fortunately, telogen effluvium is a reversible condition that rarely requires aggressive medical intervention. However, TE can become a chronic ailment if the underlying causes of stress aren’t addressed properly. Chronic telogen effluvium most often affects women between 30- and 60-years old, per the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology.³ However, patients rarely see total hair loss during these fluctuating periods of on-and-off symptoms.

Traction Alopecia

Traction alopecia occurs when hairs are externally pulled out of the follicle from tight hairstyles or as an active response to anxiety or depression. Cornrows, tight braids and hair pieces can trigger traction alopecia symptoms, which then subside when hair is loosened and follicles begin to heal. For individuals suffering with mental disorders such as depression, a combination of therapy and counseling can provide a new outlet to minimize purposeful traction alopecia and other self-harm behaviors.

 

If you are experiencing symptoms of hair loss beyond the normal 50 to 100 strands per day, it’s time to contact a hair restoration specialist. At your consultation, Dr. Paul Rose and Dr. Bernard Nusbaum of the renowned Hair Transplant Institute of Miami will examine you for the common hair loss conditions. From there, we discuss possible underlying causes and recommend treatment, if necessary. As a leading hair loss clinic, we pride ourselves on active listening, open communication and optimal treatment plans. Call us today at 305-925-0222 to schedule your appointment.

 

¹ http://www.americanhairloss.org/men_hair_loss/

² http://www.nahrs.org/PatientInformation(FAQs)/FemalePatternHairLoss(FAQ).aspx

³ http://www.aocd.org/?page=TelogenEffluviumHA

Why Does the Man Bun Cause Hair Loss?

Why Does the Man Bun Cause Hair Loss?The Man Bun is one of the biggest men’s hair trends of 2015. Along with Movember-inspired facial hair, the Man Bun has become a trademark for young, hip men looking to embrace an au natural image. Now, physicians warn that the popular hair style might actually harm men’s hair, causing minor to moderate hair loss after just a few months of wear.

Proponents of the Man Bun are confused. Why would this hair style cause hair loss among the men who wear it so proudly? After all, the Man Bun has turned into a modern symbol of virility and holistic health among some social circles.

Traction Alopecia

The answer is simple: Traction alopecia. This is a specific type of hair loss that is the result of prolonged pressure and tension being placed on the hair or scalp. Traction alopecia is also seen amongst women who wear tight braids or pony tails for long periods of time. Hairpieces and other hair styles that place an unnatural amount of stress on hair and scalp are similarly known to cause traction alopecia.

Learn More About Traction Alopecia

Visit the following article to learn more about causes, treatment, and prevention of traction alopecia.

Hair Loss Consultation and Treatment

Readers are also invited to call our Institute directly at 305.925.0222 to learn more about hair loss, restoration, and transplant procedures that produce beautiful natural-looking results. To learn more about traction alopecia and hair loss treatment, schedule a consultation with South Florida’s Top Hair Transplant Surgeons.

 

Hair Transplants: Safe for Teenagers?

Hair Transplants- Safe for Teenagers?This health report is meant to provide basic information on how nutrition, hairstyle, and other lifestyle elements may contribute to hair loss among teenaged boys and girls. It is important to understand that a comprehensive hair loss evaluation with a certified hair transplant surgeon is critical in the journey towards a healthier, fuller head of hair.

‘Hair loss’ is not typically something our society associates with teenagers. However, a number of causes may contribute towards the occurrence of thinning, balding, or shedding hair at an early age. Things like genetics, poor diet, unconscious hair pulling, and prescription medications may each play a causal role.

Learn more by visiting last week’s article on the top 7 causes of hair loss in teens. After better acquainting yourself with the most common reasons for hair loss among teens, you may wish to revisit this article to learn more about available treatment options.

Hair Transplants for Teenagers: Are They Safe?

Unfortunately, teenagers are not typically good candidates for a hair transplant. In general, a “good candidate” is a patient whose hair loss exhibits a number of characteristics, including the following:

  • Diagnosable cause of hair loss.
  • Hair loss with a predictable progression.
  • Donor hair that may be harvested to produce valuable hair grafts.

Though the cause of hair loss can usually be determined, it can be very difficult for a hair transplant surgeon to accurately predict how the hair loss of a teenage patient will progress. This makes it difficult, if not impossible, to conduct a transplant procedure that will look natural in the end. Moreover, conducting a hair transplant procedure during teenage years may reduce the number of valuable hair grafts available for future transplant procedures.

Hair Transplant Alternatives for Teens

The Good News: If you are a teenager and you notice signs of hair loss, rest assured that you are not alone. There are a number of hair transplant alternatives that are available to reverse the signs of hair loss, including natural methods as well as hair loss medications.

Natural Methods for Reducing the Signs of Teenage Hair Loss

There are a number of natural methods that may help to reduce the signs of hair loss among teenagers, including:

  • Eat well. The food we eat has a profound impact on the way we look and feel. Hair is no exception. Visit our article on foods for healthy hair to learn more about the nutrients that are the building blocks for beautiful hair.
  • Got Vitamin D? Vitamin D is a particularly important nutrient when it comes to keeping hair follicles fully functional. New research even suggests that vitamin D may stimulate hair growth.
  • Like people, hair enjoys a stress-free situation. Traction Alopecia is a common cause of hair loss that results from too much tension being placed on the hair for a prolonged period of time. Hairstyles like ponytails, hair weaves, and dreadlocks may damage the strength and longevity of hair. Read more about the causes of Traction Alopecia to learn how to identify this easily preventable cause of hair loss.
  • Speak to your physician about your current medications. Certain prescription medications can cause hair loss. If you find that you are prescribed to such a medication, you may wish to discuss an alternative treatment option with your health care professional.

Teens, Hair Loss, and Medications

When natural methods are not enough, teenagers may benefit from the use of medications for hair loss. Such medications should never be taken without first consulting a certified dermatologist or hair transplant professional. After a comprehensive evaluation, the physician may recommend 1 of 2 popular hair loss medications:

Rogaine® (Minoxidil)

Minoxidil, most commonly known by the brand name Rogaine®, is an approved medication that helps to stimulate the growth of new hair among both males and females. It is a topical application, and it is designed specifically to treat symptoms of pattern baldness, or Androgenetic Alopecia. Other important things to know about Rogaine include:

  1. Available for use among both males and females.
  2. Extra Strength formula available, starts to work after about 8 weeks.
  3. Active ingredient is minoxidil, which has undergone extensive testing for safety and effectiveness.
  4. Topical application, usually applied twice daily.

Propecia® (Finasteride)

Finasteride, most commonly known by the brand name Propecia®, is available for use by males only. Its claim to fame is that it can maintain existing hair, and in some cases it has been shown to trigger new hair growth. Propecia is designed to inhibit the creation of DHT, a male hormone that can “shut down” hair growth at the follicle. Other important things to know about Propecia include:

  1. Propecia is a prescription medication.
  2. Propecia cannot be used by women.
  3. Propecia is a daily medication.
  4. In clinical studies for PROPECIA, a small number of men experienced certain sexual side effects, such as less desire for sex, difficulty in achieving an erection, or a decrease in the amount of semen. Each of these side effects occurred in less than 2% of men and went away in men who stopped taking PROPECIA because of them.

Learn More About Hair Transplant Procedures

Are you a candidate for a hair transplant procedure? Our clinic is home to the finest technicians, registered nurses, and hair transplant surgeons in Florida. Request an appointment online, or call our clinic directly at 1-877-443-9070.

Teens and Hair Loss: The Top 7 Causes

Teens and Hair Loss- The Top 7 CausesWe typically associate ‘hair loss’ with older individuals, particularly gentlemen who experience male pattern baldness. However, it is common for teenagers to also experience symptoms of thinning, balding, or shedding. When it strikes, hair loss can cruelly disrupt a teen’s sense of self-esteem, confidence, and social life.

If you are a teenager and you notice signs of hair loss, rest assured that you are not alone. There is a growing population of boys and girls between the ages of 13 and 19 who share your experience, and there are a variety of lifestyle changes that you can make to improve the health of your hair.

An important note to our readers: This special health report has been created to provide an overview of the top 7 causes of hair loss in teens. It is intended for informational purposes only, and readers must remember to always consult a physician prior to making changes in diet or exercise regimens.

For additional information, readers are invited to learn more about hair loss evaluations online or contact our Institute directly at 1.877.443.9070.

What Causes Hair Loss in Teenagers?

Alopecia Areata

Alopecia Areata is a specific type of baldness that occurs in concentrated, rounded areas. It may occur on the scalp or on other portions of the body. At times, Alopecia Areata may manifest itself in several locations at once. For example, hair loss may simultaneously occur on the crown of the head, the sides of the head, and on the arm.

It is estimated that somewhere between 1-2% of Americans suffer with Alopecia Areata, including teenagers. For individuals who are affected by this condition, a new study released by Japanese researchers in Tokyo has called the treatment for Alopecia Areata ‘favorable’.

Androgenetic Alopecia

Androgenetic Alopecia is the most common cause of hair loss, affecting an estimated 2/3rds of all American males. Though most common among males over the age of 50, this type of pattern baldness may still affect teenagers. Females, in particular, may experience Female Pattern Hair Loss during the final teenage years and early-to-mid twenties.

Female Pattern Hair Loss

Female Pattern Hair Loss is a specific type of Androgenetic Alopecia (discussed above) that may affect teenage girls following puberty. This condition is most easily identified by a widening “part” that makes more and more scalp visible when styling the hair.

Proactively practicing stress management and nutritional awareness are two important steps in dealing with Female Pattern Hair Loss. For additional information, readers may visit this article on the 6 Ways to Prevent Female Hair Loss.

Traction Alopecia

Traction Alopecia is another common cause of thinning or shedding hair among teenagers, and it occurs when an unnatural amount of tension is applied to the hair for a prolonged period of time. The good news: Traction Alopecia is one of the few causes of hair loss in teens that is behavioral. Like unconscious pulling or plucking (see below), hair loss that results from Traction Alopecia may be significantly reversed simply by identifying and halting the behaviors that cause it.

For more information, please visit Traction Alopecia: Causes, Prevention, and Treatment.

Unconscious Hair Pulling and Plucking

Unconscious hair pulling or plucking is often the result of 2 different behaviors: Styling, and Trichotillomania. When it results from excessive styling, the hair loss typically occurs along the eyebrows and among the eyelashes. This is common among teenaged boys and girls alike, depending on the frequency and intensity with which they groom their eyebrows and eyelashes.

The second form of unconscious hair pulling / plucking is Trichotillomania. A psychological disorder, Trichotillomania occurs when a teenage boy or girl pulls their hair until it is uprooted, often leaving large areas of thin hair, damaged follicles, or total baldness. The best course of treatment for this type of hair loss is to consult a mental health professional or behavioral therapist to learn more about why the behavior is occurring, and how behavioral modification can be implemented to reduce its incidence.

Prescription Medications

Prescription medications are commonly used to treat a variety of health conditions among teenagers. Thyroid disorders, acne medications, and contraceptive medicines are just a few examples of the most common medications that may cause hair loss.

For a more comprehensive list, as well as hair loss prevention tips, readers may visit this article on prescription medications and hair loss.

Poor Diet

We’ve all heard the saying: You are what you eat. The skin and hair are the most noticeable reflections of that age-old adage, mostly because they are among the first physical characteristics we notice about another person. Failure to eat well can make it very difficult for your body to get the macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals it needs to maintain healthy hair. And while eating well may not be enough to reverse pattern baldness, it can certainly help to improve the health and longevity of existing hair.

To ensure the most naturally beautiful hair possible, individuals of all ages are encouraged to get plenty of these foods for healthy hair.

Learn More About Hair Loss and Restoration

Are you a candidate for a hair transplant procedure? Our clinic is home to the finest technicians, registered nurses, and hair transplant surgeons in Florida. Request an appointment online, or call our clinic directly at 1-877-443-9070.

Traction Alopecia: Causes, Prevention, and Treatment

Traction Alopecia- Causes, Prevention, and TreatmentTraction alopecia is a specific type of hair loss that results when tension is applied to hair for a prolonged period of time. In this way, traction alopecia differs from other types of hair loss in that it is behavioral. The progression of traction alopecia may be exacerbated by the affected individual, with areas of thinning or balding becoming more pronounced as hair is pulled, twisted, excessively styled, or otherwise abused over time.

Because traction alopecia is behavioral in nature, there are no prescription medications that can be used to treat it. Instead, preventing this condition from causing significant hair loss requires the individual to make changes in the way he or she styles, treats, and cares for their hair. Additionally, it is vital for both men and women to know the main causes of the condition so they may identify and prevent further hair loss before it becomes noticeable.

Top 5 Causes of Traction Alopecia

In general, any behavior that puts an unnecessary amount of stress or tension on the hair for a prolonged period of time may contribute to traction alopecia. Below are the 5 most common instances in which this can happen:

  1. Wearing unnecessarily tight ponytails, pigtails, or braids for a long period of time.
  2. Trichotillomania, a mental disorder characterized by incessant (and often unconscious) hair twisting, plucking, or pulling.
  3. Hairstyles that require hair to be tightly wound for a prolonged period of time.
  4. Hairpieces and weaves that must be affixed / clipped to the hair.
  5. Helmets, particularly compression-helmets like those worn while playing football, snowboarding, skiing, horseback riding, etc.

Getting Proactive: How to Prevent Traction Alopecia

Preventing traction alopecia hinges upon the ability to identify the root cause of the condition. From there, behavioral modification is necessary to ensure further hair loss will not be experienced. In some cases, it can be as simple as making a conscious effort to braid one’s hair more loosely, and to remove the braids at the end of each day to reduce tension buildup.

In other instances, however, behavioral modification can be much more difficult. When the individual unconsciously twists, pulls, or plucks their hair due to stress or anxiety, for example, a more comprehensive approach must be taken. In addition to identifying the condition, the individual must also explore the mental or emotional “triggers” that ultimately drive them to mistreat their hair. Only by disarming those underlying triggers will the individual be able to stop the condition from becoming worse.

Treating Traction Alopecia

Several hair loss treatments have been proven effective in treating traction alopecia. As noted above, however, it is critical that the individual must make an effort to identify and cease the behavior that was causing it in the first place. Otherwise, symptoms may progress and the thinning or balding may spread.

Will a Hair Loss Medication Work? Unfortunately, there are no prescription medications that will reverse the signs of traction alopecia. The condition is behavioral in nature, meaning that lifestyle changes must be made in order to treat it.

Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for Hair. Low Level Laser Therapy for hair is a relatively new treatment for thinning and balding hair that uses safe, FDA-cleared lasers to stimulate blood flow to dormant hair follicles. In doing so, LLLT may improve oxygen and nutrient delivery to the hair follicle, promoting natural growth again. For individuals suffering with traction alopecia, LLLT may be used in conjunction with behavioral modification to reduce the visibility of thinning / balding areas.

FUE Hair Transplant. The most effective way to restore areas that have been significantly damaged is through grafting individual hair follicles to the areas where thinning or balding is most prevalent. Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) involves transplanting individual follicular units to fill-in affected areas with a precise, natural touch.

Hair Loss Consultation at the Hair Transplant Institute

If you or a loved one suspects you suffer with traction alopecia, rest assured you are not alone. Nearly two thirds of men suffer with hair loss, and an estimated 1 in 4 females experiences hair loss as well. To learn more, schedule a consultation with South Florida’s Top Hair Transplant Surgeons.

Readers are also invited to call our Institute directly at 305.925.0222 to learn more about hair loss, restoration, and transplant procedures that produce beautiful natural-looking results.

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