Articles Tagged with: stress

Noodles Cause Hair Loss Among Japanese Men [Study]

Can instant noodles be causing Japanese men to lose their hair? According to researcher and writer, Ogawa Chieko, that might just be the case. It is thought that a diet of mostly noodles and broth might deprive the body of essential vitamins and nutrients for healthy hair. This type of hair loss is not to be confused with androgenic alopecia, the type of pattern baldness men and women inherit from their mother or father. Instead, this type of thinning or shedding is more similar to the temporary hair loss known to result from poor dietary choices, heightened levels of stress, or even heavy alcohol consumption.

Read more about stress-induced Telogen effluvium (hair loss).

Can Noodles Make You Bald?

If you are experiencing shedding or balding, it is not likely to be the result of an all-noodle diet.

Confusing Correlation with Causation

The Japanese study described above is a good example of how correlation is often mistaken for causation. In other words, one variable (x) is mistakenly thought to cause a specific outcome (y). So, while diet does have an affect on hair health, it is impossible to say that diet alone is responsible for hair loss. Other factors can play a causal role in shedding and balding, like genetics, daily stress, and fluctuations in hormonal balance.

To illustrate, consider that Japan ranks 60th in a recent Bloomberg assessment of the world’s most stressful countries (i). With this context, it becomes easier to see how one cannot attribute hair loss among Japanese men exclusively to a noodle-rich diet. Take a closer look at each individual, and personal details like genes and family medical history make it even more difficult to prove the “noodles cause hair loss” argument.

Eating for Healthy Hair

Nevertheless, the Japanese study offers a wakeup call to men and women who are not taking care of their bodies. Everyone should be proactive in eating a well-rounded diet, and not just for healthy hair. An overwhelming amount of research offers nearly irrefutable evidence that a balanced diet rich in lean proteins, healthy fats, colorful vegetables, and various fruits can reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular issues, diabetes, and other chronic diseases.

Never make any changes to diet or exercise regimen without first consulting with a physician. To learn more about nutrition and hair loss, visit these articles on the Miami Hair Blog:

Foods for Healthier Hair. From salmon to chickpeas and lentils, this article explores the most delicious all-natural foods proven to help grow fuller, stronger hair.

Macro Nutrients for Healthy Hair. Protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals. This article provides a more general overview of the “building blocks” of naturally strong hair.

Vitamin D and Hair Loss. Can ample amounts of vitamin D help to prevent hair loss? Visit this article to learn more about the study that has researchers saying vitamin D is “crucial for the regeneration of hair.”

Hair Loss Consultation Miami

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we understand that hair loss is much more than a physical medical condition. Hair loss can have a profoundly negative impact on social and professional life, causing immense levels of stress, anxiety, and even depression. We hold every patient’s pursuit of a fuller, natural head of hair in the highest regard, and we invite you to learn more about Miami’s most advanced hair loss treatment center.

For more information, contact us online or call our clinic directly at 877-443-9070.

Sources

(i) http://www.bloomberg.com/visual-data/best-and-worst//most-stressed-out-countries

Does Drinking Alcohol Cause Hair Loss?

Are alcohol and hair loss related? It’s a common question with a straightforward answer. In general, it is a myth that alcohol consumption causes your hair to fall out. Nevertheless, excessive alcohol consumption may cause serious long-term harm to the liver, nervous system, heart, stomach, and brain.

But why do so many men and women believe alcohol will cause hair loss? In this article, we address the myth that alcohol makes your hair fall out while exploring other ways drinking may hurt the health of the body.

Addressing the Myth of Alcohol and Hair Loss

Excessive amounts of alcohol is not healthy for the body. However, it is an overstatement to say, “Drinking alcohol causes hair loss.” There are many variables that contribute to thinning, shedding, and balding. Alcohol consumption alone is unlikely to be the reason a man or woman experiences hair loss, especially pattern baldness.

However, there are many ways that alcohol adversely affects the body and thus may contribute to weaker or thinner hair. They include the following:

Dehydration. Alcohol consumption lowers the natural level of anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) in the body. Naturally, ADH helps the body regulate hydration. As it tails off, the sensation to urinate develops, and the body starts expelling liquid.

Mineral Depletion. In addition to dehydrating the body, alcohol is known to lower the amount of important minerals in the body. Zinc and biotin are among the two most important to know, since both are important in the growth of naturally healthy hair.

Vitamin Depletion. Alcohol consumption is also linked with a decrease in vitamin levels, specifically C and A. Both vitamins play a key role in keeping the body healthy, so hair health can suffer when these vitamin stores are depleted.

Estrogen Production. Drinking alcohol is known to increase the production of estrogen. In both men and women, increased estrogen production can lead to hormonally-induced hair loss.

Stress. Indirectly, the stress caused by alcoholism, alcohol-induced accidents, and other related events might cause stress-related hair loss known as telogen effluvium. Telogen effluvium is a condition characterized by the early entrance of hair into the telogen phase of the hair growth cycle. During telogen phase, the hair follicle becomes dormant and new hair ceases to grow. Unlike other forms of hair loss, telogen effluvium is often temporary.

Treat Hair Loss at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami

To learn more about personalized hair loss diagnosis and treatment, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami online or call our clinic directly at 305-925-0222.

Hair Loss During Menopause: Causes, Symptoms, and Prevention

hair loss and menopauseHair loss is a lesser-known side effect of menopause. Most commonly, women and physicians associate menopause with other side effects like hot flashes, emotional swings, and significant menstrual cycle changes. Unfortunately, hair loss during menopause is a common occurrence that presents a very real threat to mental and emotional health.

Androgenetic alopecia, or pattern baldness, occurs differently in women than it does in men. Simply compare the Ludwig Classification (for female hair loss) with the Norwood Classification (for males), and the difference is quite clear. For men, pattern baldness typically begins with a receding hairline and progresses toward loss of hair at the crown of the head. For women, however, hair loss can be much more difficult to detect.

When a woman begins to lose hair, it usually happens in a more spread-out and diffuse manner along the top portion of the head. For this reason, many women do not recognize the [signs of female hair] loss until long after it has already begun.

With this in mind, here are 4 things to know and understand about hair loss during menopause.

Menopausal Hair Loss: 4 Things to Know

Hair Loss During Menopause is Hormonal

Hormonal fluctuations are known to cause hair loss in both men and women. For men, increased DHT production is usually the culprit responsible for the development of pattern baldness after age 40. Pregnant women sometimes experience the opposite, as pregnancy causes a surge in healthy hormones that can cause hair to become thick, rich, and vibrant.

During menopause, the body’s production of estrogen and other female hormones begins to decline. This causes a relative rise in androgens, or male hormones, which ultimate puts women at risk for developing hormonally induced hair loss.

Stress During Menopause Might Also Cause Thin Hair

Of course, hormones are not the only factor to consider. Certain elements of lifestyle might also contribute to hair loss during menopause. Most common is stress, which can lead to a specific type of hair loss referred to as telogen effluvium.

Telogen effluvium appears to occur when stress “shocks” the hair follicles into a dormant state in which hair no longer grows, according to the American Hair Loss Association. Taking proactive steps to reduce daily stress can help. Yoga, meditation, journaling, and quiet time alone are all activities that numerous studies associate with low levels of stress.

Psychological Effects of Hair Loss

Hair loss can cause serious mental and emotional health issues for both men and women. It’s vital to understand that such side effects are normal; the hair, face, and teeth are among the first characteristics one individual will notice about another. Together, they help to establish a first impression and, in some cases, a certain level of attraction. Not surprisingly, men and women can feel anxious, embarrassed, and depressed when the health and aesthetics of the face and hair are compromised.

There are two very important things to remember, however. First, stress has a way of exacerbating hair loss (see above). For this reason, women who notice symptoms of thinning, shedding, or balding during menopause are smart to remain calm and consult a physician. Second, women must remember that hair loss during menopause is treatable.

Menopausal Hair Loss is Treatable

There are a variety of treatment protocols available for women who notice thinning, shedding, or balding during menopause. When it comes to non-surgical hair restoration methods, Minoxidil (available by brand name Rogaine®) has been shown successful in halting hair loss for women. Minoxidil is a topical foam that must be applied to the scalp daily, however, which becomes tedious for some women.

Low level laser therapy for hair is a second non-surgical restoration method that has demonstrated an ability to reduce hair loss and, in some cases, stimulate new hair growth. LLLT exposes the scalp to safe, FDA-approved lasers that are designed to stimulate blood flow and nutrient delivery to the hair follicles. Women are particularly found of these “laser therapies for hair loss” because they are quick, convenient, safe, and effective.

Finally, women may elect to have a surgical hair restoration procedure to permanently reverse signs of hair loss. Surgical hair restoration is most commonly performed as a hair transplant, a procedure during which the patient’s own hair follicles are extracted from areas of healthy scalp and relocated to areas of thinning or balding. Surgeons transplant each follicular cluster (sometimes as small as 1-3 units) by hand, effectively camouflaging bald scalp with real hair that looks, feels, and grows naturally.

Early Detection, Successful Treatment

Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of restoring hair to its naturally full, resilient, and beautiful state. To move forward with a hair loss evaluation, schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our team represents South Florida’s finest surgeons, registered nurses, and technicians, each of whom hold your pursuit of a fuller head of hair in the highest regard.

Readers may also call our Institute at 305.925.0222 to speak directly with a member of our team.

Is It Normal to Lose Hair After Surgery?

Is It Normal to Lose Hair After SurgeryThe number of elective surgeries performed in 2012 grow to just over 1.6 million, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (i). Many more emergency, exploratory, and transplant surgeries were also performed, amounting to millions of procedures over the course of a single year. These procedures entail a certain degree of emotional stress and strain for both patient and family, particularly when the margin for error is slim.

Recently, patients have begun to ask a startling question: Why does hair loss occur after a surgical procedure?

Does Surgery Cause Hair Loss?

In short, surgery does not cause hair loss. Rather, hair loss is a result of the immense emotional and physical stress that surgery may inflict upon the patient. This type of stress-induced hair loss is referred to as telogen effluvium, and it differs drastically from androgenetic alopecia, or pattern baldness, in a couple key ways.

First, telogen effluvium is not inherited. Unlike telogen effluvium, genetics play a large role in determining whether or not an individual will experience pattern baldness as they age. On the other hand, telogen effluvium is typically triggered by an incredibly stressful incident. Car accidents, major life transitions, and even surgical procedures are all good examples of inciting incidents that might trigger the onset of telogen effluvium.

Second, telogen effluvium is not permanent. Whereas cases of pattern baldness are permanent unless treated via hair transplant surgery or non-surgical hair restoration, telogen effluvium might subside as the individual recovers from the stressful situation. Treatment is still recommended, however, for patients who wish to have their hair restored quickly and naturally.

Though fundamentally different, both hair loss conditions can be effectively treated with a variety of non-surgical and surgical procedures.

Treating Hair Loss After Surgery

Preventative Care. Physicians like to remind patients of the age-old adage, An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. In other words, taking steps to eat well, exercise often, and mitigate daily stress can go a long way in preventing the onset of hair loss after surgery. Still, there is always a chance that the physical stress of a surgical procedure will trigger hair loss.

Non-surgical Hair Restoration. Rogaine® (Minoxidil) is a very effective non-surgical method of hair restoration. A topical application, Rogaine has been shown in clinical trials to slow, and sometimes revers, the balding process in men and women.

Surgical Hair Restoration. Follicular unit extraction (FUE) procedures are among the fastest and most effective means of restoring areas of balding scalp. Following a thorough exam and consultation, a highly specialized surgeon will designate a donor area from which clusters of individual follicular units (hairs) will be extracted. Hairs are then transplanted, unit-by-unit, to carefully restore the natural appearance of  the bald area. For more information, readers are invited to visit the Hair Transplant Institute online to learn more about hair restoration techniques.

Find a Physician

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, our team understands the many ways in which hair loss can adversely affect personal, social, and professional life. Our Institute is home to South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, nurses, microscopists, and technicians. We offer our patients the most comprehensive hair loss treatment methodology, along with advanced technologies like the ARTAS® System by Restoration Robotics™.

To learn more about hair loss diagnosis and treatment, schedule a hair loss evaluation online or contact our office directly at 877.443.9070.

Sources:

(i) “Statistics.” The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Accessed 17 July 2013.

Losing Hair? You Could Have Hypertension

Losing Hair? You Could Have HypertensionHair transplant surgeons often encourage patients to monitor their hair for signs of thinning, shedding, and loss. Keeping tabs on hair health is about more than preserving appearance, however. An ever-growing body of research indicates that hair health is intricately tied to overall mental, physical, and emotional wellness. From stress-related shedding to loss caused by overzealous styling, there are a number of well-documented ways in which lifestyle can negatively (or positively) affect hair health.

Most recently, researchers have identified a new connection between hair and heart health. A Japanese team of scientists has found a convincing correlation between hair loss and hypertension, a condition more commonly referred to as high blood pressure. The findings are the result of a study of nearly 38,000 men and women in which participants who suffered with hair loss, specifically pattern baldness, were about 32% more likely to also exhibit signs of hypertension (i).

Hair Loss & Health: Why Consulting a Physician is a Big Deal

Researchers say their findings are important for at least two reasons. First, the study provides a serious word of caution to young men and women who first begin to lose their hair. With such a strong correlation between hair loss and hypertension, individuals who experience hair loss are wise to consult a physician about their physical health. Hypertension causes blood pressure to rise, which also causes the heart to work harder to circulate blood. Over time, this can make a patient more prone to heart attack and stroke. Hypertension is also associated with arterial diseases, kidney disease, and shorter life expectancy. In addition to consulting a physician about these conditions, individuals who experience hair loss may also wish to have blood analysis conducted to assess hormonal health.

Second, researchers say this study, along with others, helps to spread awareness for the way in which hair can be an external barometer for internal health. Lead researcher Dr. Erling Thom explains (ii):

“Through our research with Nourkrin and female hair loss, we have discovered that there are many health issues for men and women that can actually be identified at an early stage through looking for hair loss and thinning hair […]”

In this way, monitoring one’s hair for signs of thinning or shedding can ultimately provide an early alert that a larger health issue exists. In turn, patients who understand the risks associated with hair loss are more likely to consult a physician when it occurs, prompting early diagnosis and treatment. Dr. Erling elaborates:

“Losing hair is one of these very early signs [that your body is under stress from a disease], which up till now has not been treated with the respect it deserves, as a precursor to a more serious condition.”

This health report has been produced by the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. For additional information on our Institute, including hair loss evaluation and consultation services, readers are invited to contact our office directly at 1-877-443-9070.

Sources:

(i) “Hair Loss Could Be a Sign of Hypertension.” Maidenhead Online. Accessed 1 June 2013.

(ii) See above.

The Big Picture: What’s Really Causing Hair Loss?

The Big Picture- What’s Really Causing Hair LossWhen treating hair loss, understanding the root cause of the issue is the first step towards finding treatment. Getting to the root of the problem enables physicians to offer treatments that are both safe and effective. Sometimes, hair loss can be caused by environmental stress or other behavioral problems that the patient can learn to proactively manage. For this reason, understanding why hair loss occurs is empowering for the patient as well.

If you are experiencing hair loss symptoms, we invite you to explore the following resources on the Miami Hair Blog to learn more about your condition. Please note: These resources are not meant to provide specific medical diagnoses or treatment recommendations. All readers are urged to schedule an appointment with a licensed and experienced medical professional to properly diagnose their condition and find effective treatment.

Understanding Pattern Baldness

Sometimes, hair loss occurs in a somewhat recognizable and predictable pattern. Two common examples are receding hairlines and thin or bald areas at the rear of the scalp, at the crown.

Men who recognize these symptoms may learn more about the progression of their condition by referring to the Norwood Classification for male pattern baldness.

Women who recognize these symptoms may learn more by referring to the Ludwig Classification for female pattern baldness.

Stress Related Hair Loss

Stress may cause a change in the biochemistry of the hair follicle, according to reports from the American Hair Loss Association (i). This change can prematurely send hair into a resting phase, or Telogen phase. Hair may cease to grow entirely, depending on the severity and duration of the experienced stress, as well as the way in which the individual recovers from the incident. This type of hair loss is particularly common among women and may be heightened, in part, by hormonal fluctuations.

To learn more, visit our guide on Telogen Effluvium.

Prescription Medications and Hair Loss

Prescription medications may effectively treat a number of serious health conditions. Medicines can have side effects, however. Hair loss is a common issue for individuals who take a variety of medications, including oral contraceptives, thyroid prescriptions, and more.

To learn more, readers are invited to visit our guide, Can Prescription Medications Cause Hair Loss?.

Hair Loss and Teenagers

Though pattern baldness is typically associated with older gentleman, hair loss is also a common condition for many boys and girls in their teenage years of development. Teenagers are perhaps most susceptible to the cruel way in which hair loss can negatively affect self-esteem, confidence, and social life, making it vital for parents and teens to understand more about the most common reasons hair loss may occur.

Read more about the Top 7 Causes of Hair Loss in Teenagers.

Evaluations at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami

Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of restoring hair to its naturally full, resilient, and beautiful state. To learn more about a hair loss evaluation, schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our team represents South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, registered nurses, and technicians, each of whom hold your pursuit of a fuller head of hair in the highest regard.

Readers may also call our Institute at 305.925.0222 to speak directly with a member of our team.

Sources:

(i) “Effluviums.” American Hair Loss Association..

Adrenal Glands, Stress Hormones, and Hair Loss

Adrenal Glands, Stress Hormones, and Hair LossThe adrenal glands are a very important piece of the human endocrine system. Located just above the kidneys, the adrenal glands are responsible for the production of several hormones that are designed to help mammals, like human beings, thrive in a world that is naturally plagued with mental, physical, and emotional challenges.

Stress management is key, however. Failure to properly manage stress may inhibit the long-term ability of the adrenal glands to produce a natural balance of hormones. This adrenal gland dysfunction may trigger a variety of serious side effects, including fatigue, weight loss, dizziness, nausea, and hair loss.

The Positive Side of Stress

Believe it or not, stress can be a very good thing. Eustress, or positive stress, can play a fundamental role in motivating individuals to engage in positive behaviors like learning, socializing, and physical exercise. Stress may even help individuals escape threatening situations by triggering a rapid increase in metabolism, energy, and mental clarity. This reaction is facilitated, in part, by the production of stress hormones.

The best known of all stress hormones is cortisol. Cortisol is produced by the adrenal cortex in the adrenal glands, and its production increases in response to environmental stress. Higher levels of cortisol drive blood pressure upward while simultaneously increasing blood sugar levels. Without this simple biological reaction, mammals would be unable to make swift and decisive action in the face of immediate danger. The adrenal glands are not built to sustain long-term stress hormone production and regulation, however.

How Stress Hormones May Cause Hair Loss

Though beneficial in the immediate sense, the ongoing production of stress hormones may lead to adrenal fatigue. This condition is characterized by the ongoing production of cortisol in response to lingering environmental stress. With only so much production capacity, the adrenal glands begin to produce cortisol at the expense of other important hormones, like aldosterone and other androgens.

For men, the sudden drop in testosterone may not necessarily cause immediate side effects. Male reproductive organs, like the testes, can often make up the difference in the production of testosterone and other powerful androgens. For women, however, adrenal fatigue can be a more serious problem. Sudden decreases in the production of testosterone and DHEA (a precursor that facilitates natural testosterone production) can be lasting, particularly in women who are experiencing menopause (i).

Finding a Balance: How to Proactively Manage Stress

The most effective way to prevent stress-related hair loss is to proactively manage the people, events, and thoughts that are most likely to elevate your perception of stress each day. Most helpful are the following activities:

Physical Exercise

Running, weight lifting, and other physical activities are a great way to reduce stress. Additionally, physical exercise promotes healthy hormonal production. In this way, exercise can help to manage stress levels while also working to maintain a healthy balance between cortisol, testosterone, and other important androgens.

Breathing and Stretching

Breathing and stretching are the easiest way to relieve the body of tension and stress. Yoga has become popular in recent years for this very reason. Best of all, simple breathing and stretching exercises can be done in places that are notorious for causing stress. Try this technique at work, in traffic jams, and at home.

Meditation and Focus

Stress and tension can be stored in the mind, too. Just as stretching and breathing can relieve the body of stress, meditation can similarly relieve the mind of negative thoughts, perceptions, and cognitions. Daily meditation is also associated with greater levels of concentration and focus, two key ingredients to staying caught-up and stress-free in both personal and professional life.

Checking for Hair Loss

Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of restoring hair to its naturally full, resilient, and beautiful state. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we are pleased to offer the most comprehensive and technologically advanced methodology for diagnosing and treating hair loss in both men and women. Our team represents the finest hair transplant surgeons, registered nurses, microscopists, and clinical staff in South Florida, and we hold your pursuit of a fuller head of natural hair in the highest regard.

To move forward with a hair loss evaluation, schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Readers may also call our Institute at 305.925.0222 to speak directly with a member of our team.

Sources:

(i) “Hair Loss and Adrenal Function.” Livestrong. Accessed 1 April 2013.

 

Norwood Classification: Understanding Male Pattern Baldness

Norwood Classification- Understanding Male Pattern BaldnessNo Hair to the Throne, the headline read, commenting on Britain’s most eligible bachelor (i). POOR Prince William is losing his crowning glory it continued, mocking the 28 year old for displaying early signs of male pattern baldness. Of course, Prince William is not alone. An estimated 65% or more males suffer with signs of hair loss.

Most times, male pattern baldness is the result of hormonal changes that significantly impair the ability of the hair follicle to sustain natural hair growth. Termed androgenetic alopecia, this condition causes hair miniaturization, a phenomenon in which hair becomes thinner and finer each time it progresses through the growth cycle. Eventually, the hair falls out and ceases to grow entirely.

Psychological Distress. Studies indicate that hair loss may have a profoundly negative affect on not just self image, but on interpersonal interactions and professional life as well. The color, volume, and thickness of hair are major characteristics that affect how others perceive an individual. When compared to individuals with a full head of hair, those with thin or balding areas are often perceived as weaker, older, and less physically attractive. Now, that’s not to say that bald men are not confident. Our culture is filled with icons like Vin Diesel, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, and others who enjoy a “bald” look and wear it with confidence.

However, if hair loss is negatively impacting your personal, social, or professional life, there’s a problem. Fortunately, male pattern baldness tends to progress in a predictable pattern over time, allowing hair transplant surgeons to provide expert evaluations and treatment recommendations that will produce natural, long-lasting hair where once was only balding scalp.

Norwood Classification: Stages, Signs, and Symptoms

The Norwood Classification is a system that professionals use to characterize male pattern baldness. Depending on the location and the severity, pattern baldness is classified according to 1 of 7 stages. This helps hair surgeons understand both the extent of the current condition as well as the pattern in which balding is most likely to follow. These two variables play a critical role in determining which hair loss treatment options are capable of restoring areas of the scalp that are thin or completely bald.

The Norwood Classification also provides a framework for understanding how the patient’s baldness may progress. This becomes a very important variable when the patient chooses a hair transplant procedure. Understanding how baldness may progress enables the surgeon to deliver a beautifully natural-looking end result by strategically restoring areas that are thin, balding, or susceptible to future hair loss.

The 7 stages of the Norwood Classification are shown below. Each stage depicts a unique circumstance in which hair is thinning, shedding, or balding in specific areas:

Norwood Classification for Male Hair Loss

Female Hair Loss: For women, pattern baldness progresses in a very different manner. A unique classification system is used to characterize the stages of female hair loss, called the Ludwig Classification. Click the following link to learn more about the Ludwig Classification.

Hair Loss Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we hold our patients’ desire for a full and natural head of hair in the highest regard. We are home of South Florida’s most talented surgeons, microscopists, nurses, and staff. Our team works diligently to ensure each patient feels comfortable and confident during each visit, from evaluation to procedure and post-procedure follow-up.

Home of the ARTAS® System

In an effort to provide only the newest, safest, and most advanced procedures to our patients, the Hair Transplant Institute is proud to announce the arrival of the ARTAS System for hair transplant. Learn more about the ARTAS System, a physician-guided robotics technology that enables our team to deliver beautiful restoration results with unmatched precision, accuracy, and consistency.

Sources:

(i) No Hair to the Thrown. The Sun. Accessed 18 February 2013.

6 Ways to Prevent Female Hair Loss & Telogen Effluvium

6 Ways to Prevent Female Hair Loss & Telogen EffluviumLast week, the Miami Hair Blog explored the differences in Female Pattern Hair Loss vs. Telogen Effluvium. With 1 in 4 females suffering with signs of hair loss, an important question arises:

Can hair loss be prevented?

Though the causal factors and symptoms may differ, there are a number of preventative measures that can be taken to avert Female Pattern Hair Loss as well as Telogen Effluvium. And while these measures are effective for some, the following list is not a cure-all for every woman who suffers with hair loss. Care must be taken to examine the top signs of hair loss in women regularly, as early detection is critical in effectively restoring areas of thinning / balding hair.

Preventing Female Pattern Hair Loss & Telogen Effluvium

1. Stress Management

Stress has been shown in a number of studies to trigger the onset of hair loss, particularly Telogen Effluvium, and may even worsen symptoms over time. To hedge against stress-induced hair loss, it is recommended that women practice daily stress management. Light exercise, journaling, yoga, and meditation are just a few examples of effective stress management techniques.

2. Commit to Nutritional Wellness

Like the rest of the body, hair needs a comprehensive assortment of nutrients to grow to its full potential. Follow the Healthy Hair Diet to give your hair a fighting chance at healthy, sustainable growth.

3. Rule Out Prescription Medications

A number of prescription medications may cause hair loss. Speak with your physician about the side effects of your current medications. If documented side effects include hair loss, you may wish to speak with your physician about alternative treatments.

4. Schedule a Hair Loss Evaluation and Consultation

If you suspect you are losing your hair, one of the worst things you can do is to worry. Worrying only increases stress, and increases in stress may exacerbate the problem. Instead, seek a professional evaluation and diagnosis so you may better understand the nature of your unique condition. Schedule a hair loss evaluation to speak with a professional regarding the health and vitality of your hair, and form realistic expectations regarding treatment.

5. Consider Low Level Laser Therapy

Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is a popular treatment option among women because it is convenient, non-invasive, and discrete. Devices like the LaserCap™ LLLT device are designed to naturally stimulate hair growth by enhancing oxygen and nutrient delivery directly to hair follicles.

6. Advanced FUE Hair Transplant

Follicular unit transplant (FUE) procedures are another viable option for women who suffer with Female Pattern Hair Loss or Telogen Effluvium. FUE procedures harvest healthy hair follicles from the rear or side of the scalp and relocate them to the areas in which hair loss is most visible.

The Hair Transplant Institute of Miami is proud to offer the ARTAS® System for hair restoration, the world’s first and only physician-guided robotics equipment designed to perform FUE procedures with unmatched precision, consistency, and accuracy. To learn more about this exciting treatment option, readers are invited to visit this Frequently Asked Questions About ARTAS guide.

Female Pattern Hair Loss vs. Telogen Effluvium

Female Pattern Hair Loss vs. Telogen EffluviumAn estimated 1 in 4 females will suffer with hair loss by the age of 35. For many, the cause is linked to sudden hormonal changes that follow puberty or precede menopause. For others, hair loss may occur as a result of high stress situations like divorce, pregnancy, or chronic illness. No matter what the cause, most women have trouble admitting that they are experiencing hair loss (i).

Two leading causes of female hair loss include Female Pattern Hair Loss (known by the medical name androgenetic alopecia) and Telogen Effluvium. Androgenetic alopecia causes hair loss at the top and sides of the head and may be seen at a variety of ages. Telogen Effluvium typically occurs during the latter years of life and, as the name suggests, happens when hair follicles enter into the telogen (resting) phase prematurely. This disrupts the natural hair growth cycle, causing visible signs of thinning, shedding, or balding.

Female Pattern Hair Loss

  • Medical Name: Androgenetic Alopecia
  • Typically occurs at an early age, for example during the late teenage years or early 20’s.
  • Female Pattern Hair Loss may also manifest itself following a period of hormonal change (i.e. post-menopause).
  • Affected Areas: Frontal and parietal (sides) of the scalp. Hair density is usually preserved in the occipital scalp, or the lateral area that extends from ear-to-ear in the rear of the head. Thickness is also preserved in the frontal hairline.
  • What to Look for: When styling the hair, the central “part” becomes wider over time, making more and more scalp visible when the hair is parted.

Telogen Effluvium

  • Medical Name: Telogen Effluvium
  • Predominantly seen in women who are in their 40’s, 50’s, and 60’s.
  • Telogen Effluvium may manifest itself as excessive thinning, shedding, or balding that may happen abruptly.
  • Recent studies have linked sudden trauma, namely stress, with the onset of Telogen Effluvium (ii).
  • What to Look for: Many women notice a decrease in ponytail volume when the hair is pulled back / tied.

What Causes Telogen Effluvium?

The most commonly documented causes of Telogen Effluvium include:

Stress. “There does indeed seem to be a link between stress, a change in hair follicle biochemistry, and more hair follicles entering a telogen resting state,” reports the American Hair Loss Association (iii). Several studies support this idea, demonstrating that high levels of stress may cause individual hair strands to prematurely enter the “telogen resting state” before eventually falling out. Examples of such stressors include ongoing chronic illness, divorce, or other significant life events in which the outcome is uncertain or feared.

Physical Trauma. Similarly to stress, abrupt episodes of physical trauma may also send hair follicles into a telogen resting phase. Examples include car accidents and other events that induce a forceful shock to the body.

Prescription Medications. Hair loss may be the side effect of certain medications like antidepressants (and other mood altering drugs), acne medications, and a variety of other prescription drugs. For a more comprehensive list, please reference this article on prescription drugs that cause hair loss.

Nutritional Deficiency. Hair needs certain vitamins, minerals, and amino acids in order to grow naturally. For example, deficiencies in vitamin A, iron, or protein may inhibit the normal and healthy development of hair. Learn more about the foods for healthy hair, and proactively prevent hair loss due to nutritional deficiencies.

Seek an Evaluation with a Team You Can Trust

If you suspect you are suffering with Female Pattern Hair Loss or Telogen Effluvium, you are not alone. Nearly 25% of all females experience signs of hair loss by age 35, and most cases are treatable. To learn more about the option that is best for you, schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute. Our team is comprised of South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, nurses, microscopists, and technicians, each of whom understand the challenges hair loss presents to personal, social, and professional life.

Visit the following page to learn more about advanced hair loss evaluations at the Hair Transplant Institute. Readers are also invited to call our front desk directly at 305-925-0222.

Sources for this article include:

(i) Perez, Sylvia. “Healthbeat Report: Strands of Stress.” 28 September 2012. Abclocal.go.com.

(ii) American Hair Loss Association. “Effluviums.” Americanhairloss.org.

(iii) See above.

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