Articles Tagged with: stress hormones
prevent male pattern baldness

Can You Prevent Male Pattern Baldness?

prevent male pattern baldnessMany individuals are concerned about going bald later in life. To some degree, male pattern baldness (MPB) affects two-thirds of men by the time they reach age 35. By age 50, around 85 percent suffer noticeable thinning or balding. The odds of developing hair loss at an older age are high – so what can you do to prevent male pattern baldness or androgenic alopecia?

Androgenic alopecia is an often devastating and emotionally grim condition to cope with, despite how prevalent it is among men today. Although certain medications, immune problems, cancer treatments and traumas can cause hair loss, male-pattern baldness is hereditary. Those who experience MPB have follicles that are inherently sensitive to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a byproduct of testosterone that causes hair follicles to miniaturize. Once these follicles shrink to a severe extent, regrowth is challenging. But, early intervention can slow or stop the miniaturization process altogether.

Consider the following treatments which can help prevent male pattern baldness progression.

Minimize Your Stress

Although you can’t change your genetics, you can adapt your lifestyle to avoid circumstances that exacerbate hair loss. Serious stress or emotional trauma can render hair follicles inactive. Unlike normal hair growth, more hairs enter the resting phase (catagen) at once and fall out (exogen) in larger numbers about three months following a tense event. If you’re already predisposed to male pattern baldness, high stress interferes with whatever partial hair growth remains. Managing anxiety through meditation and a healthy work-life balance lessens your odds of abrupt shedding. Trying to prevent male pattern baldness from escalating is a stressful situation alone. If you already suffer from noticeable hair loss, seeking treatment early on reduces negative emotions by restoring self-confidence.  

Improve Your Physical Health

Changing your diet and starting an exercise regimen has a profound impact on your internal health, which can help prevent male pattern baldness severity. Studies show that older men with a higher cardiorespiratory fitness level release almost half as much cortisol as men who aren’t in healthy form.¹ Cortisol is the stress hormone believed to be linked with sudden hair shedding. When it comes to non-hereditary hair loss – which can strike alongside male pattern baldness and make matters worse – maintaining healthy hormone levels with exercise and good nutrition can enable healthy growth.

Create a Better Environment for Hair Growth

Low-level laser therapy, or LLLT, is a non-invasive technique used to stimulate underactive hair follicles. Through phototherapy, laser diodes interact with the scalp to promote better blood flow, helping follicles function properly. In some instances, LLLT helps prevent male pattern baldness from advancing. At-home laser caps can be used alongside other hair loss treatments, including prescriptions and topical foams. LLLT can also be used in conjunction with hair transplant surgery to reduce inflammation and nourish follicles for better results. Hair is stronger, thicker and more resilient to everyday damage.

Despite your genetics, hair loss does not have to become your destiny. To learn more about how to prevent male pattern baldness from worsening, or to discuss treatment options, call the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami at 305-925-0222. Through understanding, education and highly-effective treatment methods, we are determined to help patients attain a fuller head of hair and positive outlook on life.

 

¹ http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0141970

Hereditary Hair Loss, Demystified

Hereditary Hair Loss, DemystifiedAsapSCIENCE is making a big splash on YouTube. With over 500,000 subscribers, the science-based YouTube channel promises to deliver a weekly dose of science and fun through a series of animated videos that attack and demystify some of life’s most thought provoking questions. From describing the science of aging to learning why the chicken really crossed the road, the producers at AsapSCIENCE seem committed to helping Internet users better understand life, one 2 minute video at a time.

Earlier this month, AsapSCIENCE produced an excellent video on the science behind the most common instance of hereditary hair loss. We’re excited to share this video with our readers and encourage everyone to take a look:

An Important Note: As mentioned at the conclusion of the video, the presence (or absence) of a hair loss gene on the X chromosome is just one of the contributors to hair loss. And while it is the most common, it is important to remember that researchers are continually finding new hair loss genes. The hair loss gene APCDD1, for example, was just recently identified by collaborative research conducted at Columbia, Rockefeller, and Stanford Universities.

Hair Loss: A Polygenic Trait

The myth that “hair loss is inherited from the mother’s side” is derived from hair loss research of the early 1900s. Though well intentioned and progressive at the time, researchers were limited in their ability to analyze all possible contributing factors exhibited by their subjects. In the past, researchers have taken a single gene approach to hair loss research, choosing only 1 gene to track, analyze, and compare across different groups of subjects (i). This eventually led to the belief that hair loss was caused by a single gene on the X chromosome (as described in the video above).

While it’s true that certain genes on the X chromosome may cause hereditary hair loss, we now know that there’s a much bigger picture to consider. Modern medical research has identified hair loss is a very complex condition that is actually polygenic, meaning that a number of genes can play a causal role in its development and progression. Moreover, such genes can be inherited from either parent.

Genes and Appearance: What Determines Expression?

To complicate matters further, genetics are not the only thing to impact the way in which hair loss becomes visible, or expressed. A number of other factors may contribute as well, including:

Age. As a man or women continues to age, the likelihood that a hair loss gene may begin to express itself may increase.

Hormones. The relative balance of certain hormones like estrogen, testosterone, and DHT may have a profound impact on the health of hair follicles. DHT, in particular, is known to cause hair miniaturization by impairing healthy follicular function. For women, birth control pills may cause hair loss by similarly disrupting the relative balance of estrogen to testosterone.

Stress. According to the American Hair Loss Association, there is an apparent link between stress and hair loss (ii). Stress seems to affect hair follicle biochemistry, which may cause the hair to enter into a “resting” phase prematurely. This can lead to Telogen Effluvium, specific type of stress-induced hair loss.

Seek a Professional Hair Loss Evaluation, Today

When it comes to reversing the signs of hair loss, early detection is ctritical. Patients trust the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami because we are home to South Florida’s most talented transplant surgeons and clinical team. We are proud to offer the most comprehensive approach for evaluating and treating hair loss—an approach that has produced countless success stories.

Hair Loss Evaluation & Treatment. Readers are invited to learn more by visiting our hair loss evaluation page online. For direct assistance, readers are invited to contact our clinic directly at (305) 925-0222.

Sources:

(i) “Hair Loss Genes.” Bernstein Medical. Accessed 25 March 2013.

(ii) “Effluviums.” American Hair Loss Association. Accessed 25 March 2013.

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