Articles Tagged with: signs of hair loss
spring hair loss

Spring Hair Loss Facts and Symptoms

spring hair lossSpring hair loss is concerning among individuals who haven’t been diagnosed with a formal hair loss condition, like hereditary androgenic alopecia or autoimmune-related alopecia areata. Healthy, functioning follicles shed anywhere between 50 to 100 strands per day. Excessive shedding – which initially might lead to a clogged shower drain and later, noticeable thinning on the scalp – is an emotional circumstance that may or may not be linked to a more serious condition.

However, seasonal and spring hair loss is relatively normal. More often, men and women notice increased hair loss in autumn, usually between September and November. The reason more hairs fall out in fall is because follicles frequently enter their resting (telogen) phase mid-summer. The telogen state lasts a few months before hairs eventually release to make way for new hair growth. This timeline is likely an effect of human evolution. Hair growth in the winter helps protect the body against cold weather, which was critical before indoor heating and protective clothing became extensively available. Similarly, hair growth is higher in the summer to protect the scalp from ultraviolet rays and heat.

What is Spring Hair Loss?

A smaller but considerable increase in hair loss also occurs during springtime. Research suggests that both fall and spring hair loss is still within the healthy range of 50 to 100 strands per day. But, you’re more likely to see closer to 100 strands per day fall out in autumn and spring, and closer to 50 strands fall out each day in winter and summer. While seasonal hair loss does exist, patients who notice cyclical shedding are usually within the normal range of healthy hair loss.

Unless you physically count the number of hairs shed per day, it’s not easy to figure out if your hair loss is simply seasonal or the beginning of something more serious. Consider the tell-tale signs of the most common hair loss conditions:

  • Widespread thinning across the scalp (androgenic alopecia)
  • Receding hair line (androgenic alopecia)
  • Horseshoe-shaped pattern at the crown (androgenic alopecia)
  • Sudden bald patches that appear almost overnight (alopecia areata)
  • Complete loss of all bodily hair (alopecia totalis/universalis)
  • Broken, damaged hairs (traction alopecia)
  • Excessive shedding after weight loss, stress or drug treatment (telogen effluvium)

Visiting a hair loss doctor or specialist can put your concerns at ease and, if necessary, help you form a treatment plan to minimize further loss, reactivate follicles or restore areas of balding. For more information on South Florida hair restoration, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami at 305-925-0222.

 

6 Ways to Prevent Female Hair Loss & Telogen Effluvium

6 Ways to Prevent Female Hair Loss & Telogen EffluviumLast week, the Miami Hair Blog explored the differences in Female Pattern Hair Loss vs. Telogen Effluvium. With 1 in 4 females suffering with signs of hair loss, an important question arises:

Can hair loss be prevented?

Though the causal factors and symptoms may differ, there are a number of preventative measures that can be taken to avert Female Pattern Hair Loss as well as Telogen Effluvium. And while these measures are effective for some, the following list is not a cure-all for every woman who suffers with hair loss. Care must be taken to examine the top signs of hair loss in women regularly, as early detection is critical in effectively restoring areas of thinning / balding hair.

Preventing Female Pattern Hair Loss & Telogen Effluvium

1. Stress Management

Stress has been shown in a number of studies to trigger the onset of hair loss, particularly Telogen Effluvium, and may even worsen symptoms over time. To hedge against stress-induced hair loss, it is recommended that women practice daily stress management. Light exercise, journaling, yoga, and meditation are just a few examples of effective stress management techniques.

2. Commit to Nutritional Wellness

Like the rest of the body, hair needs a comprehensive assortment of nutrients to grow to its full potential. Follow the Healthy Hair Diet to give your hair a fighting chance at healthy, sustainable growth.

3. Rule Out Prescription Medications

A number of prescription medications may cause hair loss. Speak with your physician about the side effects of your current medications. If documented side effects include hair loss, you may wish to speak with your physician about alternative treatments.

4. Schedule a Hair Loss Evaluation and Consultation

If you suspect you are losing your hair, one of the worst things you can do is to worry. Worrying only increases stress, and increases in stress may exacerbate the problem. Instead, seek a professional evaluation and diagnosis so you may better understand the nature of your unique condition. Schedule a hair loss evaluation to speak with a professional regarding the health and vitality of your hair, and form realistic expectations regarding treatment.

5. Consider Low Level Laser Therapy

Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is a popular treatment option among women because it is convenient, non-invasive, and discrete. Devices like the LaserCap™ LLLT device are designed to naturally stimulate hair growth by enhancing oxygen and nutrient delivery directly to hair follicles.

6. Advanced FUE Hair Transplant

Follicular unit transplant (FUE) procedures are another viable option for women who suffer with Female Pattern Hair Loss or Telogen Effluvium. FUE procedures harvest healthy hair follicles from the rear or side of the scalp and relocate them to the areas in which hair loss is most visible.

The Hair Transplant Institute of Miami is proud to offer the ARTAS® System for hair restoration, the world’s first and only physician-guided robotics equipment designed to perform FUE procedures with unmatched precision, consistency, and accuracy. To learn more about this exciting treatment option, readers are invited to visit this Frequently Asked Questions About ARTAS guide.

Women and Hair Loss: Top 4 Signs

Women and Hair Loss: Top 4 SignsHair loss in women is more common than many may think, amounting to nearly 20 million females in America alone.  Most women do not notice signs of thinning or balding in their hair until the age of 50 or 60, long after it has already begun.  It may take women much longer to notice the signs of hair loss compared to men because they tend to wear their hair longer, effectively hiding telltale symptoms of hair loss for many years.  Women also lose hair across the entire top of the head, in contrast to men who typically lose hair in concentrated areas like the crown or temple.  This wider, more dispersed pattern of hair loss adds to the difficulty of early detection.

Yet it is early detection, evaluation, and treatment that are the 3 keys to effectively treating hair loss in women.  Early detection is perhaps most important, as hair loss is most effectively treated during the early stages of development.  For this reason, it is important that women learn to recognize the signs of hair loss while also performing regular self-examinations to ensure symptoms are caught as soon as they become visible.

Top 4 Signs of Female Hair Loss

Female hair loss manifests itself in a variety of ways; learning to recognize the signs of thinning or balding is the best way to diagnose and treat the condition early, which ultimate creates better results.  The most common signs to look for include the following:

  1. Thinning hair:  Unlike men, hair loss in women tends to develop in a general or widespread area throughout the top of the head.  Women must pay particular attention to this region, checking regularly for noticeable changes in thickness.
  2. A wider “part”:  If you regularly part your hair, take note of the thickness/width of the part.  Parts will appear to become wider as hair loss progresses.
  3. Hair accumulation on pillows, combs, and in the shower:  It is normal for hair to accumulate on our personal items and throughout our living spaces.  However, hair accumulation in these areas will become more pronounced as hair loss progresses.  Here’s a tip:  Look for increases in hair accumulation on the pillow of your bed and the comb you use most.  Effectively monitoring hair accumulation in the shower may be more difficult; some hair is inevitably washed down the drain, and it may be challenging to separate your hair from someone else’s.
  4. A more visible scalp:  Take notice of how much of the scalp is visible when your hair is pulled back.  As hair loss progresses, the underlying scalp will become increasingly visible.

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