Articles Tagged with: Propecia

Hair Loss Pharmaceuticals in 2019

There are many roads you can travel to reach your hair restoration destination. Which path offers the best way to restoring your hair to its full, youthful look will depend on your specific condition as determined by an experienced hair loss physician. It may involve hair transplant surgery, low-level laser therapy, or cutting-edge treatments such as platelet-rich plasma therapy and stem-cell hair growth.

But many patients who want to stop their hair loss and regrow the hair that has vanished can get outstanding results with prescription medication. Since Minoxidil, more commonly known as Rogaine®, was approved for the treatment of hair loss in the 1980s, pharmaceutical options for the treatment of pattern baldness in men and women have expanded, offering patients non-surgical avenues to address their hair loss issues.

Here are the most popular and commonly prescribed pharmaceutical hair loss treatments in 2019:

Minoxidil

The granddaddy of hair loss medications, Minoxidil works by converting vellus hairs –  short, fine body hairs –  to terminal hairs, which are fully developed “regular” hairs. This not only increases the size of hair follicles that have been affected by pattern baldness but also extends the growth phase of the growth cycle, resulting in thicker hair.

Minoxidil is typically applied topically to the scalp once or twice each day depending on the patient’s condition and the doctor’s recommendation. Application is easily done at home.

Individual users of Regular Strength Rogaine®  report success rates of 30-40% while users of Extra Strength Rogaine have observed success rates closer to 50-60%.

Minoxidil is not a cure for baldness. Rather, its real benefits are stopping or slowing down hair loss.

Finasteride (Propecia® and Proscar®)

Finasteride’s appeal is its effectiveness at maintaining existing hair for men with pattern baldness. 83% of men studied retained their original follicle count, and 64% experienced re-growth after two years.

Finasteride drugs like Propecia keep hair from shedding by inhibiting the body’s production of dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a naturally occurring derivative of testosterone. While DHT assists with sexual development in males during fetal development and puberty, research has also linked it to hair loss. Typically, due to genetics or other hormonal changes, hair follicles develop a sensitivity to DHT and begin to miniaturize. This process shortens the hair growth cycle and eventually causes new hair to stop growing. As such, individuals with elevated DHT levels may be more prone to hair loss.

Reducing DHT levels is what makes DHT blockers such as Propecia and Proscar so effective. Some studies have shown that Propecia can lower DHT levels by as much as 70%.

It is critical to note that because finasteride and DHT blockers like Propecia affect the hormone system, pregnant women or women who may become pregnant should not handle the medication as it may increase the risk of birth defects in male babies.

Dutasteride (Avodart®)

Like finasteride, dutasteride is a DHT-blocker. While the FDA ultimately approved finasteride in 1997 for the treatment of male pattern baldness, dutasteride has yet to receive such approval. But that may come soon.

The lack of FDA approval of dutasteride for hair loss treatment belies the fact that it works really well as a DHT blocker, meaning it may be equally effective at slowing the progression of pattern baldness. One study found that dutasteride blocked 98.4% +/- 1.2% of DHT at a 5mg daily dose, compared to 70.8 +/- 18.3% with the same amount of finasteride.

Dutasteride not only is effective at slowing hair loss, but it may also be better at promoting hair growth. A 2006 study of 416 men between 21 and 45 years-old found that over a 12-24-week period, dutasteride produced better hair count results than finasteride.

Spironolactone (Aldactone® or CaroSpir®)

Approved by the FDA to treat fluid retention caused by a range of conditions such as Iiver disease and kidney disease, spironolactone is also used to treat other ailments beyond its approved use, including the treatment of high blood pressure, heart failure, and hyperaldosteronism. In recent years, physicians have added female pattern hair loss to this list of “off-label” uses for spironolactone, usually after other medications or treatments haven’t worked for a patient.

Spironolactone is an “aldosterone receptor antagonist.” The “antagonist” part refers to the medication’s effectiveness at slowing down and reducing the body’s production of androgens. These male sex hormones, also found in women, are associated with hair loss caused by androgenetic alopecia. Reducing androgen levels can stop the progression of hair loss and even can encourage hair regrowth.

Call the Miami Hair & Skin Institute to Learn More About Pharmaceutical Hair Loss Options

If you’re ready to do something about your thinning hair and want to learn whether medication offers a viable solution for restoring your hair, contact the Miami Hair & Skin Institute online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222 to receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan.

Top 3 Topical Finasteride Myths

Top 3 Topical Finasteride MythsFinasteride, commonly known as Propecia® and Proscar®, is a widely used medication for the treatment of hair loss in men. It does a great job at maintaining existing hair and re-growing hair in a large percentage of guys dealing with androgenetic alopecia and is one of many non-surgical hair restoration treatments we offer at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami.

What is Finasteride?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved finasteride as an oral medication over 20 years ago. Its effectiveness is not in dispute: 83% of men studied were able to retain their initial follicle count, while 64% experienced re-growth after two years.

Finasteride gets these results by inhibiting the body’s production of dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a naturally occurring derivative of testosterone which helps with sexual development in males during fetal development and puberty. The problem is that DHT has been linked to hair loss, so reducing DHT levels can be the key to stopping hair loss in men.

In recent years the drug was introduced in a topical form, much like Rogaine. Since finasteride as a topical treatment is of fairly recent origin, many patients who are exploring hair loss treatment options hear conflicting reports or misinformation about the medication’s use in this form.

We’d like to clear up some of the most common topical finasteride myths so you can make a more informed decision about whether or not to consider this form of the drug in your efforts to combat hair loss. Of course, you should always consult with an experienced hair loss physician before making any decisions about how to proceed (and you’ll need to if you want finasteride in any form since it is prescription only).

Here are the top three finasteride myths we hear floating around:

Topical Finasteride is FDA Approved

As noted, oral finasteride was approved by the FDA for the treatment of hair loss over two decades ago. But the FDA has yet to approve the drug in topical form for this purpose, primarily because of a lack of data not because of any specific concerns about its safety. That said, finasteride’s effectiveness as a topical solution is being widely studied, and there are reports that the Swiss pharmaceutical company Polichem is working towards obtaining FDA approval in 2020.

Even though the FDA has yet to approve topical finasteride for the treatment of hair loss, it is still available in the U.S. for that purpose as an “off-label” prescription.

Topical Finasteride Has No Side Effects

DHT does much more than contribute to hair loss, which means that reducing DHT levels can have unwanted side effects. Since DHT plays a crucial role in male sexual development and mood regulation, reducing the amount of it in the body can impact these aspects of a man’s life in unwanted ways and cause:

Impotence
Lower sex drive
Difficulty achieving orgasm
Abnormal ejaculation
Gynecomastia (male breast development)
Depression

The good news is that that these side effects only appear in a small minority of men (about one out of every hundred) who take finasteride orally and if any issues do arise with sexual functioning, they are almost always temporary and will return to normal after discontinuing the drug.

But some have claimed that applying finasteride as a topical treatment gets rid of these risks. While this is untrue, it is likely that the possibility of side effects from the topical application will be less than oral ingestion due to the way the body absorbs the drug.

Topical Finasteride Can Actually Cause Hair Loss

Some men using finasteride report an increase in shedding soon after they begin using it, making them worry that the drug is doing more harm than good. The reality is that this mild shedding is normal and necessary for new hair to grow. Finasteride actively stops the current hair growth cycle and begins a new one. Any hair that is in mid-cycle will fall out and be replaced by healthier, stronger hair.

As with any medication, you should discuss with your hair loss physician whether DHT blockers or other pharmaceutical treatments offer a viable and effective option for addressing your hair loss issues.

If you’re ready to do something about your hair loss, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222 to receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan.

Hair Loss Prevention Plan: Finasteride (Propecia® and Proscar®)

Finasteride (Propecia® and Proscar®)In our last post, we talked about the importance of having a hair loss prevention plan if you’re genetically predisposed to losing your hair or if you’ve noticed the first signs that you may have an issue with shedding, thinning, or balding. The battle against hair loss is a fight you can win, but only with planning and action that addresses the causes of your condition.

Having a hair loss prevention plan in place can stop the problem from getting worse or slow down the rate of hair loss. Implementing a plan in consultation with your hair loss physician can increase the strength and resiliency of your follicles and even offer the possibility of growing new hair.

For many men, that plan involves the use of the prescription hair loss medication finasteride, more commonly known as Propecia® and Proscar®. This popular drug is effective at maintaining existing hair and re-growing hair in many men, but comes with some potential (though exceedingly rare) side effects and should not be used by women.

What is Finasteride and What Makes It So Effective?

Propecia’s claim to fame is its effectiveness at maintaining existing hair. 83% of men studied were able to retain their original follicle count, and 64% experienced re-growth after two years. Finasteride medications like Propecia accomplish this by inhibiting the body’s production of dihydrotestosterone, or DHT.

DHT is a naturally occurring derivative of testosterone which assists with sexual development in males during fetal development and puberty. The problem is that DHT has been scientifically linked to hair loss. Typically, due to genetics or other hormonal changes, hair follicles develop a sensitivity to DHT and begin to miniaturize. This process shortens the hair growth cycle and eventually causes new hair to stop growing. As such, individuals with elevated DHT levels may be more prone to hair loss.

Reducing DHT levels is what makes DHT blockers such as Propecia and Proscar so effective. Some studies have shown that Propecia can lower DHT levels by as much as 70%.

Problems With Reducing DHT Levels

DHT does much more than contribute to hair loss, which means that reducing DHT levels can have unwanted side effects. Since DHT plays a crucial role in male sexual development and mood regulation, reducing the amount of it in the body can impact these aspects of a man’s life in unwanted ways and cause:

  • Impotence
  • Lower sex drive
  • Difficulty achieving orgasm
  • Abnormal ejaculation
  • Gynecomastia (male breast development)
  • Depression

The good news is that that these side effects only appear in a small minority of men (about one out of every hundred) who use DHT blockers such as Propecia and Proscar. If any issues do develop with sexual functioning, they are almost always temporary and will return to normal after discontinuing the drug.

It is critical to note that since finasteride and DHT blockers like Propecia affect the body’s hormone system, they should not be handled by pregnant women or women who may become pregnant as it may increase the risk of birth defects in male babies.

As with any medication, you should discuss with your hair loss physician whether DHT blockers or other pharmaceutical treatments offer a viable and effective option for addressing your hair loss issues. 

If you’re ready to do something about thinning hair and implement an effective hair loss prevention plan, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222 to receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan.

Scalp Folliculitis and Hair Loss

Scalp Folliculitis and Hair LossScalp folliculitis, or hair folliculitis, is common among both men and women. This condition is characterized by moderate to severe irritation of the hair follicle(s), which may disrupt normal hair growth when left untreated.

Know the symptoms. If the irritated area of skin exhibits red pimples that appear to have a hair growing from the center, you may have hair folliculitis. This condition is easily recognized on the arms, back, legs, and beard/neck area. It is not so easily recognized when it occurs on the scalp, making it important to consult a hair loss professional should you notice pimples, itchiness, burning sensations, or discharge along the hairline, crown of the head, or rear/sides of the scalp.

Use the information below to learn more about hair folliculitis, scalp irritation, and hair loss. If you believe hair folliculitis might be causing you hair to thin, recede, or bald, schedule a hair loss evaluation to learn more about effective treatment with world renowned experts at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami.

What causes hair folliculitis?

Hair folliculitis is most commonly caused by the following:

  • Yeast
  • Fungus
  • Bacteria
  • Contact/rubbing from tight clothing
  • Damaged hair follicles (e.g. shaving irritation)
  • Blockage caused by irritants like sweat, oils, and cosmetic makeup

Can folliculitis lead to hair loss?

At first, the follicle may maintain its hair fiber while folliculitis begins to take effect. In time, irritation may make it impossible for the hair follicle to support a normal hair growth cycle. When pronounced, folliculitis can cause irritation so severe that it damages the hair follicle entirely, rendering it incapable of producing any hair at all.

Treat and Reverse Hair Folliculitis

There are a few effective ways to treat and reverse hair folliculitis.

  1. Get a hair loss diagnosis. Because hair folliculitis can be difficult to identify, it’s important to consult a hair loss professional should you notice any of the symptoms described above.
  1. Treat the folliculitis. Sometimes, folliculitis is caused by a bacterial infection that can be treated with an over-the-counter antibiotic ointment. In other cases, non-infectious hair folliculitis can be treated by thoroughly cleaning excess sebum from the scalp. When treating folliculitis, it’s important to follow the recommendation given by your hair loss professional.
  1. Regain what’s lost. Finally, consider additional hair loss treatments to prevent additional hair loss while also thickening your hair. Topical foam, prescription medication, and low-level laser therapy are among the most common forms of treatment. More information on each of these hair loss treatments is provided below.

Topical Hair Loss Foam

Everyone has seen a commercial for Rogaine®. As one of the most popular topical hair loss foams, Rogaine is widely recognized by men, women, and hair loss professionals as a viable option for slowing and stopping the progression of hair loss. Visit the following page to learn more about hair loss treatments like Rogaine.

Prescription Hair Loss Medication

One of the most common prescription medications for hair loss is finasteride, better known as Propecia®. This drug is available only for men, and women must be careful not to handle these tablets, especially while pregnant or nursing. If you are a man suffering with hair loss, visit the following page to learn more about prescription medicines like Propecia.

Laser Hair Restoration

Laser Hair Restoration (LHT) is enjoying a lot of recent popularity among men, women, and physicians. This is a minimally invasive, nonsurgical hair restoration option that involves laser treatment up to 3-4 times weekly. Patients may visit our office to receive laser therapy, or they may purchase a personal-use hair restoration laser like the Capillus272™ Pro for use at home.

Folliculitis Diagnosis and Treatment in Miami

If you believe hair folliculitis might be causing you hair to thin, recede, or bald, schedule a hair loss evaluation to learn more about effective treatment with world renowned experts at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our surgeons, nurses, and staff represent the finest team in Miami. To learn more about treatment, contact our clinic at 305-925-0222.

5 Hair Thickening Nutrients Every Man Should Consider

5 Hair Thickening Nutrients Every Man Should ConsiderMany men are surprised to learn that pattern baldness is a lifelong, progressive disease. Early diagnosis is the fastest way toward a fuller and more effective treatment. Before hair loss is noticeable, consider improving your diet with the following experimental herbs and roots for thicker hair.

An important note: The effectiveness of these herbs and roots is supported by mostly anecdotal evidence (derived from experience, rather than clinical trials). For a clinically proven solution to hair loss prevention and treatment, please skip to the Clinically Proven Ways to Improve Hair Thickness section below.

Experimental Herbs & Roots for Thicker Hair

  1. Ho Shou Wu

Ho Shou Wu is a Chinese root derived from the knotweed vine. Typically, it is sold in either a dried or powdered form. Hou shou wu is known among Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners for encouraging thicker hair growth, though this claim is largely anecdotal.

  1. Rose Water

This aromatic liquid is derived from a unique rose petal distillation process. It is high in antioxidants as well as anti-inflammatory properties, making it a double threat when it comes to preventing hair from thinning and shedding. 

  1. Pearl Powder

As the name suggests, this powder is derived from crushing authentic pearls. Pearl powder is rich in amino acids and other enzymes that are known to help cells grow. Most anecdotal evidence suggests pearl powder may improve skin health, though some say this benefit also improves hair thickness.

  1. Turmeric

This root is yellow in color, and you can find it either freshly sliced or powdered. TCM practitioners use turmeric as an anti-inflammatory, which might have benefits from a hair health perspective. By reducing inflammation, turmeric might help to improve blood flow across the scalp, in turn helping hair follicles to receive an adequate amount of blood, oxygen, and growth factors regularly.

  1. Burdock Root

Burdock Root is a thick brown root of the Burdock plant, available in dried or powdered form. Among natural healers, burdock root is best known for helping to reduce itchiness, dryness, and oily skin. This might be a byproduct of the root’s naturally high levels of antioxidants and antibacterial properties, which may also help to prevent hair follicle miniaturization.

Clinically Proven Ways to Improve Hair Thickness

Rogaine® (Minoxidil)

Rogaine® is perhaps the most widely recognized nonsurgical hair loss treatment, available over-the-counter (without prescription) at most drug stores. The foam is applied twice daily, directly to the scalp. To learn more, visit this page on hair loss drugs.

Propecia® (Finasteride)

Propecia® is another well known nonsurgical hair loss treatment, though it is available for use by men only. This prescription medication is taken daily to prevent the progression of hair loss. To learn more, visit this page on hair loss drugs.

Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT

Low level laser therapy is the newest nonsurgical method of hair restoration, using cool laser technology to stimulate the scalp, improve blood flow, and encourage naturally thicker hair. We are pleased to offer the Capillus272™ Pro to our patients, a leading laser therapy cap that is cleared by the FDA and known to improve hair counts by 51% (during clinical trials).

Learn More About Hair Loss Prevention

Do not wait until hair loss becomes a source of anxiety and shame. Learn more about hair loss prevention and treatment at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our clinic represents South Florida’s most experienced team of surgeons, microscopists, and staff.

For more information, contact us online or by phone at 305-925-0222.

How Thyroid Disease May Cause Hair Loss

How Thyroid Disease May Cause Hair LossHair health, fullness, and sheen are often indicators of the body’s internal wellness. Many diseases, conditions, and subsequent treatments trigger hair loss or dull, breaking strands. Two of those conditions are hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism. While they are complete opposite in terms of their issues – one is an overproduction while the other is an underproduction of hormones – they share a common symptom: hair loss.

If you suffer from a thyroid disorder and are currently experiencing hair loss or balding, knowing why and the steps you can take to combat this unfortunate side effect is important.

What is the thyroid?

The thyroid is a gland that releases a steady amount of hormones in the body. It’s pertinent to proper metabolic functions, growth, and development. The thyroid is located just below your voice box on the front of your neck. It is shaped somewhat like a butterfly with two lobes on each side connected in the center by a thin tissue. The thyroid stores hormones in small droplets within it’s vesicles, or follicles.

What does it do?

The thyroid is responsible for the production of three key hormones: T3 (also known as triiodothyronine), T4 (also known as Tetreaiodothyronine), and Calcitonin. T3 and T4 are both made up mainly of iodine.

Being the main component of two thyroid hormones, the thyroid requires iodine to function properly. Usually, the body absorbs iodine through the intestine and enters the blood stream. Then, it’s transferred to the thyroid gland to build T3 and T4. The body cannot produce iodine on it’s own since it’s a trace element.

One reason for an underactive thyroid, or hypothyroidism, is a lack of iodine. Other potential causes are genetics, age, Hasimoto’s thyroiditis, and various medications. Under-activity usually develops over time, rendering it hard to notice. The symptoms are weight gain, slowed metabolism, loss of energy, tiredness, difficulty concentrating, slow pulse, constipation, and hair loss. Many patients with an underactive thyroid assume their symptoms are part of the aging process, rather than a serious hormonal condition.

Hyperthyroidism, on the other hand, occurs from an overproduction of hormones in the thyroid gland. Energy metabolism speeds up and overactive thyroids lead to hot flashes, trembling, insomnia, racing heart, fatigue, diarrhea, weight loss, and hair loss.

Autoimmune diseases, issues with the thyroid axis, or autonomy from the pituitary gland are the three main causes of an overactive thyroid. The pituitary gland is responsible for regulating the amount of thyroid hormone produced, and a lack of communication between the two can cause overproduction.

Why does a dysfunctional thyroid lead to hair loss?

Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can cause hair loss. First, overactive thyroids sometimes lead to an increased development of DHT. DHT influences the development of sexual organs and secondary sexual characteristics, including physical appearance. But too much DHT can cause hair follicle shrinkage or elimination, resulting in shedding or thinning hair. Therefore, when an overactive thyroid impairs the production of DHT from testosterone, balding occurs.

For patients currently prescribed medication for an underactive thyroid, it’s important to note the side effects. One of the most common treatments is levothyroxine sodium, which also goes by the brand names Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid, and Unithroid. Sythroid specifically has been shown to cause long-term hair loss in patients.

How to treat thyroid-related hair loss

Whether you’re suffering from hair loss due to a hormonal imbalance from hypothyroidism or your thyroid medication is causing your hair loss, you have options for treatment.

First, many individuals take additional medication to offset the hair loss from their current thyroid medication. Results vary since medication affects every individual differently, but make sure to consult your physician prior to adding or subtracting from your current regimen.

Hair transplant surgery is another treatment option known to deliver consistent results. Given the advances in hair transplants, such as the Follicular Isolation Technique (FIT) developed by Dr. Paul Rose, transplants are more naturally looking than ever. Using FIT, Dr. Rose extracts individual follicles from donor areas and moves them to balding areas with little scarring. Follicular Unit Transplantations (FUT) is a more traditional approach offered by many restoration experts, including the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami.

Many individuals aren’t candidates for additional medication or hair transplant surgery after suffering from thyroid-related hair loss. Low-level laser therapy, or LLLT, uses safe lasers to stimulate hair follicles. At-home laser caps can be worn underneath virtually any hat or covering.

Learn More About Hair Loss Treatment in Miami

If you’re suffering from hair loss related to an underactive or overactive thyroid, the Hair Transplant Institute can help. We offer a variety of treatment options, customized to individual conditions, to revert this unfortunate side effect of thyroid dysfunction. Visit Miami Hair online, or contact our institute at 305-925-0222 to learn more about our personalized approach to hair loss diagnosis and treatment.

FDA: Patients Must Be Aware of Finasteride’s Sexual Side Effects

For men who suffer with hair loss, Finasteride typically makes the short list of treatment options that is both widely studied and highly recommended. Finasteride is most commonly known by the brand name Propecia®, and it is a hair loss pill that is taken orally to combat the phenomenon known as androgenic alopecia, or pattern baldness.

If you are considering Finasteride as a hair loss treatment, it is important to realize two things. First, like most prescription medications, Finasteride may cause side effects. In recent years, the most widely publicized side effect has been erectile dysfunction, though more data is needed to clarify both the duration and prevalence.

Second, men who do not want to take a prescription medication to treat hair loss have 3 viable alternatives that are proven to be effective. Those include minoxidil (Rogaine®), hair transplant surgery, and low level laser therapy. Only a hair loss professional can help you determine the best course of treatment, all 3 of which are explored in greater detail below.

Understanding the Side Effects of Finasteride

Men might be surprised to learn that Finasteride was not always a hair loss medication. In 1992, the FDA first approved the drug to treat enlarged prostate. Later, it became understood that Finasteride blocks an enzyme that helps convert testosterone to DHT, an androgen that has historically been correlated with pattern baldness. By inhibiting the conversion of testosterone to DHT, Finasteride gives hair follicles a fighting chance at maintaining a healthy, natural hair growth cycle. In turn, thinning and shedding subsides, and some men even notice hair begin to grow anew.

However, DHT is also an important androgen for male sex organs. Researchers theorize that Finasteride’s impact on DHT is ultimately what may cause sexual side effects— though a causal link has not yet been determined.

FDA: Prescribers and Patients Need to Be Aware

Since 2010, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has required Merck, the manufacturer of Propecia®, to label the medication with language that warns of possible sexual side effects. Those include erectile dysfunction, decrease in sperm motility, and other disorders that impair sexual activity. Despite warning labels, the FDA encourages physicians who prescribe the medication to also make clear to patients all the possible risks associated with the hair loss pill.

A causal link has not yet been determined, however, leading many patients wondering whether Finasteride is a safe medication to use. Of the 34 clinical trials that have been conducted, none have provided “adequate” information on the severity and frequency of sexual side effects, according to Dr. Steven Belknap, researcher assistant professor at Northwestern University (i). However, lack of information does not necessarily imply an attempt to hide poor results. Instead, Dr. Belknap believes it’s more likely a function of inadequate information. In the end, more studies will only improve knowledge and awareness of side effects.

Alternatives to Finasteride

If the thought of sexual side effects makes you uneasy, there are 3 additional ways to pursue a natural head of hair. Some are surgical while others are minimally invasive. Browse the options below, and visit our main website for additional information on each procedure.

Minoxidil – Non-surgical Procedure

Minoxidil, better known by the brand name Rogaine®, is a topical foam that is applied to the scalp twice daily. Millions of men and women choose this option for its ease of use and proven ability to stop hair loss.

Hair Transplant – Surgical Procedure

Hair transplant involves carefully extracting donor hair from one area of the scalp and moving it to the thinning or balding area. Primary methods of hair transplant include strip donor transplant, follicular unit extraction, and new robotic FUE procedures. For more information, visit our page on hair transplant surgery procedures.

Low Level Laser Therapy – Non-invasive Procedure

Phototherapy has been shown to help jump-start hair follicles that have gone dormant— a common phenomenon that causes thinning, shedding, and balding. Low level lasers are designed to induce phototherapy within the scalp, rejuvenating hair follicles to produce thicker and fuller hair. Visit the following page to learn more about low level laser therapy for hair loss.

Learn More About Hair Restoration in Miami

To learn more about surgical and non-surgical hair restoration options, contact our Institute online or call our clinic directly at 305-925-0222.

Sources

(i) http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2015/04/erectile-dysfunction-and-low-sex-drive-inadequately-reported-in-hair-loss-drug-trials-for-men.html

From Australia to UK, Hair Transplant Receives Celeb Endorsement

Most men and women understand that today’s hair transplant procedures are significantly more advanced than the “pluggy” procedures of the past. New technologies, refined extraction methods, and highly developed implant techniques make today’s transplants nearly impossible to detect. In fact, a recent study conducted by the ISHRS shows that over 84% of respondents could not identify hair transplant patients when compared to pictures of other men and women who had never experienced hair loss.

Not surprisingly, celebrities are among the thousands of men and women worldwide who enthusiastically embrace surgical hair restoration. What is surprising, however, is the openness with which celebrities are willing to share their transformation with the public.

Take Wes Welker, for example. This former New England Patriot shared his experience with surgical hair transplant with Americans nationwide, appearing on television commercials to share his decision to do something about his receding hairline. Read the full story here: Hair Transplant Receives Celebrity Endorsement from Wes Welker.

Americans are not the only celebrities to openly endorse hair transplants, however. In an article for Cric Life, cricket enthusiasts share before and after photos of 10 world renowned cricket players who “went for hair transplant” and—judging by the before and after photos—enjoyed exceptional results. Read the full story here: 10 Cricketers Who Went for Hair Transplant.

International Support for Hair Transplant

From Australia to the UK and America, hair transplant surgery is enjoying a booming rise in popularity among men and women of all ages. Individuals who suffer with thinning, shedding, receding hairlines, and pattern baldness may seek restoration via a range of effective treatments, including:

  • Strip donor hair transplant
  • Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) transplant
  • Robotic FUE transplant
  • Low level laser therapy (LLLT)
  • Topical foam treatments (minoxidil)
  • Prescription hair loss drugs (Finasteride)

Learn More About Hair Transplant in Miami

Learn more about surgical hair transplant procedures in Miami by contacting our Institute online. Readers are also invited to call our clinic directly at 305-925-0222.

New Method of Producing Stem Cells Falls Short

New Method of Producing Stem Cells Proves WrongEarlier this year, a team of Japanese scientists released studies that amazed the scientific community with a new method of producing stem cells. The new method claimed to have transformed ordinary cells into adult stem cells— cells capable of undergoing further transformation into any cell in the body. Researchers remained skeptical, however, as the new process involving a straight forward acid bath seemed overly simplistic and inherently flawed.

The study was originally published by a team of researchers from Boston and Japan in the scientific journal Nature. Following publication, however, leaders in the scientific community took issue with the images used as evidence in the study. Soon thereafter, specific elements of the Methods section of the papers received intense scrutiny, with many critics alleging issues of plagiarism.

Too Good to Be True: Scientists Withdraw Recent Stem Cell Findings

In a statement issued during a press conference with The Japan News, researcher Teruhiko Wakayama said, “I’m no longer sure that the articles are correct.” Mr. Wakayama is one of the first researchers to ever clone a mouse, making his endorsement-turned-retraction a shock to many. Elaborating on the study, Mr. Wakayama explained to news agency NHK World that he felt the experiments were correct, however the credibility of the data used as preconditions for the experiment had come into question.

Moreover, it’s important to note that the original studies involved cells from animal subjects, specifically mice. Even if successful, scientists face significant challenges when using the same methodology to achieve the same results in humans.

Proven Hair Loss Treatments

In the wake of these now compromised study results, it appears science is not any closer to a stem cell hair loss treatment. Fortunately, there are a number of hair loss treatment protocols that have been proven effective for men and women.

Non-surgical Hair Restoration

Non-surgical methods of hair restoration with a proven track record of success include:

Surgical Hair Restoration

Learn More About Hair Restoration in Miami

To learn more about the surgical and non-surgical methods of hair restoration available in Miami, contact the Hair Transplant Institute at (305) 925-0222.

Does Finasteride Cause Cancer?

Does Finasteride Cause CancerFinasteride (brand name Propecia®) is known among male hair loss sufferers as a powerful prescription medication capable of ceasing hair loss. Like all prescription medicines, Propecia is not without side effects. Most know that the medication may cause sexual side effects for the men who take it regularly. But are men also at risk of developing breast cancer?

Physicians have long prescribed Finasteride, and in some cases Dutasteride, to treat symptoms of enlarged prostate in men, or benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). As a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor, the medicine also helped to cease hair loss in subjects by warding off the chemical reaction that researchers believe causes hair follicles to stop producing hair. However, post-marketing data demonstrated some risk. Specifically, rare reports indicated that male breast cancer were a side effect of Finasteride treatment. For this reason, among others, Finasteride was considered dangerous to prescribe to women. Today, most hair transplant surgeons still steer women clear of Finasteride medication, recommending alternative surgical and non-surgical treatments for hair loss.

Despite rare reports of male breast cancer in men who took the popular BPH/ hair loss drug, the FDA approved Finasteride as a treatment for male pattern baldness in 1997. Now, nearly 15 years later, a study published in the Journal of Urology indicates that there is no link between Finasteride and breast cancer in men.

Study Finds No Link Between Finasteride and Breast Cancer

A new study published in the May 2013 Journal of Urology has men who take Finasteride breathing a long anticipated sigh of relief. According to the study, there appears to be no link between the onset of breast cancer and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, like Finasteride (Propecia®).

The finding is the result of over 10 years of study, during which researchers identified 339 men ages 40-85 who had breast cancer. Approximately 20 controls were identified per subject, amounting to more than 6,500 total. Using those controls, researchers were able to calculate the rate ratio for male breast cancer during regular exposure to 5-alpha reductase inhibitors using conditional logistic regression.

Summarizing the results of the landmark study, researchers report, “No statistically significant associations were observed between 5-alpha reductase inhibitors and breast cancer.”

Side Effects of Finasteride

Finasteride still has side effects, however. Clinical trials indicate that men who take Finasteride might suffer from a number of sexual side effects, including:

  • Loss of sex drive/ decreased libido
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Decreased ejaculate volume

Notably, Finasteride side effects tend to fade and disappear entirely once the drug is no longer taken. In a 2012 study, researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that the negative side effects of Finasteride might persist long after use is discontinued. That study was conducted with Propecia®, specifically, and it is important to note that the sample size was very small, consisting of fewer than 100 subjects. Follow-up studies are needed to assess the danger of long-term side effects.

For more information, readers are invited to visit our What is Finasteride reference.

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