Articles Tagged with: prescription medications

How Thyroid Disease May Cause Hair Loss

How Thyroid Disease May Cause Hair LossHair health, fullness, and sheen are often indicators of the body’s internal wellness. Many diseases, conditions, and subsequent treatments trigger hair loss or dull, breaking strands. Two of those conditions are hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism. While they are complete opposite in terms of their issues – one is an overproduction while the other is an underproduction of hormones – they share a common symptom: hair loss.

If you suffer from a thyroid disorder and are currently experiencing hair loss or balding, knowing why and the steps you can take to combat this unfortunate side effect is important.

What is the thyroid?

The thyroid is a gland that releases a steady amount of hormones in the body. It’s pertinent to proper metabolic functions, growth, and development. The thyroid is located just below your voice box on the front of your neck. It is shaped somewhat like a butterfly with two lobes on each side connected in the center by a thin tissue. The thyroid stores hormones in small droplets within it’s vesicles, or follicles.

What does it do?

The thyroid is responsible for the production of three key hormones: T3 (also known as triiodothyronine), T4 (also known as Tetreaiodothyronine), and Calcitonin. T3 and T4 are both made up mainly of iodine.

Being the main component of two thyroid hormones, the thyroid requires iodine to function properly. Usually, the body absorbs iodine through the intestine and enters the blood stream. Then, it’s transferred to the thyroid gland to build T3 and T4. The body cannot produce iodine on it’s own since it’s a trace element.

One reason for an underactive thyroid, or hypothyroidism, is a lack of iodine. Other potential causes are genetics, age, Hasimoto’s thyroiditis, and various medications. Under-activity usually develops over time, rendering it hard to notice. The symptoms are weight gain, slowed metabolism, loss of energy, tiredness, difficulty concentrating, slow pulse, constipation, and hair loss. Many patients with an underactive thyroid assume their symptoms are part of the aging process, rather than a serious hormonal condition.

Hyperthyroidism, on the other hand, occurs from an overproduction of hormones in the thyroid gland. Energy metabolism speeds up and overactive thyroids lead to hot flashes, trembling, insomnia, racing heart, fatigue, diarrhea, weight loss, and hair loss.

Autoimmune diseases, issues with the thyroid axis, or autonomy from the pituitary gland are the three main causes of an overactive thyroid. The pituitary gland is responsible for regulating the amount of thyroid hormone produced, and a lack of communication between the two can cause overproduction.

Why does a dysfunctional thyroid lead to hair loss?

Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can cause hair loss. First, overactive thyroids sometimes lead to an increased development of DHT. DHT influences the development of sexual organs and secondary sexual characteristics, including physical appearance. But too much DHT can cause hair follicle shrinkage or elimination, resulting in shedding or thinning hair. Therefore, when an overactive thyroid impairs the production of DHT from testosterone, balding occurs.

For patients currently prescribed medication for an underactive thyroid, it’s important to note the side effects. One of the most common treatments is levothyroxine sodium, which also goes by the brand names Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid, and Unithroid. Sythroid specifically has been shown to cause long-term hair loss in patients.

How to treat thyroid-related hair loss

Whether you’re suffering from hair loss due to a hormonal imbalance from hypothyroidism or your thyroid medication is causing your hair loss, you have options for treatment.

First, many individuals take additional medication to offset the hair loss from their current thyroid medication. Results vary since medication affects every individual differently, but make sure to consult your physician prior to adding or subtracting from your current regimen.

Hair transplant surgery is another treatment option known to deliver consistent results. Given the advances in hair transplants, such as the Follicular Isolation Technique (FIT) developed by Dr. Paul Rose, transplants are more naturally looking than ever. Using FIT, Dr. Rose extracts individual follicles from donor areas and moves them to balding areas with little scarring. Follicular Unit Transplantations (FUT) is a more traditional approach offered by many restoration experts, including the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami.

Many individuals aren’t candidates for additional medication or hair transplant surgery after suffering from thyroid-related hair loss. Low-level laser therapy, or LLLT, uses safe lasers to stimulate hair follicles. At-home laser caps can be worn underneath virtually any hat or covering.

Learn More About Hair Loss Treatment in Miami

If you’re suffering from hair loss related to an underactive or overactive thyroid, the Hair Transplant Institute can help. We offer a variety of treatment options, customized to individual conditions, to revert this unfortunate side effect of thyroid dysfunction. Visit Miami Hair online, or contact our institute at 305-925-0222 to learn more about our personalized approach to hair loss diagnosis and treatment.

Does Finasteride Cause Cancer?

Does Finasteride Cause CancerFinasteride (brand name Propecia®) is known among male hair loss sufferers as a powerful prescription medication capable of ceasing hair loss. Like all prescription medicines, Propecia is not without side effects. Most know that the medication may cause sexual side effects for the men who take it regularly. But are men also at risk of developing breast cancer?

Physicians have long prescribed Finasteride, and in some cases Dutasteride, to treat symptoms of enlarged prostate in men, or benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). As a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor, the medicine also helped to cease hair loss in subjects by warding off the chemical reaction that researchers believe causes hair follicles to stop producing hair. However, post-marketing data demonstrated some risk. Specifically, rare reports indicated that male breast cancer were a side effect of Finasteride treatment. For this reason, among others, Finasteride was considered dangerous to prescribe to women. Today, most hair transplant surgeons still steer women clear of Finasteride medication, recommending alternative surgical and non-surgical treatments for hair loss.

Despite rare reports of male breast cancer in men who took the popular BPH/ hair loss drug, the FDA approved Finasteride as a treatment for male pattern baldness in 1997. Now, nearly 15 years later, a study published in the Journal of Urology indicates that there is no link between Finasteride and breast cancer in men.

Study Finds No Link Between Finasteride and Breast Cancer

A new study published in the May 2013 Journal of Urology has men who take Finasteride breathing a long anticipated sigh of relief. According to the study, there appears to be no link between the onset of breast cancer and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, like Finasteride (Propecia®).

The finding is the result of over 10 years of study, during which researchers identified 339 men ages 40-85 who had breast cancer. Approximately 20 controls were identified per subject, amounting to more than 6,500 total. Using those controls, researchers were able to calculate the rate ratio for male breast cancer during regular exposure to 5-alpha reductase inhibitors using conditional logistic regression.

Summarizing the results of the landmark study, researchers report, “No statistically significant associations were observed between 5-alpha reductase inhibitors and breast cancer.”

Side Effects of Finasteride

Finasteride still has side effects, however. Clinical trials indicate that men who take Finasteride might suffer from a number of sexual side effects, including:

  • Loss of sex drive/ decreased libido
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Decreased ejaculate volume

Notably, Finasteride side effects tend to fade and disappear entirely once the drug is no longer taken. In a 2012 study, researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that the negative side effects of Finasteride might persist long after use is discontinued. That study was conducted with Propecia®, specifically, and it is important to note that the sample size was very small, consisting of fewer than 100 subjects. Follow-up studies are needed to assess the danger of long-term side effects.

For more information, readers are invited to visit our What is Finasteride reference.

What is Finasteride?

A professional review of Finasteride side effects

What is FinasterideWe’re excited to announce that Dr. Nusbaum and Dr. Rose have been published in the August 2013 edition of the Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America Hair Restoration review. We congratulate our lead surgeons, and welcome Miami residents to get a brief look at one of the topics they covered in great detail: Treating hair loss with Finasteride, also known by the brand name Propecia®.

More on this publication. Published quarterly, “The Clinics” gathers reviews and testimony from the nation’s leading cosmetic and reconstructive surgeons on a variety of medical and surgical disciplines. Disciplines are many and varied, spanning 59 unique areas including Veterinary, Dental, and Nursing.

The Clinics is widely recognized as a leading reference for surgical professionals and residents/ prospective cosmetic surgery patients who desire current information on new treatment protocols. Published by surgeons, the reviews are widely recognized for providing in-depth coverage, unparalleled detail, and expert insight.

About Finasteride

Finasteride is a leading non-surgical option for the treatment of male pattern baldness. Most patients recognize Finasteride by the brand name Propecia®.

When comparing different treatment methods, the claim-to-fame of Finasteride is that it helps patients maintain existing hair. In studies, it has been shown that about 82% of men who begin taking Finasteride maintain their original follicle count. A smaller but sizable number of men (64%) experienced re-growth of hair after about 2 years of continued use.

One of the primary causes of male pattern baldness is DHT, a synthesized version of testosterone that becomes more prevalent in males as they age. Over time, DHT causes a phenomenon known as hair miniaturization, which eventually causes baldness to progress.

How it works. Finasteride inhibits a critical enzyme needed to convert testosterone to DHT. With continued Finasteride dosage, DHT production is halted and baldness stops. Continued use of Finasteride may have side effects, however, as detailed below.

Side Effects of Finasteride

Finasteride has undergone clinical evaluations for both safety and effectiveness. And while some experience success when using it to treat pattern baldness, others experience Finasteride side effects. Most commonly, side effects of this hair loss pill include:

  • Decreased libido
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Decreased ejaculate volume

Can Women Use Finasteride to Treat Hair Loss?

At this time, women cannot use Finasteride. Women who want to treat hair loss have the following options available, some of which are surgical procedures:

Non-surgical procedures:

  • Minoxidil (Rogaine®)
  • Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT)
  • Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP), though this treatment is most effective when used in conjunction with a surgical hair transplant.

Surgical procedures:

  • Strip Donor Hair Transplant
  • Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) / Follicular Isolation Technique (FIT) Transplant
  • Robotic Hair Restoration with the ARTAS®

Finasteride Reviews

A professional review of Finasteride reveals that the hair loss medication has clinical trials to support its effectiveness in treating symptoms of male pattern baldness. For additional reviews and information, visit this page on Finasteride reviews.

Please Note: The above links to Drugs.com, a third party website on which the opinions shared do not necessarily reflect those of our Institute. Always consult a licensed medical professional prior to starting, stopping, or changing your prescription medications.

Learn More About Finasteride at the Miami Hair Institute

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we offer numerous non-surgical hair loss treatment options including Propecia® (Finasteride), Rogaine® (Minoxidil), and exciting new Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) designed to stimulate follicular activity and hair growth.

To learn more about these clinically proven hair loss treatments, schedule a hair loss evaluation online or call our Institute directly at 1-877-443-9070.

Sources:

(i) Nusbaum, Bernard M.D., Rose, Paul M.D. Side Effects of Finasteride. Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America. 2013 August; 337-338.

August is Hair Loss Awareness Month 2013

August is Hair Loss Awareness Month 2013It’s estimated that hair loss affects 2/3rds of all men and millions more women. According to the International Society for Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS), approximately 25% of Americans feel insecure and self-conscious when losing hair, and 95% feel “bothered.”  And when it comes to restoring those luscious locks, 73% of hair loss sufferers say they would trade a valuable personal possession for more hair.

Hair loss can have a profoundly negative effect on social, personal, and professional life. Men and women do not have to suffer with a compromised self-image, however.

This August, the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami joins the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) in raising awareness for hair loss. An annual campaign, Hair Loss Awareness Month aims to help men and women better understand the causes for this widespread condition, as well as effective treatments for restoring the scalp to its natural, beautiful, and youthful appearance.

Get Involved This August

There are many ways to get involved with Hair Loss Awareness Month. The Miami Hair Blog is a good place to start, as our archives feature valuable resources on hair loss, transplant techniques, hair restoration technologies, and much more. Below are just a few ways you can use our Institute’s resources to learn more about this serious condition, share important materials, and ultimately help hair loss sufferers overcome the negative side of losing hair.

Learn what causes pattern baldness.

There are several factors known to contribute to loss of hair among men and women. Some individuals seem to be hard-wired for hair loss, a specific type of pattern baldness known as androgenetic alopecia. Others experience hair loss in the aftermath of a serious and stressful life event, a phenomenon known as Telogen Effluvium. Still others experience thinning or shedding due to traction alopecia, a type of hair loss that occurs when hair is styled, flattened, or held in a restricted position for a prolonged period of time.

Understanding the cause of hair loss is essential in determining an effective course of treatment. Learn more by reading our About Hair Loss section.

Understand the Signs and Progression of Baldness

Male hair loss progresses in a somewhat typical pattern depicted by the Norwood Classification. Physicians use the Norwood Classification to determine the extent to which a man has begun to lose his hair. It is also used to predict how hair loss will progress, providing the insight needed for surgeons to effectively plan and perform a transplant that is natural in appearance. Learn more about the Norwood Classification for male pattern baldness.

Female hair loss also occurs in a somewhat predictable pattern, however it differs drastically from male pattern baldness. Physicians use a different method of classification for women, known as the Ludwig Classification. Visit this article on diagnosing female hair with the Ludwig Classification loss to learn more.

Know when hair loss is a sign of a larger health issue.

One of the most important reasons to spread awareness for hair loss is because it could be a sign of a serious health condition. There are a number of studies that correlate hair loss with serious illness, making it critical that patients consult a physician when noticing signs of thinning, shedding, or balding.

Prescription Medications. In some cases, hair loss is the side effect of a prescription drug. If you experience hair loss, speak to your physician about alternatives to your current medication. Please Note: Always consult a physician prior to making changes to your prescription medication regimen.

Heart Disease. Recently, the University of Tokyo released findings that indicate bald men are at a higher risk of developing coronary heart disease. The research was the culmination of studying some 37,000 men and indicated that chances of heart condition also increase with the severity of hair loss. Visit this article to read more on how bald men are at high risk for heart disease.

Share this article.

Finally, share this article to become actively involved in spreading awareness for health, hair loss, and effective treatment. Together, we can raise awareness for the serious health risks associated with this condition, as well as methods of diagnosis and effective treatment.

Take action.

If you or a loved one has noticed thinning, shedding, or balding hair, contact our Institute to schedule a hair loss evaluation. Our team proudly represents South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, and we stand committed to providing only the most advanced methodology and technologies to help men and women realize their dreams of a fuller, natural head of hair.

Readers are also invited to call toll free 877-443-9070.

The Big Picture: What’s Really Causing Hair Loss?

The Big Picture- What’s Really Causing Hair LossWhen treating hair loss, understanding the root cause of the issue is the first step towards finding treatment. Getting to the root of the problem enables physicians to offer treatments that are both safe and effective. Sometimes, hair loss can be caused by environmental stress or other behavioral problems that the patient can learn to proactively manage. For this reason, understanding why hair loss occurs is empowering for the patient as well.

If you are experiencing hair loss symptoms, we invite you to explore the following resources on the Miami Hair Blog to learn more about your condition. Please note: These resources are not meant to provide specific medical diagnoses or treatment recommendations. All readers are urged to schedule an appointment with a licensed and experienced medical professional to properly diagnose their condition and find effective treatment.

Understanding Pattern Baldness

Sometimes, hair loss occurs in a somewhat recognizable and predictable pattern. Two common examples are receding hairlines and thin or bald areas at the rear of the scalp, at the crown.

Men who recognize these symptoms may learn more about the progression of their condition by referring to the Norwood Classification for male pattern baldness.

Women who recognize these symptoms may learn more by referring to the Ludwig Classification for female pattern baldness.

Stress Related Hair Loss

Stress may cause a change in the biochemistry of the hair follicle, according to reports from the American Hair Loss Association (i). This change can prematurely send hair into a resting phase, or Telogen phase. Hair may cease to grow entirely, depending on the severity and duration of the experienced stress, as well as the way in which the individual recovers from the incident. This type of hair loss is particularly common among women and may be heightened, in part, by hormonal fluctuations.

To learn more, visit our guide on Telogen Effluvium.

Prescription Medications and Hair Loss

Prescription medications may effectively treat a number of serious health conditions. Medicines can have side effects, however. Hair loss is a common issue for individuals who take a variety of medications, including oral contraceptives, thyroid prescriptions, and more.

To learn more, readers are invited to visit our guide, Can Prescription Medications Cause Hair Loss?.

Hair Loss and Teenagers

Though pattern baldness is typically associated with older gentleman, hair loss is also a common condition for many boys and girls in their teenage years of development. Teenagers are perhaps most susceptible to the cruel way in which hair loss can negatively affect self-esteem, confidence, and social life, making it vital for parents and teens to understand more about the most common reasons hair loss may occur.

Read more about the Top 7 Causes of Hair Loss in Teenagers.

Evaluations at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami

Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of restoring hair to its naturally full, resilient, and beautiful state. To learn more about a hair loss evaluation, schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our team represents South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, registered nurses, and technicians, each of whom hold your pursuit of a fuller head of hair in the highest regard.

Readers may also call our Institute at 305.925.0222 to speak directly with a member of our team.

Sources:

(i) “Effluviums.” American Hair Loss Association..

Hair Transplants: Safe for Teenagers?

Hair Transplants- Safe for Teenagers?This health report is meant to provide basic information on how nutrition, hairstyle, and other lifestyle elements may contribute to hair loss among teenaged boys and girls. It is important to understand that a comprehensive hair loss evaluation with a certified hair transplant surgeon is critical in the journey towards a healthier, fuller head of hair.

‘Hair loss’ is not typically something our society associates with teenagers. However, a number of causes may contribute towards the occurrence of thinning, balding, or shedding hair at an early age. Things like genetics, poor diet, unconscious hair pulling, and prescription medications may each play a causal role.

Learn more by visiting last week’s article on the top 7 causes of hair loss in teens. After better acquainting yourself with the most common reasons for hair loss among teens, you may wish to revisit this article to learn more about available treatment options.

Hair Transplants for Teenagers: Are They Safe?

Unfortunately, teenagers are not typically good candidates for a hair transplant. In general, a “good candidate” is a patient whose hair loss exhibits a number of characteristics, including the following:

  • Diagnosable cause of hair loss.
  • Hair loss with a predictable progression.
  • Donor hair that may be harvested to produce valuable hair grafts.

Though the cause of hair loss can usually be determined, it can be very difficult for a hair transplant surgeon to accurately predict how the hair loss of a teenage patient will progress. This makes it difficult, if not impossible, to conduct a transplant procedure that will look natural in the end. Moreover, conducting a hair transplant procedure during teenage years may reduce the number of valuable hair grafts available for future transplant procedures.

Hair Transplant Alternatives for Teens

The Good News: If you are a teenager and you notice signs of hair loss, rest assured that you are not alone. There are a number of hair transplant alternatives that are available to reverse the signs of hair loss, including natural methods as well as hair loss medications.

Natural Methods for Reducing the Signs of Teenage Hair Loss

There are a number of natural methods that may help to reduce the signs of hair loss among teenagers, including:

  • Eat well. The food we eat has a profound impact on the way we look and feel. Hair is no exception. Visit our article on foods for healthy hair to learn more about the nutrients that are the building blocks for beautiful hair.
  • Got Vitamin D? Vitamin D is a particularly important nutrient when it comes to keeping hair follicles fully functional. New research even suggests that vitamin D may stimulate hair growth.
  • Like people, hair enjoys a stress-free situation. Traction Alopecia is a common cause of hair loss that results from too much tension being placed on the hair for a prolonged period of time. Hairstyles like ponytails, hair weaves, and dreadlocks may damage the strength and longevity of hair. Read more about the causes of Traction Alopecia to learn how to identify this easily preventable cause of hair loss.
  • Speak to your physician about your current medications. Certain prescription medications can cause hair loss. If you find that you are prescribed to such a medication, you may wish to discuss an alternative treatment option with your health care professional.

Teens, Hair Loss, and Medications

When natural methods are not enough, teenagers may benefit from the use of medications for hair loss. Such medications should never be taken without first consulting a certified dermatologist or hair transplant professional. After a comprehensive evaluation, the physician may recommend 1 of 2 popular hair loss medications:

Rogaine® (Minoxidil)

Minoxidil, most commonly known by the brand name Rogaine®, is an approved medication that helps to stimulate the growth of new hair among both males and females. It is a topical application, and it is designed specifically to treat symptoms of pattern baldness, or Androgenetic Alopecia. Other important things to know about Rogaine include:

  1. Available for use among both males and females.
  2. Extra Strength formula available, starts to work after about 8 weeks.
  3. Active ingredient is minoxidil, which has undergone extensive testing for safety and effectiveness.
  4. Topical application, usually applied twice daily.

Propecia® (Finasteride)

Finasteride, most commonly known by the brand name Propecia®, is available for use by males only. Its claim to fame is that it can maintain existing hair, and in some cases it has been shown to trigger new hair growth. Propecia is designed to inhibit the creation of DHT, a male hormone that can “shut down” hair growth at the follicle. Other important things to know about Propecia include:

  1. Propecia is a prescription medication.
  2. Propecia cannot be used by women.
  3. Propecia is a daily medication.
  4. In clinical studies for PROPECIA, a small number of men experienced certain sexual side effects, such as less desire for sex, difficulty in achieving an erection, or a decrease in the amount of semen. Each of these side effects occurred in less than 2% of men and went away in men who stopped taking PROPECIA because of them.

Learn More About Hair Transplant Procedures

Are you a candidate for a hair transplant procedure? Our clinic is home to the finest technicians, registered nurses, and hair transplant surgeons in Florida. Request an appointment online, or call our clinic directly at 1-877-443-9070.

Teens and Hair Loss: The Top 7 Causes

Teens and Hair Loss- The Top 7 CausesWe typically associate ‘hair loss’ with older individuals, particularly gentlemen who experience male pattern baldness. However, it is common for teenagers to also experience symptoms of thinning, balding, or shedding. When it strikes, hair loss can cruelly disrupt a teen’s sense of self-esteem, confidence, and social life.

If you are a teenager and you notice signs of hair loss, rest assured that you are not alone. There is a growing population of boys and girls between the ages of 13 and 19 who share your experience, and there are a variety of lifestyle changes that you can make to improve the health of your hair.

An important note to our readers: This special health report has been created to provide an overview of the top 7 causes of hair loss in teens. It is intended for informational purposes only, and readers must remember to always consult a physician prior to making changes in diet or exercise regimens.

For additional information, readers are invited to learn more about hair loss evaluations online or contact our Institute directly at 1.877.443.9070.

What Causes Hair Loss in Teenagers?

Alopecia Areata

Alopecia Areata is a specific type of baldness that occurs in concentrated, rounded areas. It may occur on the scalp or on other portions of the body. At times, Alopecia Areata may manifest itself in several locations at once. For example, hair loss may simultaneously occur on the crown of the head, the sides of the head, and on the arm.

It is estimated that somewhere between 1-2% of Americans suffer with Alopecia Areata, including teenagers. For individuals who are affected by this condition, a new study released by Japanese researchers in Tokyo has called the treatment for Alopecia Areata ‘favorable’.

Androgenetic Alopecia

Androgenetic Alopecia is the most common cause of hair loss, affecting an estimated 2/3rds of all American males. Though most common among males over the age of 50, this type of pattern baldness may still affect teenagers. Females, in particular, may experience Female Pattern Hair Loss during the final teenage years and early-to-mid twenties.

Female Pattern Hair Loss

Female Pattern Hair Loss is a specific type of Androgenetic Alopecia (discussed above) that may affect teenage girls following puberty. This condition is most easily identified by a widening “part” that makes more and more scalp visible when styling the hair.

Proactively practicing stress management and nutritional awareness are two important steps in dealing with Female Pattern Hair Loss. For additional information, readers may visit this article on the 6 Ways to Prevent Female Hair Loss.

Traction Alopecia

Traction Alopecia is another common cause of thinning or shedding hair among teenagers, and it occurs when an unnatural amount of tension is applied to the hair for a prolonged period of time. The good news: Traction Alopecia is one of the few causes of hair loss in teens that is behavioral. Like unconscious pulling or plucking (see below), hair loss that results from Traction Alopecia may be significantly reversed simply by identifying and halting the behaviors that cause it.

For more information, please visit Traction Alopecia: Causes, Prevention, and Treatment.

Unconscious Hair Pulling and Plucking

Unconscious hair pulling or plucking is often the result of 2 different behaviors: Styling, and Trichotillomania. When it results from excessive styling, the hair loss typically occurs along the eyebrows and among the eyelashes. This is common among teenaged boys and girls alike, depending on the frequency and intensity with which they groom their eyebrows and eyelashes.

The second form of unconscious hair pulling / plucking is Trichotillomania. A psychological disorder, Trichotillomania occurs when a teenage boy or girl pulls their hair until it is uprooted, often leaving large areas of thin hair, damaged follicles, or total baldness. The best course of treatment for this type of hair loss is to consult a mental health professional or behavioral therapist to learn more about why the behavior is occurring, and how behavioral modification can be implemented to reduce its incidence.

Prescription Medications

Prescription medications are commonly used to treat a variety of health conditions among teenagers. Thyroid disorders, acne medications, and contraceptive medicines are just a few examples of the most common medications that may cause hair loss.

For a more comprehensive list, as well as hair loss prevention tips, readers may visit this article on prescription medications and hair loss.

Poor Diet

We’ve all heard the saying: You are what you eat. The skin and hair are the most noticeable reflections of that age-old adage, mostly because they are among the first physical characteristics we notice about another person. Failure to eat well can make it very difficult for your body to get the macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals it needs to maintain healthy hair. And while eating well may not be enough to reverse pattern baldness, it can certainly help to improve the health and longevity of existing hair.

To ensure the most naturally beautiful hair possible, individuals of all ages are encouraged to get plenty of these foods for healthy hair.

Learn More About Hair Loss and Restoration

Are you a candidate for a hair transplant procedure? Our clinic is home to the finest technicians, registered nurses, and hair transplant surgeons in Florida. Request an appointment online, or call our clinic directly at 1-877-443-9070.

6 Ways to Prevent Female Hair Loss & Telogen Effluvium

6 Ways to Prevent Female Hair Loss & Telogen EffluviumLast week, the Miami Hair Blog explored the differences in Female Pattern Hair Loss vs. Telogen Effluvium. With 1 in 4 females suffering with signs of hair loss, an important question arises:

Can hair loss be prevented?

Though the causal factors and symptoms may differ, there are a number of preventative measures that can be taken to avert Female Pattern Hair Loss as well as Telogen Effluvium. And while these measures are effective for some, the following list is not a cure-all for every woman who suffers with hair loss. Care must be taken to examine the top signs of hair loss in women regularly, as early detection is critical in effectively restoring areas of thinning / balding hair.

Preventing Female Pattern Hair Loss & Telogen Effluvium

1. Stress Management

Stress has been shown in a number of studies to trigger the onset of hair loss, particularly Telogen Effluvium, and may even worsen symptoms over time. To hedge against stress-induced hair loss, it is recommended that women practice daily stress management. Light exercise, journaling, yoga, and meditation are just a few examples of effective stress management techniques.

2. Commit to Nutritional Wellness

Like the rest of the body, hair needs a comprehensive assortment of nutrients to grow to its full potential. Follow the Healthy Hair Diet to give your hair a fighting chance at healthy, sustainable growth.

3. Rule Out Prescription Medications

A number of prescription medications may cause hair loss. Speak with your physician about the side effects of your current medications. If documented side effects include hair loss, you may wish to speak with your physician about alternative treatments.

4. Schedule a Hair Loss Evaluation and Consultation

If you suspect you are losing your hair, one of the worst things you can do is to worry. Worrying only increases stress, and increases in stress may exacerbate the problem. Instead, seek a professional evaluation and diagnosis so you may better understand the nature of your unique condition. Schedule a hair loss evaluation to speak with a professional regarding the health and vitality of your hair, and form realistic expectations regarding treatment.

5. Consider Low Level Laser Therapy

Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is a popular treatment option among women because it is convenient, non-invasive, and discrete. Devices like the LaserCap™ LLLT device are designed to naturally stimulate hair growth by enhancing oxygen and nutrient delivery directly to hair follicles.

6. Advanced FUE Hair Transplant

Follicular unit transplant (FUE) procedures are another viable option for women who suffer with Female Pattern Hair Loss or Telogen Effluvium. FUE procedures harvest healthy hair follicles from the rear or side of the scalp and relocate them to the areas in which hair loss is most visible.

The Hair Transplant Institute of Miami is proud to offer the ARTAS® System for hair restoration, the world’s first and only physician-guided robotics equipment designed to perform FUE procedures with unmatched precision, consistency, and accuracy. To learn more about this exciting treatment option, readers are invited to visit this Frequently Asked Questions About ARTAS guide.

Female Pattern Hair Loss vs. Telogen Effluvium

Female Pattern Hair Loss vs. Telogen EffluviumAn estimated 1 in 4 females will suffer with hair loss by the age of 35. For many, the cause is linked to sudden hormonal changes that follow puberty or precede menopause. For others, hair loss may occur as a result of high stress situations like divorce, pregnancy, or chronic illness. No matter what the cause, most women have trouble admitting that they are experiencing hair loss (i).

Two leading causes of female hair loss include Female Pattern Hair Loss (known by the medical name androgenetic alopecia) and Telogen Effluvium. Androgenetic alopecia causes hair loss at the top and sides of the head and may be seen at a variety of ages. Telogen Effluvium typically occurs during the latter years of life and, as the name suggests, happens when hair follicles enter into the telogen (resting) phase prematurely. This disrupts the natural hair growth cycle, causing visible signs of thinning, shedding, or balding.

Female Pattern Hair Loss

  • Medical Name: Androgenetic Alopecia
  • Typically occurs at an early age, for example during the late teenage years or early 20’s.
  • Female Pattern Hair Loss may also manifest itself following a period of hormonal change (i.e. post-menopause).
  • Affected Areas: Frontal and parietal (sides) of the scalp. Hair density is usually preserved in the occipital scalp, or the lateral area that extends from ear-to-ear in the rear of the head. Thickness is also preserved in the frontal hairline.
  • What to Look for: When styling the hair, the central “part” becomes wider over time, making more and more scalp visible when the hair is parted.

Telogen Effluvium

  • Medical Name: Telogen Effluvium
  • Predominantly seen in women who are in their 40’s, 50’s, and 60’s.
  • Telogen Effluvium may manifest itself as excessive thinning, shedding, or balding that may happen abruptly.
  • Recent studies have linked sudden trauma, namely stress, with the onset of Telogen Effluvium (ii).
  • What to Look for: Many women notice a decrease in ponytail volume when the hair is pulled back / tied.

What Causes Telogen Effluvium?

The most commonly documented causes of Telogen Effluvium include:

Stress. “There does indeed seem to be a link between stress, a change in hair follicle biochemistry, and more hair follicles entering a telogen resting state,” reports the American Hair Loss Association (iii). Several studies support this idea, demonstrating that high levels of stress may cause individual hair strands to prematurely enter the “telogen resting state” before eventually falling out. Examples of such stressors include ongoing chronic illness, divorce, or other significant life events in which the outcome is uncertain or feared.

Physical Trauma. Similarly to stress, abrupt episodes of physical trauma may also send hair follicles into a telogen resting phase. Examples include car accidents and other events that induce a forceful shock to the body.

Prescription Medications. Hair loss may be the side effect of certain medications like antidepressants (and other mood altering drugs), acne medications, and a variety of other prescription drugs. For a more comprehensive list, please reference this article on prescription drugs that cause hair loss.

Nutritional Deficiency. Hair needs certain vitamins, minerals, and amino acids in order to grow naturally. For example, deficiencies in vitamin A, iron, or protein may inhibit the normal and healthy development of hair. Learn more about the foods for healthy hair, and proactively prevent hair loss due to nutritional deficiencies.

Seek an Evaluation with a Team You Can Trust

If you suspect you are suffering with Female Pattern Hair Loss or Telogen Effluvium, you are not alone. Nearly 25% of all females experience signs of hair loss by age 35, and most cases are treatable. To learn more about the option that is best for you, schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute. Our team is comprised of South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, nurses, microscopists, and technicians, each of whom understand the challenges hair loss presents to personal, social, and professional life.

Visit the following page to learn more about advanced hair loss evaluations at the Hair Transplant Institute. Readers are also invited to call our front desk directly at 305-925-0222.

Sources for this article include:

(i) Perez, Sylvia. “Healthbeat Report: Strands of Stress.” 28 September 2012. Abclocal.go.com.

(ii) American Hair Loss Association. “Effluviums.” Americanhairloss.org.

(iii) See above.

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