Articles Tagged with: male pattern baldness
Progressive Pattern Hair Loss

Progressive Pattern Hair Loss Explained

Progressive Pattern Hair LossThe end result of hair loss is the same for everybody: hair that winds up on the shower floor, stuck in a brush, on your pillow, or pretty much anywhere other than your scalp. But how that hair falls out, where it falls out, and why it falls out can vary from person to person. People lose and shed their hair for different reasons, and those reasons will play a role in how baldness or thinning hair will manifest itself.

There are two primary hair loss patterns experienced by both men and women: progressive and diffuse. Understanding the differences between the two can help you identify your hair loss problem earlier and guide you as you seek options for stopping further loss and restoring your hair to a fuller, natural state.

Progressive Pattern Hair Loss

Accounting for over 95 percent of hair loss cases, progressive pattern baldness, also known as androgenetic alopecia, is a hereditary condition that causes hair miniaturization. This phenomenon causes hair follicles to become thinner and finer each time they progress through the growth cycle. Eventually, the follicles cease to grow at all and fall out.

Progressive pattern hair loss follows a familiar and predictable course. In men, it starts with shedding in the front of the scalp above the forehead that causes the hairline to recede gradually. This progresses to more noticeable hair loss across the top of the head, and finally toward the crown. In women, androgenetic alopecia acts differently, occurring throughout the scalp rather than in specific, isolated areas as it does in men.

Men are more likely to notice and experience pattern baldness earlier than women. 25 percent of American men see symptoms of male pattern baldness before the age of 21, approximately 66 percent of men suffer some degree of hair loss by age 35, and 85 percent of men see significant thinning related to androgenetic alopecia by age 50. About 40 percent of women experience pattern baldness but may not see any signs of thinning hair until the age of 50 or 60, long after the shedding starts.

Diffuse Hair Loss

As opposed to pattern baldness, which you can blame on your genes, diffuse hair loss is usually caused by environmental factors such as stress, hormonal imbalances, or trauma. These issues cause a condition called telogen effluvium in which hair follicles are shocked into a resting state. Since the follicles are not actively producing more hair to replace normal shedding, the thinning occurs in a diffuse pattern throughout the scalp. If the factors which are causing the thinning can be addressed and resolved, the follicles often return to their normal healthy state and fully regrow without surgical intervention.

If You See the First Signs of Hair Loss, Take the First Step Towards Fixing It

No matter how your hair loss issues become apparent, the first step towards fixing the problem is arranging for a comprehensive hair loss evaluation. Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of stopping further hair loss and restoring the hair you’ve lost.  Schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami today by calling us at 305.925.0222. We look forward to assisting you.

Does WEN Cause Hair Loss?

Damaging Hair Care Practices to Avoid

Does WEN Cause Hair Loss?Nature v. nurture. It is the age-old debate about what makes us who we are. Is it what we were born with, is it the lessons we learn and the habits we develop, or is it a mix of both?

When it comes to hair loss, the genes you were born with – nature – play a dominant role in determining whether you will develop some of the most common hair loss conditions such as male pattern baldness and androgenetic alopecia. But the way you treat your hair and the hair care practices you use – nurture – can also affect the strength and health of your hair and impact whether you’ll suffer from hair loss.

Unfortunately, many of the ways we treat or style our hair to make it look the way we want it to can, over time, make our hair look a way we definitely don’t want it to. Try to avoid these damaging hair care practices so your hair stays healthy – and on your head:

  • Brushing and styling while wet. When your hair is wet, it is at its most vulnerable and more prone to damage. When you brush or comb your hair while wet, it can stretch your hair follicles and cause breakage. Blot your hair with a towel and wait for a bit before blow-drying or styling your hair.
  • Too much heat. Heat may help you dry and style your hair, but too much heat is a terrible thing for your hair. That flat iron can do wonders if you want to straighten your hair, but be mindful of how much heat you use; if the flat iron is too hot, it will make your hair follicles dry and brittle and result in hair breakage. Similarly, use a lower setting on your hair dryer or attach a diffuser to keep the heat from frying your follicles.
  • Tight hairstyles. Traumatic and traction alopecia are hair loss conditions that can arise if you apply constant tension and strain to your hair follicles through the way you style and wear it. When you keep hair follicles stretched to their breaking point they will, in fact, break and can eventually die and fall out. Avoid wearing unnecessarily tight ponytails, pigtails, or braids for an extended period or hairstyles that keep hair tightly wound for a prolonged time.
  • Product buildup. Gels, mousse, hairspray or other styling products do not inherently contribute to hair loss. But if you leave product in your hair too long without washing it out, it can cause damage which could lead to hair shedding. The key is washing your hair regularly to prevent styling products from contributing to any long-term buildup of sebum-based plaque which could lead to a condition called scalp folliculitis. Over time, the irritation that is the most prominent symptom of folliculitis may make it impossible for the hair follicle to support a normal hair growth cycle. This irritation can become so acute that it damages the hair follicle permanently.

Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

While avoiding bad hair care and styling behaviors can help you prevent follicle damage and reduce the chances of avoidable hair loss, restoring any hair you’ve already lost may require treatment by a hair loss physician.  At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we know how to help men and women restore their hair no matter what the underlying cause of their hair loss.

To schedule your personalized hair loss evaluation, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Hair Loss Myths

Air Pollution and Male Pattern Baldness

Hair Loss MythsMale pattern baldness, or androgenetic alopecia, is a hereditary condition which afflicts two-thirds or men by the age of 35. By age 50, over 85 percent of men will develop signs of pattern baldness. While your genes will determine whether you are predisposed to androgenetic alopecia, other factors can contribute to the progression and degree of hair loss caused by the condition. Stress, poor diet, certain medications and treatments, and trauma are all non-genetic issues which can further weaken or destroy already vulnerable follicles. So too can the air pollution that surrounds all of us.

Air pollution is the source of a range of health problems, such as respiratory ailments, sinus issues, and allergies. The toxins in the air caused by industry, cars, fossil fuels, and other human activity shorten life spans and add billions of dollars to health care costs. Those same toxins that wreak havoc by entering the body and bloodstream can also cause harm when they come into contact with our skin, including our scalp and hair.  

Large suspended particles, small airborne particles, smoke and gaseous pollution settle on the scalp and hair where they can cause scalp irritation, redness, itching, excessive sebum secretion, and dandruff. Those pollutants can also damage hair follicles themselves, leading to hair loss. This irritation and damage can both mimic the symptoms of and contribute to androgenetic alopecia.

Studies have shown that various toxins, chemicals and carcinogens found in polluted air (and tobacco smoke) can hurt keratins, which are the proteins that form the foundation of hair structure. When keratins are damaged, hair can become weak and brittle, causing hair growth to slow down and eventually compromising the follicles so much that they die and fall out.

Men with androgenetic alopecia can’t change their genes, and most folks can’t easily change where they live or work or reduce the amount of air pollution in their environment on their own (except for quitting smoking). However, there are plenty of ways you can strengthen and protect your hair and maintain your scalp for optimal hair growth.

You Don’t Have to Live with Male Pattern Baldness. Call the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami Today.

If male pattern baldness continues to progress, as it most often does, the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami offers a range of effective surgical and non-surgical treatment options that can put the brakes on hair loss and restore a natural-looking, full head of hair. 

To learn more about the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami and how we can help you with your hair loss issues and concerns, schedule a hair loss evaluation today by contacting our clinic at 305-925-0222.

Is Baldness Linked with Aggressive Prostate Cancer?

Air Pollution and Male Pattern Baldness

Is Baldness Linked with Aggressive Prostate Cancer?Male pattern baldness, or androgenetic alopecia, is a hereditary condition which afflicts two-thirds or men by the age of 35. By age 50, over 85 percent of men will develop signs of pattern baldness. While your genes will determine whether you are predisposed to androgenetic alopecia, other factors can contribute to the progression and degree of hair loss caused by the condition. Stress, poor diet, certain medications and treatments, and trauma are all non-genetic issues which can further weaken or destroy already vulnerable follicles. So too can the air pollution that surrounds all of us.

Air pollution is the source of a range of health problems, such as respiratory ailments, sinus issues, and allergies. The toxins in the air caused by industry, cars, fossil fuels, and other human activity shorten life spans and add billions of dollars to health care costs. Those same toxins that wreak havoc by entering the body and bloodstream can also cause harm when they come into contact with our skin, including our scalp and hair.  

Large suspended particles, small airborne particles, smoke and gaseous pollution settle on the scalp and hair where they can cause scalp irritation, redness, itching, excessive sebum secretion, and dandruff. Those pollutants can also damage hair follicles themselves, leading to hair loss. This irritation and damage can both mimic the symptoms of and contribute to androgenetic alopecia.

Studies have shown that various toxins, chemicals and carcinogens found in polluted air (and tobacco smoke) can hurt keratins, which are the proteins that form the foundation of hair structure. When keratins are damaged, hair can become weak and brittle, causing hair growth to slow down and eventually compromising the follicles so much that they die and fall out.

Men with androgenetic alopecia can’t change their genes, and most folks can’t easily change where they live or work or reduce the amount of air pollution in their environment on their own (except for quitting smoking). However, there are plenty of ways you can strengthen and protect your hair and maintain your scalp for optimal hair growth.

You Don’t Have to Live with Male Pattern Baldness. Call the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami Today.

If male pattern baldness continues to progress, as it most often does, the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami offers a range of effective surgical and non-surgical treatment options that can put the brakes on hair loss and restore a natural-looking, full head of hair. 

To learn more about the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami and how we can help you with your hair loss issues and concerns, schedule a hair loss evaluation today by contacting our clinic at 305-925-0222.

Hair Transplants- Safe for Teenagers?

Children’s Hair Loss: What You Need to Know

Children's Hair LossIt can be hard to be a kid sometimes. Things can be even more difficult for a child who is losing their hair. Feeling different, being picked on, teased, or bullied because of hair loss can be devastating and disruptive for a child. But there are solutions that can address this issue, which is more common than you might think.

It is estimated that approximately 3 percent of all pediatrician visits annually involve a hair loss problem. Young children as well as teenagers can experience the symptoms of thinning, balding, or shedding which we normally associate with male pattern baldness in adult men.

There are many reasons a child could suffer from hair loss, and you should always consult with a physician if you notice your child losing hair. Some of the most common causes of hair loss in children include:

Alopecia Areata

Alopecia Areata is a specific type of baldness that occurs in concentrated, rounded areas. It may occur on the scalp or on other portions of the body. At times, Alopecia Areata may manifest itself in several locations at once. For example, hair loss may simultaneously occur on the crown of the head, the sides of the head, and on the arm.

It is estimated that somewhere between 1-2% of Americans suffer with Alopecia Areata, including children.

Tinea capitis

This unpleasant infection, commonly called ringworm of the scalp, is a frequent culprit in children’s hair loss. It often appears as round or oval scaly patches of hair loss on the scalp. It can usually be treated with anti-biotics.

Hairstyle Issues

If a child or teenager applies an unnatural and excessive amount of tension to their hair over an extended period of time, it can cause a condition known as traction alopecia. For example, wearing unnecessarily tight ponytails, pigtails, or braids for a long period of time can cause hair to become damaged and fall out. Since this condition is a behavioral one as opposed to a genetic condition, it can be easily remedied simply by identifying and halting the behaviors that cause it.

Unconscious Hair Pulling and Plucking

Another behavioral cause of children’s hair loss, albeit one with a psychological component, is Trichotillomania. This disorder occurs when a child or teenager pulls their hair until it is uprooted, often leaving large areas of thin hair, damaged follicles, or total baldness. The best course of treatment for this type of hair loss is to consult a mental health professional or behavioral therapist to learn more about why the behavior is occurring, and how behavioral modification can be implemented to reduce this harmful conduct.

Poor Diet

If a child is malnourished or has an unhealthy diet, their body will have a hard time getting the macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals it needs to maintain healthy hair. While eating well may not be enough to reverse pattern baldness, eating foods for healthy hair can certainly help to improve the health and longevity of existing hair.

Learn More About Hair Loss and Restoration

Schedule a hair loss evaluation to learn more about effective treatment with the world-renowned experts at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Please contact our clinic today at 305-925-0222.

women's hair loss

How Does Men and Women’s Hair Loss Differ?

women's hair lossFor decades, stand-up comedians have made jokes about the differences between men and women. While losing hair is no laughing matter, and men and women’s hair loss share commonalities, there are a few important distinctions between the causes, manifestations, and treatment depending on sex.

Causes

We’ll start with what men and women’s hair loss has in common. The reasons behind pattern baldness in both sexes largely come down to something we all share: genetics. Over 95 percent of hair loss cases in men and women are caused by androgenetic alopecia, a hereditary hair loss condition that affects over 3 million Americans annually.

As the name implies, androgenic alopecia involves hormones called androgens. These hormones, which include testosterone, play an important part in male sexual development. They also play a central role in hair growth for both sexes. Testosterone produces a by-product known as dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Men and women who suffer from pattern baldness have a genetic sensitivity to DHT that results in shrinking hair follicles, which ultimately stop producing viable hair to replace the hair that we all lose on a regular basis.

Additional factors distinct to women can also lead to hair loss, such as hormonal and other changes caused by menopause.

Manifestations

Androgenetic alopecia may share a common origin in men and women, but the distinct ways in which androgenetic alopecia typically manifests itself – and how that impacts when hair loss is first noticed – is perhaps the biggest difference between the sexes when it comes to hair loss.

Men are more likely to notice and experience pattern baldness earlier than women. A quarter of American men see symptoms of male pattern baldness before the age of 21, approximately 66 percent of men experience some degree of loss by the age of 35, and 85 percent of men see significant thinning related to androgenetic alopecia by age 50. Most women, however, do not notice any signs of thinning or balding hair until the age of 50 or 60, long after the condition has already begun.  

This gap between when men and women typically notice they have a problem with hair loss is due to the different ways men and women typically lose hair as a result of androgenetic alopecia. In men, androgenetic alopecia follows a relatively predictable and familiar pattern that starts with shedding in the frontal hairline. This leads to more pronounced hair loss across the top of the head, and finally toward the crown. Since this hair loss in men occurs in distinct areas of the scalp, it is relatively easy to see it happening while it is happening

In women, however, androgenetic alopecia progresses differently. Instead of losing hair in isolated areas, women’s hair loss tends to occur throughout the scalp, resulting in thinning hair that can be more difficult to detect than a receding hairline or bald spot on the top of the head. Fortunately. there are warning signs of hair loss in women that facilitate faster action. Early detection is critical, as all medical therapies are most effective if initiated in the earlier stages of hair loss.

Treatment

A wide range of treatments can be used to address both men and women’s hair loss. The nature and degree of hair loss in the individual patient help determine the most effective treatment. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we have developed a comprehensive, holistic approach to evaluating and treating patients with hair loss, and leverage the very latest scientific advancements at our state-of-the art facility.

 

For men and women alike, the first step towards addressing hair loss is arranging for an evaluation as soon as possible. Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of restoring your hair — and regaining your confidence. Let us help you reclaim a healthy, vibrant, and full head of hair. Schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami today by calling 305.925.0222. We look forward to assisting you.

The Benefits of ARTAS® Hair Transplants

Long gone are the days of hair “plugs” – at least among prominent surgeons who employ the most advanced technologies and systems. Today, surgeons use cutting-edge techniques like the Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) or Follicular Isolation (FIT) to harvest healthy follicles and remove the tell-tale signs of transplants. Facilitated by ARTAS® technology, a 3d physician-guided robotic system that sustains donor graft quality and eliminates linear scars, hair transplants are a natural-looking solution for hereditary hair loss conditions like androgenic alopecia.

During ARTAS hair transplants, the donor area from which follicular units are harvested is trimmed down to allow for proper digital imaging. After administering a local anesthetic, the doctor activates a robotic arm that pinpoints which follicular units to target, regularly re-positioning itself to extract only the most powerful grafts. Rather than harvest large patches that look unnatural when implanted, the machine collects donor hair in a random pattern to preserve the patient’s original appearance at the donor site. After adequate hair is gathered, the grafts are transplanted in a planned and personalized pattern. The entire process takes around four to eight hours and most patients can return to their normal activities after a few days. The transplanted grafts then grow as permanent hairs with substantial growth appearing around six to nine months following the procedure.

Consider the following reasons ARTAS hair transplants deliver optimal hair restoration results:

  • Because ARTAS hair transplants are minimally-invasive, both the donor and recipient areas heal quickly. The transplant “takes” in about three days. Small scabs are normal and can be gently rubbed off after a few days. In about a week, your scalp’s appearance returns to normal.
  • Transplanted hair grows gradually and naturally to prevent a sudden or obvious change in appearance. Optimal growth usually materializes around nine months after surgery.
  • ARTAS hair transplants are outpatient procedures that require only a local anesthetic. Numbing eliminates any pain during the procedure, and mild swelling or discomfort afterwards typically subsides in one to three days.
  • ARTAS harvesting eliminates linear scars, which means patients can wear their hair in practically any style or length.
  • After extraction, digital imaging is used to analyze distinct growth patterns and construct the most natural-looking design for implantation. Developed by Dr. Paul Rose and Dr. Bernard Nusbaum, the Mosaic® Hair Restoration technique delivers remarkably tailored results.
  • Previous hair transplants with obvious linear scars can be disguised using the ARTAS system.
  • ARTAS hair transplants offer unparalleled precision, uniformity, accuracy and personalization during FUE procedures. There’s no room for human fatigue or error; every graft is as qualified as the first.
  • Results are designed to last a lifetime.

Dr. Paul Rose and Dr. Bernard Nusbaum of the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami are ISHRS Golden Follicle Award Winners who are continuously recognized for their insightful hair loss research, revolutionary transplant techniques and high patient satisfaction. We invite new patients to schedule a free consultation at 877-443-9070 to evaluate your hair loss, rule out any underlying conditions and discuss a personalized treatment path to restore hair and reestablish lost self-confidence.

prevent male pattern baldness

Can You Prevent Male Pattern Baldness?

prevent male pattern baldnessMany individuals are concerned about going bald later in life. To some degree, male pattern baldness (MPB) affects two-thirds of men by the time they reach age 35. By age 50, around 85 percent suffer noticeable thinning or balding. The odds of developing hair loss at an older age are high – so what can you do to prevent male pattern baldness or androgenic alopecia?

Androgenic alopecia is an often devastating and emotionally grim condition to cope with, despite how prevalent it is among men today. Although certain medications, immune problems, cancer treatments and traumas can cause hair loss, male-pattern baldness is hereditary. Those who experience MPB have follicles that are inherently sensitive to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a byproduct of testosterone that causes hair follicles to miniaturize. Once these follicles shrink to a severe extent, regrowth is challenging. But, early intervention can slow or stop the miniaturization process altogether.

Consider the following treatments which can help prevent male pattern baldness progression.

Minimize Your Stress

Although you can’t change your genetics, you can adapt your lifestyle to avoid circumstances that exacerbate hair loss. Serious stress or emotional trauma can render hair follicles inactive. Unlike normal hair growth, more hairs enter the resting phase (catagen) at once and fall out (exogen) in larger numbers about three months following a tense event. If you’re already predisposed to male pattern baldness, high stress interferes with whatever partial hair growth remains. Managing anxiety through meditation and a healthy work-life balance lessens your odds of abrupt shedding. Trying to prevent male pattern baldness from escalating is a stressful situation alone. If you already suffer from noticeable hair loss, seeking treatment early on reduces negative emotions by restoring self-confidence.  

Improve Your Physical Health

Changing your diet and starting an exercise regimen has a profound impact on your internal health, which can help prevent male pattern baldness severity. Studies show that older men with a higher cardiorespiratory fitness level release almost half as much cortisol as men who aren’t in healthy form.¹ Cortisol is the stress hormone believed to be linked with sudden hair shedding. When it comes to non-hereditary hair loss – which can strike alongside male pattern baldness and make matters worse – maintaining healthy hormone levels with exercise and good nutrition can enable healthy growth.

Create a Better Environment for Hair Growth

Low-level laser therapy, or LLLT, is a non-invasive technique used to stimulate underactive hair follicles. Through phototherapy, laser diodes interact with the scalp to promote better blood flow, helping follicles function properly. In some instances, LLLT helps prevent male pattern baldness from advancing. At-home laser caps can be used alongside other hair loss treatments, including prescriptions and topical foams. LLLT can also be used in conjunction with hair transplant surgery to reduce inflammation and nourish follicles for better results. Hair is stronger, thicker and more resilient to everyday damage.

Despite your genetics, hair loss does not have to become your destiny. To learn more about how to prevent male pattern baldness from worsening, or to discuss treatment options, call the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami at 305-925-0222. Through understanding, education and highly-effective treatment methods, we are determined to help patients attain a fuller head of hair and positive outlook on life.

 

¹ http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0141970

5 Benefits of an FUE Hair Transplant

Is Hair Health Important?

hair healthFor many men and women, hair health is not a priority. Their haircare routine is typically straightforward: shampoo, maybe conditioner and perhaps a little styling spray to look put together. Others take their hair health more seriously, particularly individuals who suffer from embarrassing hair loss conditions. But, does hair health truly matter?

The answer is multifaceted. Hair is a complex structure and has its own anatomy just like any other part of your body. At the base of hair – underneath the skin – there are living cells that work arduously to sustain growth, strength and shine. Therefore, the hair you see is often a reflection of your vitality and overall well-being. Improving the health of your hair isn’t just about looking great, it’s also about strengthening and supporting each strand from root to tip.

Hair Anatomy

Each strand, or shaft, is anchored by a follicle. The follicle is a tubular pouch just underneath the skin’s surface. Two sheaths surround the follicle to protect the shaft. The outer sheath runs alongside the sebaceous gland, which produces oils that naturally condition hair and give it its natural sheen. The outer sheath connects to the arrector pili muscle, and when contracted, causes hair to stand up – an effect more commonly known as goosebumps.

At the base of the follicle is known as the bulb, where cells build and nourish the shaft. These cells are connected to tiny blood vessels, or capillaries, which deliver hormones and nourishment to sustain healthy hair growth. When your body’s hormones are off balance or shifting as you age, the cells can’t re-build new shafts to replace everyday shedding. This is a condition known as androgenetic alopecia, also called male-pattern baldness of female pattern hair loss (FPHL).

Meanwhile, the shaft is made of a hard protein called keratin. The hair you see on your head, arms or legs is dead and no longer nourished by the follicle and its cells. Although it’s not living, the shaft is convoluted. Sometimes, an inner layer called the medulla is present, but this portion only exists in certain types of hair. The middle layer (which everyone has) is called the cortex, containing pigment to help give your hair its natural shade. The outer layer is called the cuticle. Most everyday hair care products designed to smooth or soften hair target the cuticle. Cuticle structure varies based on your hair type which can affect hair’s appearance. For instance, people with curly hair have drier, dull strands because sebum has a difficult time traveling down the kinks of the cuticle to condition shafts properly.

Why Hair Health Matters

Your hair has both cultural and social significance, which is why so many men and women who suffer from hereditary hair loss experience shame and discomfort with their appearances. Despite how much information we know about hair and its biological variations, human beings innately favor physical attributes in one another (and themselves) that suggest better health. One of these physical attributes is strong and voluminous hair.

It’s important to note that not everyone lacks beautiful, big hair because they aren’t healthy. While hair loss is sometimes indicative of an underlying health concern, most hair loss cases are due to predetermined genetics and hormonal fluctuations. Even pregnancy, one of the most natural (albeit magnificent) processes a woman’s body can undergo, modifies hair’s growth and form. Despite what human beings perceive, thinning and shedding doesn’t always indicate something is fundamentally wrong with your body. But, the emotional toll of hair loss certainly makes it feel that way.

If you suffer from androgenetic alopecia or another hair loss condition, improving your appearance by counteracting your hair loss can be a life changing experience. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we help hair loss patients boost their self-assurance by restoring hair to reflect the way they truly feel on the inside – strong, fit and vibrant. Call us at 305-925-0222 to schedule your hair loss consultation in Miami today.

Ludwig Classification

The 4 Most Common Hair Loss Conditions

Ludwig ClassificationHair loss conditions do not discriminate. Despite how often we hear about male pattern baldness, women account for 40 percent of cases. Overall, 3 million Americans suffer from androgenetic alopecia, or hereditary hair loss, annually.

According to the American Hair Loss Association, approximately 95 percent of men’s hair loss is due to male pattern baldness, and 25 percent see symptoms before they reach 21-years-old.¹ Two-thirds of men experience some degree of loss by the age of 35. And by the time they hit 50, 85 percent of men see significant thinning related to androgenetic alopecia.

Meanwhile, half of all women experience thinning or shedding by the time they reach 50-years-old, per the North American Hair Research Society.² While female pattern hair loss (FHPL) can begin any time after puberty, most women either see thinning in their teens and 20s or in their 40s and 50s.

The medical community continues to work toward cutting edge treatments that satisfy each of the leading hair loss conditions, but it’s important to remember how much these disorders vary. Not only are men and women affected differently, but another three major hair loss conditions exist beyond androgenetic alopecia.

Alopecia Areata

Around 200,000 cases of alopecia areata are diagnosed per year. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder characterized as sudden bald patches that appear almost overnight, sometimes resulting in complete bodily hair loss. Although there is no cure for alopecia areata, patients are wise to address any underlying conditions related to their immune systems. Topical treatments can also help alleviate some of the hair loss associated with alopecia.  

Telogen Effluvium

Another leading hair loss type is telogen effluvium (TE), or stress-induced hair loss, which affects around 200,000 people in the United States per year alone. After a strenuous life event, hair follicles react to external strain by going into shock. While normal hairs enter their active and resting phase on a continuous cycle, patients with telogen effluvium have follicles pushed into their resting state prematurely. A few weeks or months later, patients may notice their hair falling out in clumps because the follicles aren’t active to reproduce recurrently lost hairs. Fortunately, telogen effluvium is a reversible condition that rarely requires aggressive medical intervention. However, TE can become a chronic ailment if the underlying causes of stress aren’t addressed properly. Chronic telogen effluvium most often affects women between 30- and 60-years old, per the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology.³ However, patients rarely see total hair loss during these fluctuating periods of on-and-off symptoms.

Traction Alopecia

Traction alopecia occurs when hairs are externally pulled out of the follicle from tight hairstyles or as an active response to anxiety or depression. Cornrows, tight braids and hair pieces can trigger traction alopecia symptoms, which then subside when hair is loosened and follicles begin to heal. For individuals suffering with mental disorders such as depression, a combination of therapy and counseling can provide a new outlet to minimize purposeful traction alopecia and other self-harm behaviors.

 

If you are experiencing symptoms of hair loss beyond the normal 50 to 100 strands per day, it’s time to contact a hair restoration specialist. At your consultation, Dr. Paul Rose and Dr. Bernard Nusbaum of the renowned Hair Transplant Institute of Miami will examine you for the common hair loss conditions. From there, we discuss possible underlying causes and recommend treatment, if necessary. As a leading hair loss clinic, we pride ourselves on active listening, open communication and optimal treatment plans. Call us today at 305-925-0222 to schedule your appointment.

 

¹ http://www.americanhairloss.org/men_hair_loss/

² http://www.nahrs.org/PatientInformation(FAQs)/FemalePatternHairLoss(FAQ).aspx

³ http://www.aocd.org/?page=TelogenEffluviumHA

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