Articles Tagged with: male hair loss

Will Dandruff Cause Hair Loss?

Will Dandruff Cause Hair Loss?It’s estimated that dandruff affects nearly 1 in 2 adults across the United States and Europe. But will dandruff cause hair loss? Like scalp folliculitis, dandruff is a condition that affects the scalp. However, dandruff is a unique condition with different symptoms and side effects. Read this article to learn more about dandruff causes, as well as the risk for developing hair loss when the scalp becomes dry and flaky.

Is Hair Loss Caused by Dandruff?

To date, there is no clinical evidence suggesting that hair loss is caused by dandruff. However, anecdotal evidence among physicians suggests a possible correlation. That is to say, patients who experience dandruff also exhibit signs of hair loss. Before exploring treatment options, take a moment to review a few important facts about dandruff and hair loss.

  1. Dandruff is simply a visible sign that the skin cells of the scalp are producing new cells faster than normal. This results in excessive shedding of dead skin cells, which fall from the scalp as dandruff flakes. Dandruff can affect you in both the long-term and short-term, often forming as a side effect of another health or skin condition (see below).
  1. Dandruff is also a symptom of the following common skin conditions:
  • Eczema
  • Psoriasis
  • Stress
  • Seborrhic dermatitis
  • Vitamin B Deficiency
  1. Sometimes, a hair loss medication may cause dandruff. Minoxidil is one medication that may cause hair loss. Most often available under the brand name Rogaine®, this topical foam contains alcohol, which may dry the scalp and increase dandruff flakes.

How to Treat Dandruff and Hair Loss

Fortunately, there are treatments available for men and women who experience dandruff and hair loss. Special shampoos, laser therapy, and hair restoration surgery are just a few examples of the complementary treatments available to reverse the signs of both conditions.

Dandruff Treatment

Most hair loss experts and dermatologists agree that dandruff is easy to treat. Often times, patients can see fast and long lasting results with an over the counter shampoo designed specifically to treat the symptoms of dandruff. Alternatively, some individuals notice dandruff symptoms subside after adding just a few drops of tea tree oil to their shampoo. For others, especially those who have very light dandruff, a vigorous scalp massage while showering is enough to loosen and clear away dandruff flakes. Only a dermatologist or hair loss professional knows which option will be best for you, making it essential to consult a professional.

Hair Loss Treatment

Although topical hair loss foams like Rogaine® can worsen dandruff symptoms, prescription medications like Propecia® are a relatively safe bet. Some men experience sexual side effects while using Propecia®, however, leading many patients to try laser therapy with Capillus® as an alternative. Surgical hair restoration is another option to restore the appearance of hairlines, crowns, and other areas affected by pattern baldness.

Treating Dandruff and Hair Loss in Miami

Treat dandruff, before it has the chance to cause hair loss. Today, a variety of treatment protocols are available to help nourish the scalp, reduce flaking, and promote natural hair growth.

To learn more about treating dandruff and reversing hair loss, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami online or call 305-925-0222.

7 Summer Foods for Healthy Hair

7 Summer Foods for Healthy HairCelebrate the summer season by incorporating some all-natural ingredients into your diet. Most people avoid rich and heavy meals during the summer because they don’t provide hydration and tend to promote sluggishness.

During the hot summer, the last thing you desire is bloating or dehydration, especially on the beach. Organic and fresh foods naturally have a lighter, more refreshing taste compared to processed meals.

Consider these seven light, summery snacks that are full of nutrients to keep hair strong and shiny.

Foods That Protect Hair from Summer Sun Damage

Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is an excellent cooking ingredient, beauty balm, and natural flavoring all in one. Apply topically for beauty purposes, spread on toast, use as a cooking spray, or drizzle onto your favorite popcorn and you’ve eliminated the unhealthy saturated fats otherwise found in butter. Coconut oil can be added to your morning coffee for an extra boost of energy, too. Mix with sea salt to create a facial scrub, shea butter for a heavy moisturizer, or scoop it plain before your shower as a do-it-yourself hair mask!

Blueberries

The USDA Human Nutrition Center (HNRCA) named blueberries number one in antioxidants compared to 40 well-known fruits and vegetables. Not only are blueberries great for your hair, they also prevent oxidative stress on the body that potentially leads to aging, heart diseases, and cancer. Try adding some frozen blueberries to your favorite smoothie, or sprinkling fresh berries on top of your low fat Greek yogurt. Why Greek? The extra protein keeps hair strong and full.

Oysters and Fresh Fish

If you’re headed to the coast this summer, order up some fresh oysters. They are full of zinc, which is an essential nutrient for hair cell renewal and repair. Other types of fish, notably salmon, provide high doses of omega-3 fatty acids. Without these healthy fats, hair is susceptible to breakage and dryness. Instead of grilling up your typical burgers and steaks this summer, try grilling salmon on a cedar plank as a lighter, fitter alternative.

Kiwis

As a tropical delicacy, kiwis are deliciously refreshing and sweet. These small, fuzzy fruits are full of vitamin C and antioxidants to keep hair follicles thriving, combat wrinkles, and keep strong bones and teeth. Bonus: antioxidants found in kiwi can help you fight cancerous cells and heart disease.

Watermelon

Although watermelon has high water content, it also manages to pack in a dense nutrient profile. Just one cup holds 17 percent of the daily-recommended Vitamin A and 21 percent of Vitamin C in only 43 calories to help you keep your waistline trim. Vitamin A keeps the scalp from flaking and promotes healthy collagen cells to keep your hair shiny and strong. Other nutrients in watermelon include thiamin, vitamin B-6, magnesium, pantothenic acid, potassium, zinc, selenium, choline, niacin, and riboflavin. Watermelon is 92 percent water, which helps keep you hydrated while snacking. Dehydration leads to brittle, thinning hair, and an overall tired appearance.

Spinach

Prefer a light dinner in the summertime? Instead of iceberg lettuce, use spinach leaves, which are high in iron. Leafy greens like spinach allow red blood cells to carry oxygen to hair follicles and keep the healthy hair growth phases in action. Skip the tortilla strips and use lentils as a crunchy topping instead – they are full of biotin, which is a well known hair health vitamin.

Tomatoes

Rich in lycopene, beta-carotene, and Vitamin C, tomatoes defend against skin and hair damages. Try grilling them alongside your salmon. Cooking releases more lycopene than raw tomatoes contain. Even ketchup contains a higher dose of lycopene, but opt for organic, low-sugar versions as toppings at your next barbeque.

In some cases, nutrient deficiency is not the cause for hair loss. When you need to go beyond a healthy diet and undergo more aggressive treatment for hair loss conditions such as male pattern baldness, consider Mosaic™ Hair Restoration. Unique grafting and positioning allows experts at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami to restore your appearance.

Learn More About Hair Restoration in Miami

For more information on hair restoration, contact our office at (877) 443-9070. Alternatively, you can fill out our hair loss evaluation form to understand your personal hair loss and jumpstart your hair growth journey.

Is Hair Loss a Side Effect of Smoking?

Is Hair Loss a Side Effect of Smoking?Lung cancer is usually the first side effect that comes to mind when considering the harms of smoking cigarettes. But lung cancer isn’t the only problem associated with smoking; stroke, brain damage, tooth decay, cataracts, loss of smell and taste, and other cancers affecting the nose, lip, tongue, and mouth are also potential internal ailments following long-term smoking. Consider also the external side effects of smoking, which include premature aging, skin damage, and hair loss.

The Prevalence of Smoking in America

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), tobacco is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in the United States (i). More than 480,000 deaths are caused by smoking each year in America, with more than 41,000 attributed to the inhalation of secondhand smoke.

Even though it’s been widely advertised as a harmful and potentially deadly habit, 17.8 percent of U.S. adults still smoke cigarettes. About 76% of those, or about 32 million, continue to smoke everyday, significantly increasing their risk for tobacco-related diseases.

Smoking and Hair Loss

Inhaling cigarette smoke exposes the human body to over 4,000 chemicals, including 43 known carcinogenic compounds. Nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, arsenic, and DDT are all present in some of the biggest tobacco brands. Given the high exposure to such toxins, the body reacts in a variety of different ways to tobacco inhalation.

Here are the top four reasons smoking causes hair loss:

  1. Smoking reduces circulation to the scalp, which inhibits follicle revitalization and hair growth.
  1. Smoking cigarettes pollutes the blood with toxins that target your body’s natural cycles.
  1. According to the Department of Dermatology at the University Hospital of Zurich in Switzerland, cigarettes may disrupt function of hair follicle (ii).
  1. Oxidative stress caused by cigarette smoking is also tied to hair loss. Free radicals from smoking cause damage at the cellular level, decrease cell motility, and increase cell senescence, which is used to describe a live, but inactive cell that can no longer divide and proliferate. The aforementioned processes are all necessary for hair regrowth, and a lack of oxygen caused by smoking deters them.

Preventing Hair Loss from Smoking

If you are a smoker, quitting will not only help you maintain a full head of hair, but also allow your body to continue its natural biological processes without toxic disruption. You’ll be doing your internal organs, skin, hair follicles, and stress levels a favor by cutting out nicotine and tobacco products before they have the chance to take hold of your health.

Within just 20 minutes of quitting smoking, your blood pressure, pulse rate and temperature return to normal levels. In 48 hours, damaged nerve endings caused by smoking begin to regrow, along with a heightened sense of smell and taste. In one year, your risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart attack are less than half of a nonsmoker, and in 20 years you are at the same risk of lung disease and cancers as an individual who has never smoked at all.

Quit Smoking Today

If you want to quit smoking but lack the resources, many advocacy groups like Tobacco Free Florida help residents statewide access the tools to cease their tobacco habits, regardless of socioeconomic status. They offer a toll-free “quitline” at 1-877-U-CAN-NOW (1-877-822-6669), where smokers can speak to a Quit Coach who develops a plan toward your smoke-free lifestyle. You can also receive in-person coaching at one of their locations or speak to a representative online. Tobacco Free Florida’s services are free, allowing everyone willing to take the path toward health the chance to get involved.

Treating Hair Loss from Smoking

Although your internal health greatly improves the longer you’ve been a non-smoker, some side effects don’t reverse back to normal without outside help. If you’re suffering from hair loss as a side effect from long-term tobacco use, consider hair restoration treatment(s).

Topical treatments, prescription medications, hair transplant surgery, and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) devices are all viable treatments for smoking-induced hair loss. To receive a personalized plan, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our expert surgeons can help you diminish hair damage and thinning after smoking, allowing you to feel just as fresh and revitalized on the outside as you do on the inside.

Don’t let your appearance reflect unhealthy choices from the past. Contact Miami Hair at (877) 443-9070 or email drnusbaum@miamihair.com for your personalized treatment program.

Sources:

(i) http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/campaign/tips/resources/data/cigarette-smoking-in-united-states.html

(ii) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12673073

How Thyroid Disease May Cause Hair Loss

How Thyroid Disease May Cause Hair LossHair health, fullness, and sheen are often indicators of the body’s internal wellness. Many diseases, conditions, and subsequent treatments trigger hair loss or dull, breaking strands. Two of those conditions are hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism. While they are complete opposite in terms of their issues – one is an overproduction while the other is an underproduction of hormones – they share a common symptom: hair loss.

If you suffer from a thyroid disorder and are currently experiencing hair loss or balding, knowing why and the steps you can take to combat this unfortunate side effect is important.

What is the thyroid?

The thyroid is a gland that releases a steady amount of hormones in the body. It’s pertinent to proper metabolic functions, growth, and development. The thyroid is located just below your voice box on the front of your neck. It is shaped somewhat like a butterfly with two lobes on each side connected in the center by a thin tissue. The thyroid stores hormones in small droplets within it’s vesicles, or follicles.

What does it do?

The thyroid is responsible for the production of three key hormones: T3 (also known as triiodothyronine), T4 (also known as Tetreaiodothyronine), and Calcitonin. T3 and T4 are both made up mainly of iodine.

Being the main component of two thyroid hormones, the thyroid requires iodine to function properly. Usually, the body absorbs iodine through the intestine and enters the blood stream. Then, it’s transferred to the thyroid gland to build T3 and T4. The body cannot produce iodine on it’s own since it’s a trace element.

One reason for an underactive thyroid, or hypothyroidism, is a lack of iodine. Other potential causes are genetics, age, Hasimoto’s thyroiditis, and various medications. Under-activity usually develops over time, rendering it hard to notice. The symptoms are weight gain, slowed metabolism, loss of energy, tiredness, difficulty concentrating, slow pulse, constipation, and hair loss. Many patients with an underactive thyroid assume their symptoms are part of the aging process, rather than a serious hormonal condition.

Hyperthyroidism, on the other hand, occurs from an overproduction of hormones in the thyroid gland. Energy metabolism speeds up and overactive thyroids lead to hot flashes, trembling, insomnia, racing heart, fatigue, diarrhea, weight loss, and hair loss.

Autoimmune diseases, issues with the thyroid axis, or autonomy from the pituitary gland are the three main causes of an overactive thyroid. The pituitary gland is responsible for regulating the amount of thyroid hormone produced, and a lack of communication between the two can cause overproduction.

Why does a dysfunctional thyroid lead to hair loss?

Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can cause hair loss. First, overactive thyroids sometimes lead to an increased development of DHT. DHT influences the development of sexual organs and secondary sexual characteristics, including physical appearance. But too much DHT can cause hair follicle shrinkage or elimination, resulting in shedding or thinning hair. Therefore, when an overactive thyroid impairs the production of DHT from testosterone, balding occurs.

For patients currently prescribed medication for an underactive thyroid, it’s important to note the side effects. One of the most common treatments is levothyroxine sodium, which also goes by the brand names Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid, and Unithroid. Sythroid specifically has been shown to cause long-term hair loss in patients.

How to treat thyroid-related hair loss

Whether you’re suffering from hair loss due to a hormonal imbalance from hypothyroidism or your thyroid medication is causing your hair loss, you have options for treatment.

First, many individuals take additional medication to offset the hair loss from their current thyroid medication. Results vary since medication affects every individual differently, but make sure to consult your physician prior to adding or subtracting from your current regimen.

Hair transplant surgery is another treatment option known to deliver consistent results. Given the advances in hair transplants, such as the Follicular Isolation Technique (FIT) developed by Dr. Paul Rose, transplants are more naturally looking than ever. Using FIT, Dr. Rose extracts individual follicles from donor areas and moves them to balding areas with little scarring. Follicular Unit Transplantations (FUT) is a more traditional approach offered by many restoration experts, including the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami.

Many individuals aren’t candidates for additional medication or hair transplant surgery after suffering from thyroid-related hair loss. Low-level laser therapy, or LLLT, uses safe lasers to stimulate hair follicles. At-home laser caps can be worn underneath virtually any hat or covering.

Learn More About Hair Loss Treatment in Miami

If you’re suffering from hair loss related to an underactive or overactive thyroid, the Hair Transplant Institute can help. We offer a variety of treatment options, customized to individual conditions, to revert this unfortunate side effect of thyroid dysfunction. Visit Miami Hair online, or contact our institute at 305-925-0222 to learn more about our personalized approach to hair loss diagnosis and treatment.

Miami Hair Surgeons Perform Hair Transplant for Alan Tacher

miami-hair-surgeons-perform-hair-transplant-alan-tacherDespierta América star, Alan Tacher, visits Drs. Nusbaum and Rose

There’s never a dull moment at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Just a couple weeks ago, our Coral Gables clinic received a visit from Univision celebrity and Despierta América star, Alan Tacher!

Like millions of men, Mr. Tacher has been experiencing hair loss along his frontal hairline and the top portion of his scalp. In such a case, surgeons can extract donor hair follicles from the sides or rear of the scalp—where hair growth is still thick and full—and transplant them to the hairline and/or front of the scalp where things are getting thin.

Watch the Segment. Watch the televised segment below, courtesy of Despierta América.

Part 1: Hair Loss Q&A

Part 2: The Procedure

Part 3: The Results

Before and After Photos

Reasons to Love Miami Hair

Celebrities are not the only ones who love our Institute. Patients travel from around the world to take advantage of the expertise and advanced hair restoration technologies offered by Dr. Bernard Nusbaum and Dr. Paul Rose. Below are just a few of the reasons patients consistently choose the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami over other hair loss clinics and treatment options.

ARTAS™ Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE)

In 2012, our Institute become one of the first 11 hair clinics to offer the revolutionary ARTAS™ system for robotic FUE. ARTAS is widely considered to be one of the most advanced and effective tools for hair restoration surgery, using high resolution digital imaging and advanced robotics technology to extract near perfect donor hairs at micron-level precision.

Visit this page to learn more about the ARTAS™ hair restoration robot.

Mosaic® Hair Restoration

With or without a hair transplant robot, donor hairs must be surgically transplanted to the recipient area (portion of the scalp that is thinning or balding). This is where the surgeon’s skill and expertise separate the mediocre from the exceptional. At our Institute, surgeons use the patented Mosaic® Hair Restoration approach to ensure natural results that are nearly undetectable.

To learn more about the Mosaic® Hair Restoration, visit this page on hair transplant techniques.

Unparalleled Patient Care

Of course, your procedure is just a small portion of your overall experience at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our clinic specializes in patient-focused care before, during, and long after your procedure. Our staff, nurses, technicians, and surgeons offer follow up care that is second to none.

Visit Us for Your Consultation

If you suffer with hair loss, you are not alone. Millions of men and women wake up each day dissatisfied with their appearance. Happiness, self esteem, social ambition, and professional life can all suffer as a consequence. With today’s technologies and treatment options, there’s no reason to let hair loss compromise your quality of life.

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we hold your pursuit of a newer, fuller head of hair in the highest regard. We welcome you to contact us online to schedule a hair loss evaluation, our call our clinic directly at 305-925-0222.

Does Drinking Alcohol Cause Hair Loss?

Are alcohol and hair loss related? It’s a common question with a straightforward answer. In general, it is a myth that alcohol consumption causes your hair to fall out. Nevertheless, excessive alcohol consumption may cause serious long-term harm to the liver, nervous system, heart, stomach, and brain.

But why do so many men and women believe alcohol will cause hair loss? In this article, we address the myth that alcohol makes your hair fall out while exploring other ways drinking may hurt the health of the body.

Addressing the Myth of Alcohol and Hair Loss

Excessive amounts of alcohol is not healthy for the body. However, it is an overstatement to say, “Drinking alcohol causes hair loss.” There are many variables that contribute to thinning, shedding, and balding. Alcohol consumption alone is unlikely to be the reason a man or woman experiences hair loss, especially pattern baldness.

However, there are many ways that alcohol adversely affects the body and thus may contribute to weaker or thinner hair. They include the following:

Dehydration. Alcohol consumption lowers the natural level of anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) in the body. Naturally, ADH helps the body regulate hydration. As it tails off, the sensation to urinate develops, and the body starts expelling liquid.

Mineral Depletion. In addition to dehydrating the body, alcohol is known to lower the amount of important minerals in the body. Zinc and biotin are among the two most important to know, since both are important in the growth of naturally healthy hair.

Vitamin Depletion. Alcohol consumption is also linked with a decrease in vitamin levels, specifically C and A. Both vitamins play a key role in keeping the body healthy, so hair health can suffer when these vitamin stores are depleted.

Estrogen Production. Drinking alcohol is known to increase the production of estrogen. In both men and women, increased estrogen production can lead to hormonally-induced hair loss.

Stress. Indirectly, the stress caused by alcoholism, alcohol-induced accidents, and other related events might cause stress-related hair loss known as telogen effluvium. Telogen effluvium is a condition characterized by the early entrance of hair into the telogen phase of the hair growth cycle. During telogen phase, the hair follicle becomes dormant and new hair ceases to grow. Unlike other forms of hair loss, telogen effluvium is often temporary.

Treat Hair Loss at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami

To learn more about personalized hair loss diagnosis and treatment, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami online or call our clinic directly at 305-925-0222.

Is Baldness Linked with Aggressive Prostate Cancer?

Is Baldness Linked with Aggressive Prostate Cancer?Men who exhibit signs of balding may want to consider having a prostate exam sooner, rather than later. According to a new study published by the Journal of Clinical Oncology in late 2014, men who showed certain signs of baldness were more likely to develop an aggressive form of prostate cancer.

In the study, researchers point to two specific signs of baldness that men around age 45 should watch: Thinning frontal hairlines, and balding crowns. Based on the research, men who exhibited these signs of hair loss were up to 40% more like to develop prostate cancer compared to men of the same age who still had a full head of hair.

Diagnosis with the Norwood Classification

The Norwood Scale is a common method of diagnosing male pattern baldness. The scale maps the typical progression of hair loss in men, beginning with the slightest signs of thinning at the temporal regions (see Stage 1 below). In this study, the men who experienced a 40% greater risk of prostate cancer were classified as a Stage 3 or higher, using the chart above.

Is there cause for concern? According to one physician, the findings are probably not coincidental. However, more studies are needed to get a better idea of exactly how balding and prostate cancer might be linked. “The evidence is too provisional,” says Dr. Michael Cook, a senior study author and a National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigator. “We think that certain factors, such as genetics and male hormones, may underlie both [conditions]” (i).

Hair Loss Evaluation

For more information on hair loss evaluations in Miami, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami at 305-925-0222.

Sources

(i) http://www.forbes.com/sites/jonfortenbury/2014/09/16/a-specific-form-of-baldness-linked-to-aggressive-prostate-cancer/

Researchers Use Immune System to Trigger New Hair Growth in Mice

As the year comes to an end, yet another hair loss study has rocked the Internet with fascinating results! Just a couple weeks ago, researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre released findings that demonstrate how the immune system can be used to induce changes in the regenerative skin stem cells of laboratory mice. The study was published in PLOS Biology, and while follow up studies are needed, the hair loss community embraces these findings as much-welcomed insight on the potential for a “stem cell” hair loss cure.

Related news: Discovery of New Stem Cells May Hold Future Hair Loss Cure.

Commenting on the study, author Mirna Perez-Moreno explains, “We have discovered that macrophages[…] are also involved in the activation of hair follicle stem cells,” (i).

Macrophages are special immune system cells that play an important role in a process called phagocytosis. To protect the body, macrophages consume inbound pathogens while assisting in cellular repair (e.g. healing wounds). In the study conducted by the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, the macrophages had an additional and shocking effect on the hair follicles of lab mice.

The discovery began, at first, as a simple observation. While administering anti-inflammatory drugs, Perez-Moreno noticed that some mice experienced hair growth shortly after receiving the medication. This led her to hypothesize that the cells of the immune system might play a vital role in communicating with the hair follicle stem cells. To evaluate the hypothesis, the team tested several individual immune system cells to see if they had an effect on hair growth.

As researchers took note, one specific type of immune system cell did appear to play a causal role in activating stem cells within the hair follicle: The macrophages.

Summarizing the findings of the study, authors explain, “Our study underlines the importance of macrophages as modulators in skin regenerative processes, going beyond their primary function.”

Eventually, researchers hope to use findings like this to develop treatments in which stem cells can be “activated” to promote cellular regeneration. Such treatments could provide far-reaching benefits in the fight against terminal illnesses and other serious health conditions. For men and women who suffer with hair loss, stem cell therapy promises to one day “reactivate” hair follicles to reverse pattern baldness without foams, prescription medications, or hair transplant surgery.

Sources

(i) http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/287367.php

Discovery of New Stem Cells May Hold Future Hair Loss Cure

Researchers have long pursued the discovery of stem cell that could quickly and easily reverse the signs of hair loss. Such a cell would function as a proverbial “on/off switch,” giving hair loss physicians the ability to induce new hair growth across areas of bald skin. Men and women who suffer with androgenetic alopecia (pattern baldness) would not be the only benefactors; individuals who suffer hair loss following severe injuries, burns, or illnesses could also benefit from a quick and easy hair loss treatment protocol directed through a specific stem cell.

This December, a discovery at the University of Calgary indicates that researchers might be closer to this dream. Dr. Jeff Biernaskie, a Veterinary Medicine professor, published research findings in the December 2014 issue of the Developmental Cell journal that identify certain self-renewing cells located in the dermal sheath that play an integral role in managing hair growth. One day, hair loss professionals may be able to target these cells with specially formulated drugs to induce new hair growth in a precise and controlled fashion. Says Dr. Biernaskie, “We hope that we can ultimately stimulate these cells with drugs to replenish or rejuvenate the cells that are responsible for inducing hair growth,” (i). To understand how these self-renewing cells might someday cure hair loss, it’s helpful to first understand the role dermal papilla plays in overseeing normal hair growth.

The dermal papilla is a cluster of cells located at the base of the hair follicle. Dermatologists have long understood that this cluster of cells stimulates new hair growth via epidermal cells and the hair follicle. Exactly how the dermal papilla oversees this process, however, has largely remained a mystery until recently. Moreover, research indicates that dysfunctional dermal papilla are common among individuals with pattern baldness.

“When you lose your hair, particularly in male pattern baldness, we know the reason you go bald is because of dysfunction of[…] dermal papilla,” explains Dr. Biernaskie.

But what if certain neighboring cells could be used to resuscitate dormant dermal papilla? This question became the inspiration for the central hypothesis tested by Dr. Biernaskie and his research team. To identify these potential cells, the team used genetic markers to label individual cells within the dermal sheath. While monitoring the cells, the team made an exciting discovery: A small number of cells within the dermal sheath exhibited the ability to self-renew, creating new cells in each hair follicle. Those new cells included new dermal papilla, which ultimately have the power to facilitate new hair growth.

Commenting on the discovery, Dr. Biernaskie says, “We know that there is a small group of dermal stem cells in each follicle, we know where they reside[…] down the road, we might be able to look at different drugs that activate these cells[…] in order to stimulate new hair growth.”

Sources

(i) http://www.ucalgary.ca/utoday/issue/2014-12-10/stem-cell-discovery-sheds-new-light-hair-growth

Photobiomodulation and Hair Loss Treatment

What is photobiomodulation, and can it be effective in treating male and female hair loss? It’s a valid question, especially with so much online buzz surrounding the subject of laser hair restoration. The idea that laser therapy could somehow reverse the signs of balding seems too futuristic and flimsy to be reality. Studies indicate otherwise, however.

Below, we explore the technology, theory, and results achieved by low level laser therapy devices designed to treat hair loss.

LLHT for Hair Loss

Low level hair therapy (LLHT) is a hair loss treatment option that implements the use of safe, cool-to-the-touch lasers to reawaken dormant hair follicles. In medicine, this type of laser therapy is more broadly defined as phototherapy. Phototherapy has a wide range of medical applications, including the treatment of arthritis, lower back pain, and wound healing, among others.

More About Photobiomodulation

Given the correct application, LLHT devices are known to have an effect on the body that causes cells to act. Medical researchers believe this action is the result of a simple process: Laser light energizes the cells, and the cells respond by utilizing the energy. This process is thought to cause biological changes to both the cells and the surrounding tissue. The term photobiomodulation is used to explain those chemical and physical changes.

Treating Hair Loss

The study of photobiomodulation and hair loss is new; indeed, much needs to be explored before researchers can know exactly why low level laser therapy (LLLT) is effective in treating male and female hair loss. There are a couple hypotheses that might help to explain this phenomenon, however:

1. LLLT devices stimulate chemical reactions within the cells of the hair follicle, causing essential cells to reproduce and become re-engaged in the hair growth cycle.

2. Laser therapy devices extend the life of individual cells within the hair follicles, reprogramming them to support healthy hair growth.

Learn More About LLHT

The Hair Transplant Institute of Miami is pleased to offer safe, convenient options for low level hair therapy (LLHT). Readers are invited to learn more about the Capillus272® personal-use hair laser online, or call our clinic to schedule a hair loss evaluation with a professional at 305-925-0222.

Privacy Settings
We use cookies to enhance your experience while using our website. If you are using our Services via a browser you can restrict, block or remove cookies through your web browser settings. We also use content and scripts from third parties that may use tracking technologies. You can selectively provide your consent below to allow such third party embeds. For complete information about the cookies we use, data we collect and how we process them, please check our Privacy Policy
Youtube
Consent to display content from Youtube
Vimeo
Consent to display content from Vimeo
Google Maps
Consent to display content from Google