Articles Tagged with: hormonally induced hair loss

Hair Loss During Menopause: Causes, Symptoms, and Prevention

hair loss and menopauseHair loss is a lesser-known side effect of menopause. Most commonly, women and physicians associate menopause with other side effects like hot flashes, emotional swings, and significant menstrual cycle changes. Unfortunately, hair loss during menopause is a common occurrence that presents a very real threat to mental and emotional health.

Androgenetic alopecia, or pattern baldness, occurs differently in women than it does in men. Simply compare the Ludwig Classification (for female hair loss) with the Norwood Classification (for males), and the difference is quite clear. For men, pattern baldness typically begins with a receding hairline and progresses toward loss of hair at the crown of the head. For women, however, hair loss can be much more difficult to detect.

When a woman begins to lose hair, it usually happens in a more spread-out and diffuse manner along the top portion of the head. For this reason, many women do not recognize the [signs of female hair] loss until long after it has already begun.

With this in mind, here are 4 things to know and understand about hair loss during menopause.

Menopausal Hair Loss: 4 Things to Know

Hair Loss During Menopause is Hormonal

Hormonal fluctuations are known to cause hair loss in both men and women. For men, increased DHT production is usually the culprit responsible for the development of pattern baldness after age 40. Pregnant women sometimes experience the opposite, as pregnancy causes a surge in healthy hormones that can cause hair to become thick, rich, and vibrant.

During menopause, the body’s production of estrogen and other female hormones begins to decline. This causes a relative rise in androgens, or male hormones, which ultimate puts women at risk for developing hormonally induced hair loss.

Stress During Menopause Might Also Cause Thin Hair

Of course, hormones are not the only factor to consider. Certain elements of lifestyle might also contribute to hair loss during menopause. Most common is stress, which can lead to a specific type of hair loss referred to as telogen effluvium.

Telogen effluvium appears to occur when stress “shocks” the hair follicles into a dormant state in which hair no longer grows, according to the American Hair Loss Association. Taking proactive steps to reduce daily stress can help. Yoga, meditation, journaling, and quiet time alone are all activities that numerous studies associate with low levels of stress.

Psychological Effects of Hair Loss

Hair loss can cause serious mental and emotional health issues for both men and women. It’s vital to understand that such side effects are normal; the hair, face, and teeth are among the first characteristics one individual will notice about another. Together, they help to establish a first impression and, in some cases, a certain level of attraction. Not surprisingly, men and women can feel anxious, embarrassed, and depressed when the health and aesthetics of the face and hair are compromised.

There are two very important things to remember, however. First, stress has a way of exacerbating hair loss (see above). For this reason, women who notice symptoms of thinning, shedding, or balding during menopause are smart to remain calm and consult a physician. Second, women must remember that hair loss during menopause is treatable.

Menopausal Hair Loss is Treatable

There are a variety of treatment protocols available for women who notice thinning, shedding, or balding during menopause. When it comes to non-surgical hair restoration methods, Minoxidil (available by brand name Rogaine®) has been shown successful in halting hair loss for women. Minoxidil is a topical foam that must be applied to the scalp daily, however, which becomes tedious for some women.

Low level laser therapy for hair is a second non-surgical restoration method that has demonstrated an ability to reduce hair loss and, in some cases, stimulate new hair growth. LLLT exposes the scalp to safe, FDA-approved lasers that are designed to stimulate blood flow and nutrient delivery to the hair follicles. Women are particularly found of these “laser therapies for hair loss” because they are quick, convenient, safe, and effective.

Finally, women may elect to have a surgical hair restoration procedure to permanently reverse signs of hair loss. Surgical hair restoration is most commonly performed as a hair transplant, a procedure during which the patient’s own hair follicles are extracted from areas of healthy scalp and relocated to areas of thinning or balding. Surgeons transplant each follicular cluster (sometimes as small as 1-3 units) by hand, effectively camouflaging bald scalp with real hair that looks, feels, and grows naturally.

Early Detection, Successful Treatment

Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of restoring hair to its naturally full, resilient, and beautiful state. To move forward with a hair loss evaluation, schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our team represents South Florida’s finest surgeons, registered nurses, and technicians, each of whom hold your pursuit of a fuller head of hair in the highest regard.

Readers may also call our Institute at 305.925.0222 to speak directly with a member of our team.

Temporary Hair Loss: Is It Normal?

Temporary Hair Loss- Is It NormalIs there such a thing as temporary hair loss? The question itself seems counter-intuitive. Thanks largely to the myths and half-truths of American pop culture, hair loss is something we typically associate with old men, and it’s a condition that seems to be permanent and irreversible. This is only partly true, however. Thinning, shedding, and balding affect both men and women of various different ages. Moreover, not all hair loss is permanent. In some cases, hair might begin to re-grow naturally.

Still, it is imperative that men and women learn the difference between temporary hair loss and permanent pattern baldness, or androgenetic alopecia. On the one hand, research indicates that individuals who suffer with pattern baldness might also be genetically predisposed to other serious health conditions, like coronary heart disease. On the other hand, those who experience temporary hair loss are smart to diagnose it as such to avoid unnecessary stress and anxiety.

Join Dr. Bernard Nusbaum is the video below for a brief overview of the four main causes of temporary hair loss. Then, scroll to the temporary hair loss FAQ section to review these concepts in greater detail.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) About Temporary Hair Loss

Below are a few of the most common questions regarding temporary hair loss and shedding. After taking a moment to review each, we invite you to leave additional questions or comments in the Comments section of this post.

What is seasonal hair loss?

If think you’ve experienced “seasonal hair loss,” you are not alone. Women in particular report experiencing symptoms of thinning or shedding hair in late September and October. To better understand this phenomenon, it helps to take a moment to review the hair growth cycle.

Hair grows in 3 distinct phases: Anagen, Catagen, and Telogen. Each phase lasts about 2-6 years, 2-3 weeks, and 2-3 months, respectively. Hair actively grows during the Anagen phase, and the Catagen phase is a separate and distinct growth phase that transitions hair into the Telogen phase. Once in the Telogen phase, hair experiences a period of rest. It is during this resting period, however, that hair can fall out.

According to Swedish researchers, the reason for seasonal hair loss that occurs in the fall might be attributed to the fact that the hair and scalp experience a great deal of stress during summer months. As a consequence, the extra stress might “shock” hairs that are naturally in the Telogen phase, causing them to fall out 2-3 months later. And although the hair loss is perceived in the autumn, it might actually begin to occur in the summer.

Can hair loss occur after pregnancy?

Hair loss is a common occurrence after pregnancy. Many women experience this type of temporary hair loss due to 2 underlying causes: Hormones, and stress. New moms experience a rapid decline in estrogen following childbirth, which might trigger thinning or shedding. New moms are also predisposed to stress-related hair loss after pregnancy, which is referred to as telogen effluvium. One need not go through pregnancy and childbirth to experience telogen effluvium, however (see below).

For more information, visit this article on hair loss and pregnancy.

Can stress cause temporary hair loss?

Stress-related hair loss, or telogen effluvium, can also occur after certain events that “shock” the body. These events might include:

  • Surgery
  • Severe illness
  • Medications
  • Sever emotional stress

For more information, visit this article on female pattern hair loss and telogen effluvium.

Consult a Medical Professional About Hair Loss

If you or a loved one is experiencing symptoms of thinning, shedding, or balding, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami to schedule a comprehensive hair loss evaluation. Our team proudly represents South Florida’s top surgeons, registered nurses, technicians, and technologies. We understand the agony and frustration that accompanies hair loss, and we are committed to helping you develop a customized plan that will create natural results.

Contact us online or call our Institute directly at 1.877.443.9070.

Hereditary Hair Loss, Demystified

Hereditary Hair Loss, DemystifiedAsapSCIENCE is making a big splash on YouTube. With over 500,000 subscribers, the science-based YouTube channel promises to deliver a weekly dose of science and fun through a series of animated videos that attack and demystify some of life’s most thought provoking questions. From describing the science of aging to learning why the chicken really crossed the road, the producers at AsapSCIENCE seem committed to helping Internet users better understand life, one 2 minute video at a time.

Earlier this month, AsapSCIENCE produced an excellent video on the science behind the most common instance of hereditary hair loss. We’re excited to share this video with our readers and encourage everyone to take a look:

An Important Note: As mentioned at the conclusion of the video, the presence (or absence) of a hair loss gene on the X chromosome is just one of the contributors to hair loss. And while it is the most common, it is important to remember that researchers are continually finding new hair loss genes. The hair loss gene APCDD1, for example, was just recently identified by collaborative research conducted at Columbia, Rockefeller, and Stanford Universities.

Hair Loss: A Polygenic Trait

The myth that “hair loss is inherited from the mother’s side” is derived from hair loss research of the early 1900s. Though well intentioned and progressive at the time, researchers were limited in their ability to analyze all possible contributing factors exhibited by their subjects. In the past, researchers have taken a single gene approach to hair loss research, choosing only 1 gene to track, analyze, and compare across different groups of subjects (i). This eventually led to the belief that hair loss was caused by a single gene on the X chromosome (as described in the video above).

While it’s true that certain genes on the X chromosome may cause hereditary hair loss, we now know that there’s a much bigger picture to consider. Modern medical research has identified hair loss is a very complex condition that is actually polygenic, meaning that a number of genes can play a causal role in its development and progression. Moreover, such genes can be inherited from either parent.

Genes and Appearance: What Determines Expression?

To complicate matters further, genetics are not the only thing to impact the way in which hair loss becomes visible, or expressed. A number of other factors may contribute as well, including:

Age. As a man or women continues to age, the likelihood that a hair loss gene may begin to express itself may increase.

Hormones. The relative balance of certain hormones like estrogen, testosterone, and DHT may have a profound impact on the health of hair follicles. DHT, in particular, is known to cause hair miniaturization by impairing healthy follicular function. For women, birth control pills may cause hair loss by similarly disrupting the relative balance of estrogen to testosterone.

Stress. According to the American Hair Loss Association, there is an apparent link between stress and hair loss (ii). Stress seems to affect hair follicle biochemistry, which may cause the hair to enter into a “resting” phase prematurely. This can lead to Telogen Effluvium, specific type of stress-induced hair loss.

Seek a Professional Hair Loss Evaluation, Today

When it comes to reversing the signs of hair loss, early detection is ctritical. Patients trust the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami because we are home to South Florida’s most talented transplant surgeons and clinical team. We are proud to offer the most comprehensive approach for evaluating and treating hair loss—an approach that has produced countless success stories.

Hair Loss Evaluation & Treatment. Readers are invited to learn more by visiting our hair loss evaluation page online. For direct assistance, readers are invited to contact our clinic directly at (305) 925-0222.

Sources:

(i) “Hair Loss Genes.” Bernstein Medical. Accessed 25 March 2013.

(ii) “Effluviums.” American Hair Loss Association. Accessed 25 March 2013.

Visit Us on Facebook for Free Hair Health Infographics

Visit Us on Facebook for Free Hair Health InfographicsAs the Miami Hair Blog gets ready to celebrate its 1-year anniversary, our editors have teamed to provide our readers with 2 exclusive resources on hair transplant surgery and general hair health.

As a special thank-you to everyone who has helped make our Blog the growing success it is today, we’ve transformed our 2 most popular articles into vibrant, easy-to-follow infographics! These infographics are a visual representation of the data and knowledge that our Blog delivers weekly, making them ideal for readers who consider themselves to be visual learners at heart.

Women and Hair Health: A Guide for Women, By Women

Men aren’t the only ones who are losing those luscious locks of hair. At least 20 million American women report signs of thinning and shedding hair, two serious conditions that may ultimately lead to significant mental and emotional distress.

In August, the Miami Hair Blog published a broad overview of the most common causes of hair loss in women. Within a few short weeks, our article became one of the most heavily trafficked pages on our entire website, which only reinforces the importance of this serious issue. The causes of hair loss among females can be attributed to a number of factors, including:

  1. Emotional stress
  2. Poor diet / nutrition
  3. Unhealthy Scalp
  4. Thyroid Disorder
  5. Androgenetic Alopecia
  6. High-androgen Birth Control

Free Infographic: Women and Hair Health

For all of our visual learners out there, we decided to reproduce this article in the form of a free infographic. Readers are invited to Like us on Facebook for complimentary access to Women and Hair Health: A Guide for Women, By Women.

5 Characteristics of a Natural Hairline

Last summer, the Miami Hair Blog produced and exclusive article on the 5 characteristics of a natural hairline. In the article, Dr. Rose shares with readers the most important keys that every surgeon should consider when conducting a transplant procedure. The frontal hairline is perhaps the most noticeable portion of one’s hair, making it critical that the hairline be restored with a detail-oriented approach that focuses on replicating authentic density, thickness, and even all-natural randomness.

Free Infographic: 5 Characteristics of a Natural Hairline

All are welcome to Like us on Facebook for free access to our newest infographic, 5 Characteristics of a Natural Hairline. In this infographic, Fans will learn about the 5 most important aspects of an all-natural hairline through an easy-to-follow visual graphic that has been produced by our team. From everyone at our Institute, we look forward to connecting with you!

To Our Readers: Thank You for All of Your Kind Feedback!

Both Common Causes of Hair Loss in Women and the 5 Characteristics of a Natural Hairline articles have been a great success, generating positive feedback, reader comments, and general inquiries via email and social media. It has been our pleasure to get to know so many readers through this article alone, both from the Miami-area and abroad!

To stay in touch with our Institute, readers are invited to subscribe to the Miami Hair Blog RSS Feed to receive free updates as new content is published each week. Readers may also connect with our Institute on the following social media communities, where it will be our pleasure to discuss hair loss, share transplant success stories, and circulate important health resources:

Like Us on Facebook

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Add Us on Google Plus

PCOS and Hair Loss

PCOS and Hair LossPolycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, is a hormonal condition that physicians attribute to both genetic and environmental factors. It is fairly common, affecting an estimated 10% of women worldwide (i). Primarily, PCOS is known to cause hormonal variations that may make it difficult to get pregnant. However, PCOS may cause additional side effects including weight gain, acne, and hair loss. Over time, studies indicate women with untreated PCOS may be at high risk for developing other serious health conditions like type II diabetes and heart disease.

Diagnosing PCOS

PCOS is perhaps the most common of all endocrine (hormonal) disorders experienced by females of reproductive age, and it is believed to be the leading cause of infertility among women. An estimated 50% of women with PCOS do not know they have the condition. In light of this alarming statistic, it is important to spread awareness for the symptoms of PCOS so proactive measures can be taken to reduce its impact on overall physical and emotional health.

Common symptoms of PCOS include:

  • Acne
  • Uncontrollable fluctuations in weight (gain or loss)
  • Increased growth of facial and/or body hair
  • Irregular menstruation cycles
  • Infertility / difficulty conceiving
  • Emotional distress, including depression
  • Thinning, shedding, or balding of the scalp

PCOS and Hormonally Induced Female Hair Loss

The defining physical characteristic of PCOS is ovarian cysts, tiny growths that appear throughout the ovaries. While the cysts themselves are not harmful, they do impair the production of an essential ovarian enzyme that may significantly reduce estrogen production. Relative androgen levels rise as a consequence, leading to an increased abundance of hormones like testosterone.

Sudden influxes in testosterone may lead to androgenetic alopecia, a specific type of hair loss caused by hormonal changes in the scalp. Increases in testosterone may fuel the production of DHT, a chemical known to adversely affect the hair follicle’s ability to sustain normal hair growth. Most commonly, DHT causes hair miniaturization; a phenomenon in which hair becomes thinner and finer over time. Eventually, miniaturization turns in to all-out hair loss as DHT shuts down the follicle completely.

In a guest blog on the Women’s Hair Loss Project, holistic nutritionist and certified health coach Ms. Amy Medling offers the following tips for overcoming PCOS naturally (ii):

1. Sizzle in the kitchen. According to Ms. Medling, one of the best ways to get back-on-track is to pay close attention to diet. By cooking your own food, you can be sure to use high quality sources that are rich in vitamins, minerals, and nutrients that promote healthy hair.

2. Have discriminating tastes. “Only clean foods allowed in your temple,” Ms. Medling explains. Again, emphasis is placed on seizing control of the quality and nutritional content of each meal.

3. Move it. Not only does physical exercise promote healthy hormonal balance, but it also makes you feel well. Daily exercise and sun exposure can do wonders for reducing stress, which may also decrease the incidence of Telogen Effluvium (stress induced hair loss).

Treatment Options: Restoring Hair Loss Caused by PCOS

Today, a number of procedures are available to women who experience hair loss from PCOS. In addition to improving diet and exercise regimens, women may explore the following options under the guidance of a qualified hair transplant surgeon and clinic:

1. Hair Loss Evaluation. An expert evaluation is essential in diagnosing the root cause of hair loss as well as identifying the most effective course of treatment.

2. Prescription Hair Loss Medications. For women, prescription hair loss treatments like Rogaine® (Minoxidil) may be effective in slowing hormone-induced hair loss.

3. Surgical Hair Restoration. Today, highly refined methods of surgical hair restoration are available to reverse the signs of baldness in a beautiful and all-natural way. Follicular unit extraction procedures are among the most effective, transplanting patients’ real hair to thin or bald areas to produce an authentic end-result with minimal discomfort.

4. ARTAS® System Hair Transplant. Our Institute is proud to be 1 of just 17 clinics in the United States to offer the revolutionary new ARTAS® System by Restoration™ Robotics. A physician-guided robot system, the ARTAS empowers our surgeons to conduct FUE transplants with unparalleled accuracy, consistency, and precision.

Exclusive Interview: Watch as Dr. Rose presents the ARTAS System to CBS Miami.

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we hold our patients’ desire for a full and natural head of hair in the highest regard. Our team works diligently to ensure each patient feels comfortable and confident during each visit, from evaluation to procedure and post-procedure follow-up.

We invite you to learn more about hair loss evaluations at our Institute, or contact our friendly front desk at 305.925.0222.

Sources:

(i) “Amy Medling, the PCOS Diva.” Women’s Hair Loss Project. Accessed 3 March 2013.

(ii) See above.

Birth Control Pills and Hair Loss

Birth Control Pills and Hair LossDoes ‘the pill’ cause hair loss? The topic of birth control and hair loss is as old as the medication itself, dating back to the 1960s when oral contraceptives were first introduced to American women. Unfortunately, women are often surprised to learn that common side effects of birth control may include hair loss. Those who consider taking birth control must also realize that contraceptives may cause a variety of additional side effects, and they do not protect against sexually transmitted diseases.

Learn More. To learn more about birth control and specific side effects, please consult your physician. Always seek the guidance of a licensed medical professional before making any changes to diet, exercise, or prescription medication regimens. The following article is meant to provide a basic overview on oral contraceptives, hormones, and hair loss. It is not a substitute for the expert opinion of a licensed professional.

Which Birth Control Pills Are Most Likely to Cause Hair Loss?

To understand which birth control pills are most likely to cause hair loss, it is first helpful to learn the make-up and basic function of each option. Birth control prevents pregnancy by using different combinations of hormones to suppress ovulation and/or prevent conception. Generally, an oral contraceptive can be characterized by the number of hormones it contains. Combination birth control, for example, contains both estrogen and progestin. The Minipill, by contrast, contains only progestin.

Combination Birth Control vs. Minipill: Which Is Best?

In general, hair loss caused by ‘the pill’ is most often a side effect of hormonal fluctuations. In most cases, birth control causes a relative increase in androgen levels. This may cause a corresponding increase in DHT production, which researchers believe shrinks the hair follicle and causes hair miniaturization. Once this happens, the hair becomes thinner and finer over time. Eventually, it may cease to grow altogether.

Since combination birth control pills contain both progestin and estrogen, they may help to keep androgen levels in check. For this reason, physicians may recommend combination birth control medications to women whose genetics or family history makes them predisposed to hormonally induced hair loss. The minipill, on the other hand, contains no estrogen and may cause a greater relative rise in androgen. With greater fluctuation comes increased sensitivity to hormones (like androgen), which may ultimately contribute to hair loss both during and after birth control use.      

The Androgen Index: Identifying Which Pills Are Least Likely to Cause Hair Loss

The Androgen Index is a way of describing the impact a birth control medication may have on relative androgen levels. By choosing a medication with a low Androgen Index, you may limit your chance of experiencing hair loss (i).

According to the American Hair Loss Association, the following list orders birth control from lowest Androgen Index (1) to highest (20):

  1. Desogen
  2. Ortho-Cept
  3. Ortho-Cyclen
  4. Ortho Tri-Cyclen
  5. Micronor
  6. Nor-Q D
  7. Ovcon-35
  8. Brevicon/Modicon
  9. Ortho Norvum 7/7/7
  10. Ortho Novum 10-11
  11. Tri-Norinyl
  12. Norinyl and Ortho 1/35
  13. Demulen 1/35
  14. Triphasil/Tri-Levien
  15. Nordette
  16. Lo/Ovral
  17. Ovrette
  18. Ovral
  19. Loestrin1/20
  20. Loestrin 1.5/30

High Risk Contraceptives. According to the American Hair Loss Association, the following contraceptives have significant potential for “causing or exacerbating hair loss” (ii):

  1. Progestin Implants, like Norplant.
  2. Hormone Injections, like Depo-Provera.
  3. Skin Patch, like Ortho Evra.
  4. Vaginal Ring, like NuvaRing.

Hair Loss Evaluation, Diagnosis, and Treatment

If you are suffering with hair loss, you are not alone. Nearly 2/3rds of all males experience symptoms of balding, and an estimated 20 million American women experience symptoms of thinning by adulthood.

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we hold our patients’ desire for a full and natural head of hair in the highest regard. We are home of South Florida’s most talented transplant surgeons, microscopists, nurses, and staff. Our team works diligently to ensure each patient feels comfortable and confident during each visit, from evaluation to procedure and post-procedure follow-up.

Early diagnosis is key to full, effective, and natural hair restoration. We invite you to learn more about hair loss evaluations at our Institute, or contact our friendly front desk at 305.925.0222.

Sources:

(i) Birth Control and Hair Loss. American Hair Loss Association. Accessed 25 February 2013.

(ii) Oral Contraceptives. American Hair Loss Association. Accessed 25 February 2013.

Hypothyroidism and Hair Loss

Hypothyroidism and Hair LossThe length, thickness, and color of your hair is often a good indication of the health of the rest of your body. This is particularly true in the case of hormones, as the quality of your hair may be representative of overall hormonal balance.  By the same token, hair loss might be an indication that a hormonal imbalance exists. Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and thyroid are a few of the hormones that may have a profound impact on the appearance of your hair. Of these three hormones, thyroid is a common cause for hair loss among individuals who have either hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. To better understand why, we must first examine how these three major hormones interact with one another during the hair growth cycle.

Understanding Testosterone, Dihydrotestosterone, & Thyroid

Testosterone: Testosterone is widely recognized as the male hormone, however it is present in females as well. The hormone is primarily produced by the reproductive organs of both men and women—in the testes and ovaries, respectfully. Smaller amounts of testosterone are also produced in the adrenal glands of both sexes. In males, the primary role of testosterone is to fuel the development of reproductive tissues. In both sexes, testosterone also plays a critical role in the development of bones, muscle mass, and of course, hair.

Dihydrotestosterone (DHT): DHT is formed when testosterone is synthesized by a very unique enzyme, 5α-reductase. DHT also influences the development of sexual organs and secondary sexual characteristics, like physical appearance. Unlike testosterone, DHT may cause the hair follicle to shrink (and in some causes disappear). This leads to thinning, shedding, or loss of hair.

Thyroid: Thyroid hormone is produced by the thyroid gland, one of the body’s largest endocrine glands. Thyroid hormone serves as a “regulator” of sorts, controlling a number of vital body functions. These include metabolism, involuntary muscle contractions, and the production of cellular energy. When a thyroid condition exists, the body has a difficult time producing the correct amount of thyroid hormone. As a result, the body becomes unable to effectively regulate other body functions, including hair growth.

Hypothyroidism and Hair Loss: 4 Things to Know

Hypothyroidism is a medical condition in which the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. Common causes of hypothyroidism include iodine deficiency, lack of proper gland function, or even stress.

When it comes to hypothyroidism and hair loss, there are 4 important things to know and understand:

1. Overactive Thyroid May Increase Synthesis of DHT

As noted above, DHT is a synthesized version of the hormone testosterone. Unlike testosterone, however, DHT disrupts the natural growth cycle of hair and may eventually cause total loss of the hair follicle. For some individuals, a thyroid disorder may perpetuate hair loss by exacerbating the conversion of testosterone into DHT.

2. Thyroid Medication May Cause Hair Loss

Thyroid disorders come in two main varieties: Hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism. A common treatment for hypothyroidism is levothyroxine sodium, a prescription medication that is available under many brand names including Synthroid, Levoxyl, Levothroid, and Unithroid. Prolonged hair loss is a side effect of this medication for many individuals, specifically for patients taking Synthroid.

3. Additional Thyroid Medications Might Be Necessary to Prevent Hair Loss

If you take thyroid medication and exhibit signs of hair loss, you may need additional prescription medications to effectively treat both conditions. Patients must understand that any prescription drug may cause short term or long term side effects however, and they must always consult a physician prior to starting, switching, or ending a prescription medication regimen.

4. Drug-Free Hair Loss Treatments Are an Effective Option

If you suffer with hair loss that is the result of a thyroid condition, or is the side effect of the thyroid medication you take to treat your condition, you may want to explore other drug-free hair loss treatments. These may include:

  • Hair Transplant Surgery: Hair transplant procedures are now conducted with greater precision and effectiveness than ever before. The Hair Transplant Institute’s very own is co-creator of Follicular Isolation Technique (FIT), a new transplant process by which individual follicular units are extracted from the donor area and transplanted with minimal scarring. More traditional Follicular Unit Transplantation (FUT) procedures are also available.
  • Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT): LLLT treatment for thinning hair uses state-of-the-art lasers to stimulate hair growth at the follicle. Click here to watch Dr. Nusbaum explain this exciting new technology in this introductory video segment to laser hair therapy with the LaserCap™ device.

Schedule an Evaluation with the Hair Transplant Institute

Our friendly staff includes South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, microscopists, technicians, and registered nurses.  We understand the agony and frustration that accompanies hair loss, and we are committed to helping you develop a customized plan that will create natural results.

To learn more about Miami hair transplant procedures at the Hair Transplant Institute, please contact us online or call us directly at 1.877.443.9070.

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