Articles Tagged with: hormonal hair loss

What is Menopausal Hair Loss?

menopausal hair lossHot flashes, mood swings, irregular menstruation – menopause is a stressful time in any woman’s life. One of the lesser-known side effects during the change of life is menopausal hair loss. As the body adjusts to fluctuating hormone levels, women may notice general thinning and shedding across the scalp. Unlike male-pattern baldness, which typically materializes on the hairline and crown, menopausal hair loss is diffuse.

When menopause hits, women produce lower levels of estrogen and progesterone – two hormones responsible for hair growth and follicle health. As these hormones dip, hair growth slows while strands become thin and brittle. After estrogen and progesterone levels fall, androgens (male hormones) increase. Androgens trigger follicle miniaturization on the scalp. Sometimes, androgens cause an increase in facial hair, which is why women suffering from menopausal hair loss may concurrently experience fine fuzz around the chin and upper lip.

Aside from hormonal fluctuations, consider additional factors contributing to menopausal hair loss:

  • Stress
  • Emotional decline due to diminished self-confidence
  • Lack of exercise
  • Imbalanced nutrition
  • Dehydration
  • Damaging hairstyles
  • Medication

Menopausal Hair Loss Treatment

Fortunately, menopausal hair loss is treatable. The Hair Transplant Institute of Miami understands how draining the change of life can be, particularly when hair loss appears as a side effect. We work with female patients to proactively restore their self-esteem through early detection, professional diagnosis and optimal treatment methods.

Our physicians, Dr. Bernard Nusbaum and Dr. Paul Rose, are two recognized leaders in the field of hair restoration. We thoughtfully listen to patients’ concerns and objectives while providing hair loss treatment suggestions that best suit your diagnosis, lifestyle, expectations and goals. At our state-of-the-art facility, we are proud to offer natural-looking hair transplants backed by the latest technologies, professional-grade laser therapy caps for at-home use and stem cell hair growth treatments, among other innovative medical hair therapies. To book your appointment for menopausal hair loss treatment, call our office at 305-925-0222 today.

Are You Suffering with Senescent Alopecia?

Senescent alopecia is a specific type of age-related hair loss that affects both men and women. As we age, hair growth naturally tails off in two important ways. First, the total time spent growing new hair decreases. This means that hair follicles spend an increasing amount of time resting, or producing no new hair at all. Second, the diameter of each individual strand of hair gets smaller over time. This leads to the appearance of “thin” hair, making the scalp increasingly visible over the years.

These two characteristics are distinctly different from androgenic alopecia, or pattern baldness. Across genders, androgenic alopecia is estimated to cause more than 80 million individuals to lose their hair. Whereas senescent alopecia is not always treatable, androgenic alopecia can be treated in a number of different ways. Both surgical and non-surgical treatments are known to produce exceptional results.

Senescent Alopecia, or Androgenic Alopecia?

When first confronting hair loss, it’s important to understand whether it is age-related (senescent) or caused by hormones, genetics, and other factors (androgenic). Understanding the difference can help you find a hair loss professional and treatment regimen that will work with maximum efficacy.

Men and Alopecia

For men, one of the defining characteristics of androgenic alopecia is an increase in DHT, a synthesized version of testosterone. DHT contributes to hair follicle miniaturization, a phenomenon in which follicles shrink over time and lose their ability to support a regular growth cycle. Hair thins, sheds, and eventually stops growing entirely. Below are the most common ways to differentiate between androgenic and senescent alopecia:

Androgenic alopecia:

  • Characterized by heightened levels of DHT
  • High DHT might be caused by genetics and/or hormonal changes
  • Hair loss occurs in patterns, beginning with hairline and progressing back toward the crown of the head
  • Common among men as early as age 20, as late as age 50
  • Also referred to as male pattern baldness
  • Identified and diagnosed with the Norwood Classification

Senescent Alopecia:

  • Characterized by shorter grow time and thinning of hair radius
  • Appears thin, more scalp visible through the hair
  • Does not necessarily progress in a predictable pattern
  • Not necessarily defined by high levels of DHT (though men who suffer with pattern baldness early in life my retain high DHT levels through adulthood)
  • Common among men over the age of 50

Women and Alopecia

For women, the line between androgenic alopecia and senescent alopecia is a less easy to find. This is due to the fact that middle aged women experience hair loss in a much different way than middle aged men. Whereas male androgenic alopecia occurs in a predictable pattern, female androgenic alopecia occurs in diffuse manner that more closely resembles senescent alopecia. Below are the most common ways to differentiate between the two:

Androgenic Alopecia:

  • Can be characterized by high levels of DHT
  • DHT levels affected by genetics and hormonal changes
  • Pregnancy, birth control medications, and PCOS are 3 common causes for increased DHT production and hair loss
  • Common in women following the onset of puberty through age 40
  • Identified and diagnosed with the Ludwig Classification

Senescent Alopecia:

  • Not caused by DHT
  • Most common among women over age 60
  • Characterized by shorter grow time and thinning of hair radius
  • Appears thin, more scalp visible through the hair

Treating Alopecia at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we offer the most advanced and comprehensive hair loss evaluations to determine the root cause of hair loss in both men and women. To learn more, contact us online or call or clinic at 305-925-0222.