Articles Tagged with: heart disease

August is Hair Loss Awareness Month 2013

August is Hair Loss Awareness Month 2013It’s estimated that hair loss affects 2/3rds of all men and millions more women. According to the International Society for Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS), approximately 25% of Americans feel insecure and self-conscious when losing hair, and 95% feel “bothered.”  And when it comes to restoring those luscious locks, 73% of hair loss sufferers say they would trade a valuable personal possession for more hair.

Hair loss can have a profoundly negative effect on social, personal, and professional life. Men and women do not have to suffer with a compromised self-image, however.

This August, the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami joins the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) in raising awareness for hair loss. An annual campaign, Hair Loss Awareness Month aims to help men and women better understand the causes for this widespread condition, as well as effective treatments for restoring the scalp to its natural, beautiful, and youthful appearance.

Get Involved This August

There are many ways to get involved with Hair Loss Awareness Month. The Miami Hair Blog is a good place to start, as our archives feature valuable resources on hair loss, transplant techniques, hair restoration technologies, and much more. Below are just a few ways you can use our Institute’s resources to learn more about this serious condition, share important materials, and ultimately help hair loss sufferers overcome the negative side of losing hair.

Learn what causes pattern baldness.

There are several factors known to contribute to loss of hair among men and women. Some individuals seem to be hard-wired for hair loss, a specific type of pattern baldness known as androgenetic alopecia. Others experience hair loss in the aftermath of a serious and stressful life event, a phenomenon known as Telogen Effluvium. Still others experience thinning or shedding due to traction alopecia, a type of hair loss that occurs when hair is styled, flattened, or held in a restricted position for a prolonged period of time.

Understanding the cause of hair loss is essential in determining an effective course of treatment. Learn more by reading our About Hair Loss section.

Understand the Signs and Progression of Baldness

Male hair loss progresses in a somewhat typical pattern depicted by the Norwood Classification. Physicians use the Norwood Classification to determine the extent to which a man has begun to lose his hair. It is also used to predict how hair loss will progress, providing the insight needed for surgeons to effectively plan and perform a transplant that is natural in appearance. Learn more about the Norwood Classification for male pattern baldness.

Female hair loss also occurs in a somewhat predictable pattern, however it differs drastically from male pattern baldness. Physicians use a different method of classification for women, known as the Ludwig Classification. Visit this article on diagnosing female hair with the Ludwig Classification loss to learn more.

Know when hair loss is a sign of a larger health issue.

One of the most important reasons to spread awareness for hair loss is because it could be a sign of a serious health condition. There are a number of studies that correlate hair loss with serious illness, making it critical that patients consult a physician when noticing signs of thinning, shedding, or balding.

Prescription Medications. In some cases, hair loss is the side effect of a prescription drug. If you experience hair loss, speak to your physician about alternatives to your current medication. Please Note: Always consult a physician prior to making changes to your prescription medication regimen.

Heart Disease. Recently, the University of Tokyo released findings that indicate bald men are at a higher risk of developing coronary heart disease. The research was the culmination of studying some 37,000 men and indicated that chances of heart condition also increase with the severity of hair loss. Visit this article to read more on how bald men are at high risk for heart disease.

Share this article.

Finally, share this article to become actively involved in spreading awareness for health, hair loss, and effective treatment. Together, we can raise awareness for the serious health risks associated with this condition, as well as methods of diagnosis and effective treatment.

Take action.

If you or a loved one has noticed thinning, shedding, or balding hair, contact our Institute to schedule a hair loss evaluation. Our team proudly represents South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, and we stand committed to providing only the most advanced methodology and technologies to help men and women realize their dreams of a fuller, natural head of hair.

Readers are also invited to call toll free 877-443-9070.

Losing Hair? You Could Have Hypertension

Losing Hair? You Could Have HypertensionHair transplant surgeons often encourage patients to monitor their hair for signs of thinning, shedding, and loss. Keeping tabs on hair health is about more than preserving appearance, however. An ever-growing body of research indicates that hair health is intricately tied to overall mental, physical, and emotional wellness. From stress-related shedding to loss caused by overzealous styling, there are a number of well-documented ways in which lifestyle can negatively (or positively) affect hair health.

Most recently, researchers have identified a new connection between hair and heart health. A Japanese team of scientists has found a convincing correlation between hair loss and hypertension, a condition more commonly referred to as high blood pressure. The findings are the result of a study of nearly 38,000 men and women in which participants who suffered with hair loss, specifically pattern baldness, were about 32% more likely to also exhibit signs of hypertension (i).

Hair Loss & Health: Why Consulting a Physician is a Big Deal

Researchers say their findings are important for at least two reasons. First, the study provides a serious word of caution to young men and women who first begin to lose their hair. With such a strong correlation between hair loss and hypertension, individuals who experience hair loss are wise to consult a physician about their physical health. Hypertension causes blood pressure to rise, which also causes the heart to work harder to circulate blood. Over time, this can make a patient more prone to heart attack and stroke. Hypertension is also associated with arterial diseases, kidney disease, and shorter life expectancy. In addition to consulting a physician about these conditions, individuals who experience hair loss may also wish to have blood analysis conducted to assess hormonal health.

Second, researchers say this study, along with others, helps to spread awareness for the way in which hair can be an external barometer for internal health. Lead researcher Dr. Erling Thom explains (ii):

“Through our research with Nourkrin and female hair loss, we have discovered that there are many health issues for men and women that can actually be identified at an early stage through looking for hair loss and thinning hair […]”

In this way, monitoring one’s hair for signs of thinning or shedding can ultimately provide an early alert that a larger health issue exists. In turn, patients who understand the risks associated with hair loss are more likely to consult a physician when it occurs, prompting early diagnosis and treatment. Dr. Erling elaborates:

“Losing hair is one of these very early signs [that your body is under stress from a disease], which up till now has not been treated with the respect it deserves, as a precursor to a more serious condition.”

This health report has been produced by the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. For additional information on our Institute, including hair loss evaluation and consultation services, readers are invited to contact our office directly at 1-877-443-9070.

Sources:

(i) “Hair Loss Could Be a Sign of Hypertension.” Maidenhead Online. Accessed 1 June 2013.

(ii) See above.

A Decade in Review: Exciting Achievements in Hair Loss Research

A Decade in Review- Exciting Achievements in Hair Loss ResearchThe past decade has seen a number of exciting discoveries that have led to a fuller and richer understanding of hair loss. And while the availability of a hair loss cure is still many years away, physicians and patients alike are excited with these recent achievements in the study of hair growth, loss, and replacement.

Certainly, there are far too many hypotheses, studies, and research initiatives to list in a single health report. Even greater are the number of studies that are currently underway, the outcomes of which will remain largely unknown until each study is concluded, analyzed, re-tested, and published.  Nevertheless, we would like to take a moment to highlight a few of the decade’s most exciting achievements in hair loss research.

We invite our readers to browse the studies below and follow the Read More link for the original full-coverage reports, previously published on the Miami Hair Blog.

Vitamin D and Hair Growth

The first researcher to theorize about vitamin D’s role in promoting normal hair growth was Mark Haussler, a University of Arizona College of Medicine professor. In 1969, Mr. Haussler explained that the vitamin D receptor in hair follicles is “crucial for the generation of hair,” (i).

Nearly 3 decades later, American culture was swept by a catchy advertising campaign that spread awareness for vitamin D, calcium, and osteoporosis prevention. With the help of A-list celebrity endorsements and clever advertising language, the Got Milk? campaign successfully penetrated the minds of America’s youth, reminding them that milk is a fundamental part of healthy bone development.

Unfortunately, the link between hair health and vitamin D was never part of the advertising campaign and received little notice from mainstream media. Until now.

Read More: Researchers Find Vitamin D May Stimulate Hair Growth.

Hair Loss and Heart Disease

The idea that body health is holistic in nature is nothing new. Anyone who has experienced a common cold shortly after a time of great stress is well attuned to the concept that mental, emotion, and physical health are interrelated. The aforementioned example illustrates how emotional health can affect physical health, as stress (an emotional state) may lead to the breakdown and impairment of the immune system (a physical system), resulting in a cold.

In this way, health professionals believe that a specific illness may manifest itself in a number of different ways. Most recently, researchers have found that hair loss could be an outward-sign of serious cardiovascular issues.

Read More: Is Hair Loss a Sign of Heart Disease?

Treatment for Individuals with Alopecia Areata is ‘Favorable’

In Japan, researchers at the Tokyo Medical University have released new research indicating that individuals with alopecia areata have a ‘favorable’ prognosis across a variety of different treatment options. Researchers evaluated 1,030 patients for a 3-year period, taking note of the severity, improvement, and cure rate of the hair loss. At the end of the study, the research team found that patients who exhibited regeneration of vellus hairs also showed a significantly higher improvement in the reversal of general alopecia areata symptoms.

According to lead-researcher Dr. Masaki Uchiyama, M.D., the study provides strong evidence that the course of treatment for the patients did not have a “statistically significant influence” on the regeneration of their body hair (ii).

Read More: Treatment for Individuals with Alopecia Areata is Promising.

Connect with the Hair Transplant Institute

Follow Miami_Hair on Twitter or Like Our Facebook Page to keep up-to-date with the latest hair loss news, research, and health guides!

Sources for this hair loss research report include:

(i) Wang, Shirley S. “The Search for a Baldness Cure.” 12 September 2012.

(ii) “Rapidly Progressive Alopecia Shows Favorable Prognosis.” Published on Medicalxpress.com. Accessed November 26th, 2012.

Hairlines and Heart Health: Is Hair Loss a Sign of Heart Disease?

Hairlines and Heart Health- Is Hair Loss a Sign of Heart Disease?Physicians now warn patients to be increasingly wary of the signs of aging. The notion that people “look old because they’re getting old” is misguided, and a new study conducted by the University of Copenhagen in Denmark has found several ties between visible signs of aging and heart disease.

The new findings were presented to more than 17,000 health professionals at Scientific Sessions 2012, the American Heart Association’s largest gathering of scientists and healthcare professionals devoted to the study of cardiovascular health. Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen, senior study author for the University’s research initiative, warns that the study “shows that aging signs may mark poor cardiovascular health and therefore validates the prognostic importance of a very simple clinical exam,” (i).

According to the study, the following signs were most strongly correlated with increased risk of heart attack and heart disease:

  • Earlobe creases
  • Yellow fat deposits around the eyelids
  • Hairline recession near the temples
  • Thinning or balding hair at the crown of the head

The study also indicated that individuals with at least 3 out of the 4 signs above were at the greatest risk. Of those studied, participants who exhibited at least 3 of the above signs of aging had a 57 percent greater risk of suffering from a heart attack. Moreover, risk of heart disease was 39 percent greater for individuals with at least 3 of the above characteristics.

More Details on This Study

  • Total Number of Participants: 10,885
  • Participants’ Age & Gender: Both men and women, ages 40 and over
  • 7,537 participants had a receding hairline at the onset of the study.
  • 3,938 participants exhibited thin / bald areas at the crown of the head at the onset of the study.
  • 3,405 showed crease in the earlobes.
  • 678 had xanthelasmata, or fatty deposits surrounding the eyelids, often yellow in color.

Not surprisingly, over 30% of the individuals who participated in the study exhibited earlobe creases, a trait that has long been correlated with increased risk of heart attack and cardiovascular disease (ii). It is important to note, however, that creases in the earlobes have never been labeled a cause for heart issues. Creases are more common among older men and women who may suffer with heart disease, along with many other illnesses, for a variety of different reasons.

What did surprise researchers, however, was the vast population of participants who exhibited signs of hair loss. With 7,537 showing signs of hairline recession and 3,938 showing thinning or balding at the crown of the head, the prevalence of hair loss among those with a greater risk of developing a heart condition is striking. Like the correlation between earlobe creases and heart disease, however, there is no substantial evidence to show that hair loss causes heart disease. Demonstrating causation between hair loss and heart health, according to Ms. Tybjaerg-Hansen, will require additional follow-up studies.

Hair Transplant Institute of Miami: Home to South Florida’s Top Hair Surgeons

This health report has been produced by the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. For additional information on our Institute, including hair loss evaluation and consultation services, please contact our office directly at 1-877-443-9070.

Sources for this article include:

(i) Ostrow, Nicole. Receding Hairline Among the Signs of Heart Disease Risk. Accessed November 10, 2012.

(ii) Medline Plus. Earlobe Creases. Accessed November 10th, 2012.

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