Articles Tagged with: health and hair loss

Top 5 Reasons Why Your Health Might Be Causing Your Hair Loss

Lab results and medical charts are not the only ways to find out about your health and well-being. Your body has several ways of telling you that something may be amiss. This includes the condition of your scalp and hair.

Sometimes, sudden or unexpected changes to your hair – from differences in strength, texture, or color to significant hair loss and shedding – can be early warning signs about other health issues that require your attention.

Here are the top five reasons why your overall health might be contributing to or causing your hair loss issues:

Alopecia Areata

This hair loss condition is caused by a direct attack on hair follicles by your own immune system and white blood cells. This assault causes the follicles to shrink and subsequently slow down hair production. In turn, this leads to hair loss in quarter-sized patches which can progress across the scalp rapidly and unpredictably. The hair follicles are not destroyed and can regrow as soon as the inflammation subsides.

Unlike hereditary hair loss, which generally begins later in life, visible signs of alopecia areata typically occur before the age of 30.

Anemia

Anemia, or an insufficient amount of iron in the blood, is one of the most common causes of dietary-related hair loss. Low levels of iron restrict proper blood flow – reducing the amount of growth-stimulating nutrients that hair follicles need. Foods such as spinach, broccoli, kale, and other leafy greens can increase your iron intake and help feed your hair.

Lupus

At least 1.5 million Americans live with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, commonly called lupus, according to the Lupus Foundation of America. This chronic and painful condition disproportionately affects women – lupus is nine times more common in women than in men.  

Lupus causes the body’s immune system to produce antibodies that attack healthy cells and tissue throughout the body, including hair follicles. Seeing these follicles as harmful enemies, the antibodies kick them out, resulting in hair loss. Lupus symptoms tend to be cyclical, flaring up and then going into remission which means that hair may grow back only to fall out again. If scarring occurs in affected hair follicles, the hair loss can be permanent.

Hashimoto’s Disease

The thyroid gland creates and releases hormones throughout the body. When it isn’t working correctly, either by releasing too many hormones (hyperthyroidism) or too few (hypothyroidism), it can negatively impact the body’s natural functioning and cause a range of symptoms and conditions, including hair loss.

Hashimoto’s Disease, also called chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, is the most common cause of hypothyroidism. It involves the immune system directly attacking the thyroid, limiting its ability to produce the hormones necessary for healthy hair growth. Without those hormones, hair will stop growing and eventually fall out.

Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes can cause hair loss when elevated blood sugar levels interact with and change the shape of red blood cells. Misshapen red blood cells have a more difficult time traveling through smaller blood vessels, including the capillaries that supply vital blood to hair follicles. When that blood flow is disrupted, follicles may die and hair may fall out.

Call the Miami Hair & Skin Institute Today to Discuss Your Condition

For those living with a challenging medical condition or health problems, hair loss can make an already difficult situation even more so. At the Miami Hair & Skin Institute, we help patients who are experiencing health-related hair loss develop a treatment program to complement the treatment they receive for the underlying condition behind that hair loss

To schedule your personalized hair loss evaluation and to learn more about our effective treatments, please contact our clinic at 305-925-0222.

illnesses and hair loss

3 Underlying Illnesses That Cause Hair Loss

illnesses and hair lossHair loss can be a problem in and of itself, caused by a condition or factors which have no other significant health effects. For example, this is the case with androgenetic alopecia, a hereditary hair loss condition that affects over three million Americans annually and is responsible for over 95 percent of hair loss cases in men and women. Sometimes, however, hair loss is an unfortunate result of other serious underlying medical conditions. When hair loss is caused by other illnesses, it can still be effectively addressed in conjunction with treatment for the condition which is responsible for the loss.

Some of the more well-known and common illnesses which can cause hair loss include:

Lupus

A chronic and often painful autoimmune disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, commonly called lupus, afflicts at least 1.5 million Americans according to the Lupus Foundation of America. Lupus disproportionately affects women – it is nine times more common in women than in men – and hair loss is one of many unfortunate symptoms of this condition, along with severe fatigue, joint pain, joint swelling, headaches, and a rash on the cheeks and nose (known as “butterfly rash”).

Lupus causes the body’s immune system to create antibodies which attack healthy cells and tissue. This includes hair follicles. The antibodies cause the hair shaft to be rejected by the body, resulting in hair loss. Lupus symptoms tend to cyclical, coming and going between flare-ups and remission, which means hair may grow back naturally in some cases, only to again fall out. If, however, scarring occurs in affected hair follicles, the loss can be permanent.

Thyroid Disease

Found in our necks, the thyroid gland creates and releases hormones throughout the body. When the thyroid is not functioning properly, either by releasing too many hormones (hyperthyroidism) or too few (hypothyroidism), it can throw off the body’s natural functioning and cause many unwanted conditions. Since hormones are the fuel behind hair growth, a disruption in hormone production caused by a compromised thyroid will have a direct impact on hair growth, retention, and loss.

Diabetes

The high blood sugar levels which are at the heart of diabetes can wreak havoc on the body and cause a wide range of physical disruptions. Diabetes can cause hair loss when those elevated blood sugar levels interact with and change the shape of red blood cells. Misshapen red blood cells have a more difficult time traveling through smaller blood vessels, including the capillaries that supply vital blood to hair follicles. When that blood flow is disrupted, follicles may die and hair may fall out.

Not only can serious illness lead to hair loss, but many treatments for disease, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy for cancer patients, can also cause hair to fall out. Hair loss in those dealing with a challenging medical condition can make an already difficult situation even more so. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we can help develop a hair loss treatment program that works in conjunction with treatments for the underlying condition causing that loss.

Schedule a hair loss evaluation to learn more about effective treatment with the world-renowned experts at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. To learn more about treatment, contact our clinic at 305-925-0222.

5 Benefits of an FUE Hair Transplant

Is Hair Health Important?

hair healthFor many men and women, hair health is not a priority. Their haircare routine is typically straightforward: shampoo, maybe conditioner and perhaps a little styling spray to look put together. Others take their hair health more seriously, particularly individuals who suffer from embarrassing hair loss conditions. But, does hair health truly matter?

The answer is multifaceted. Hair is a complex structure and has its own anatomy just like any other part of your body. At the base of hair – underneath the skin – there are living cells that work arduously to sustain growth, strength and shine. Therefore, the hair you see is often a reflection of your vitality and overall well-being. Improving the health of your hair isn’t just about looking great, it’s also about strengthening and supporting each strand from root to tip.

Hair Anatomy

Each strand, or shaft, is anchored by a follicle. The follicle is a tubular pouch just underneath the skin’s surface. Two sheaths surround the follicle to protect the shaft. The outer sheath runs alongside the sebaceous gland, which produces oils that naturally condition hair and give it its natural sheen. The outer sheath connects to the arrector pili muscle, and when contracted, causes hair to stand up – an effect more commonly known as goosebumps.

At the base of the follicle is known as the bulb, where cells build and nourish the shaft. These cells are connected to tiny blood vessels, or capillaries, which deliver hormones and nourishment to sustain healthy hair growth. When your body’s hormones are off balance or shifting as you age, the cells can’t re-build new shafts to replace everyday shedding. This is a condition known as androgenetic alopecia, also called male-pattern baldness of female pattern hair loss (FPHL).

Meanwhile, the shaft is made of a hard protein called keratin. The hair you see on your head, arms or legs is dead and no longer nourished by the follicle and its cells. Although it’s not living, the shaft is convoluted. Sometimes, an inner layer called the medulla is present, but this portion only exists in certain types of hair. The middle layer (which everyone has) is called the cortex, containing pigment to help give your hair its natural shade. The outer layer is called the cuticle. Most everyday hair care products designed to smooth or soften hair target the cuticle. Cuticle structure varies based on your hair type which can affect hair’s appearance. For instance, people with curly hair have drier, dull strands because sebum has a difficult time traveling down the kinks of the cuticle to condition shafts properly.

Why Hair Health Matters

Your hair has both cultural and social significance, which is why so many men and women who suffer from hereditary hair loss experience shame and discomfort with their appearances. Despite how much information we know about hair and its biological variations, human beings innately favor physical attributes in one another (and themselves) that suggest better health. One of these physical attributes is strong and voluminous hair.

It’s important to note that not everyone lacks beautiful, big hair because they aren’t healthy. While hair loss is sometimes indicative of an underlying health concern, most hair loss cases are due to predetermined genetics and hormonal fluctuations. Even pregnancy, one of the most natural (albeit magnificent) processes a woman’s body can undergo, modifies hair’s growth and form. Despite what human beings perceive, thinning and shedding doesn’t always indicate something is fundamentally wrong with your body. But, the emotional toll of hair loss certainly makes it feel that way.

If you suffer from androgenetic alopecia or another hair loss condition, improving your appearance by counteracting your hair loss can be a life changing experience. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we help hair loss patients boost their self-assurance by restoring hair to reflect the way they truly feel on the inside – strong, fit and vibrant. Call us at 305-925-0222 to schedule your hair loss consultation in Miami today.

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