Articles Tagged with: hair follicle

New Study Identifies JAK Enzyme Inhibitor as Possible Hair Loss Cure

New Study Identifies JAK Enzyme Inhibitor as Possible Hair Loss Cure In a new study published by researchers at Columbia University, scientists believe they may have found an enzyme that controls hair growth. These enzymes are part of the Janus kinase, or JAK, family. In studies conducted with laboratory mice, researchers found that rapid hair growth could be achieved simply by inhibiting the JAK family of enzymes.

“What we’ve found is promising, though we haven’t yet shown it’s a cure for pattern baldness,” said Dr. Christiano in a news story published by Columbia University. “More work needs to be done to test if JAK inhibitors can induce hair growth in humans using formulations specially made for the scalp.”

Although it is uncertain whether or not “JAK inhibitor” hair restoration procedures will ever be available to hair loss sufferers, other treatments are available to patients in the form of topical foams, prescription medications, and laser therapy. Each of these non-surgical treatments focuses on preventing hair follicles from slipping into a “resting” phase, which is similar to the way JAK enzyme inhibition was found to promote new hair growth. By preventing hair follicles from becoming dormant—and hopefully reawakening those that are already asleep—these treatments aim to stop the progression of hair loss by improving hair follicle health so a natural growth cycle can be maintained.

Hair Follicle Health: Before & After Surgery

Hair loss is a progressive life long disease, so it’s important to understand how your condition may change over time. Every patient experiences a unique (though somewhat predictable) pattern of hair loss, which will ultimately affect the nuances of how and when a hair transplant will be performed. For many patients, supplementary treatments may prove helpful in preventing the progression of hair loss in the days and weeks before hair transplant surgery.

“We recommend a complement to hair transplant surgery,” explains Dr. Bernard Nusbaum. “And finasteride, minoxidil as well as laser therapy with Capillus products are an excellent option. These treatments can be used singly, or in combination.”

The Hair Transplant Institute also offers laser therapy with the Capillus272™ OfficePro. This unit is located on-site, and is recommended for use during the first days after hair transplant surgery. “Within two weeks after surgery, laser therapy with the Capillus272 Office Pro is utilized to enhance healing and speed post-procedure recovery.”

Reducing Scalp Trauma to Maintain Follicle Health

Most patients are familiar with the goal of a hair transplant procedure: To extract donor hair from a healthy area of scalp so it can be transplanted to the area(s) suffering from excessive hair loss, thinning, or balding (commonly referred to as the “restoration area”). However, many are unfamiliar with a second goal that is of equal importance. While performing a hair transplant, surgeons must minimize scalp trauma to ensure each transplanted hair follicle survives and thrives in the restoration area.

A new study co-authored by the Hair Transplant Institute’s lead surgeon, Dr. Paul Rose, reveals a new approach to follicular unit extraction (FUE) that may reduce scalp trauma by more than 21%. The new technique promises several key benefits, including:

  • Accelerated healing process
  • Reduced appearance of post operative scars
  • Minimizing of any potential blood loss

Readers are invited to learn more about reducing scalp trauma during hair transplant surgery.

Comprehensive Hair Loss Evaluation and Treatment at Miami Hair

At Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we are always searching for ways to safely improve our patients’ experience with new technologies, advanced procedures, and exceptional results. We invite readers to contact us online or call our clinic directly at 877-443-9070 to learn more about comprehensive hair loss evaluation and treatment with South Florida’s top surgeons.

Does TRT Cause Hair Loss?

Does TRT Cause Hair Loss?Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT) is a new option for aging men who suffer with low testosterone. With just a few treatments, many men report big gains across some of the most significant dimensions of lifestyle and fitness. More energy, increased libido, and better mood are just a few of the positive effects reported by men who undergo TRT under the supervision of a licensed medical professional. TRT is not without potential risks, however.

Not all men are healthy candidates for TRT. Of those who are candidates, some TRT patients may experience side effects. Hair loss is one example of such side effects, causing great distress among the men who are often shocked that “extra testosterone” may cause hair to fall.

TRT Causing Hair Loss?

So, will TRT cause hair loss? The answer may vary from person to person. The biggest variables to consider are testosterone, DHT, and personal predisposition to hair loss.

Testosterone

Low testosterone, or Low T, is one of the biggest reasons patients elect to go on TRT. To assess the impact TRT may have on your hair, it’s important to know what your testosterone levels are at the start. As TRT is more heavily relied upon, the risk for hair loss may increase in some individuals.

DHT

Dihydrotestosterone, or DHT, is a unique and synthesized version of your body’s natural testosterone. It’s important to note that the conversion of testosterone to DHT happens naturally and at a unique level for every individual. Many studies cite DHT as a primary driver behind hair follicle miniaturization, which often leads to shedding and male pattern baldness.

Hair Loss

One of the biggest factors determining risk of hair loss is genetics. Looking at family history, do thin hairlines and balding crowns characterize any of your relatives? Cast aside the myth that male pattern baldness is determined by the mother’s side only. In fact, baldness throughout both the maternal and paternal lineage can increase the likelihood of experiencing hair loss in the future.

Putting it All Together: Does TRT Cause Hair Loss?

While the exact reason for hair loss may vary across each TRT patient, there seems to be a correlation between increased testosterone and the synthesis of DHT. The following hypothetical may help to illustrate how TRT may cause hair loss among some men:

  1. TRT increases available testosterone;
  2. Higher levels of testosterone may lead to a higher rate of DHT synthesis;
  3. As testosterone levels and DHT synthesis increase, DHT may begin to shut-down hair follicle activity.

Reverse TRT Hair Loss

Schedule a hair loss evaluation with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami if your hair appears to be getting thinner or finer while undergoing TRT. Our team is comprised of South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, nurses, microscopists, and technicians. We understand the challenges that hair loss presents to personal, social, and professional life, and we are here to help make a difference.

Learn more about hair loss evaluations online, or call our Institute directly at 1-877-443-9070.

New Clues to Baldness Uncovered, and Stem Cells May Help

New Clues to Baldness Uncovered, and Stem Cells May HelpWe’re just two months in to 2016, and already there have been a handful of new discoveries uncovering new clues to what causes androgenetic alopecia, or hair loss. Together, these studies have furthered researchers’ understanding of hair loss and viable treatment options. As a growing body of research continues to identify specific proteins and cells responsible for hair follicle shutdown, it becomes increasingly clear why stem cell therapy can help.

Damaged DNA has been identified as a major causal factor for hair loss. A long held belief, this theory was put to the test by researchers in Japan, the Netherlands, and the United States (source: MedicalXpress.com).

A specific follicle protein has been identified as another factor by researchers at the University of Colorado. According to studies, the protein seems to be “responsible for causing follicle stem cells to go dormant,” (source: NewsMax.com).

In both cases, researchers see the opportunity to use stem cell therapy to reverse or inhibit the changes that ultimately lead to pattern baldness.

Are You Losing Hair?

If you notice excessive hair loss, rest assured you are not alone. Millions suffer with this condition worldwide—but it is treatable. Contact us online to schedule a free hair loss consultation, or call our clinic directly at 305-925-0222.

Scalp Folliculitis and Hair Loss

Scalp Folliculitis and Hair LossScalp folliculitis, or hair folliculitis, is common among both men and women. This condition is characterized by moderate to severe irritation of the hair follicle(s), which may disrupt normal hair growth when left untreated.

Know the symptoms. If the irritated area of skin exhibits red pimples that appear to have a hair growing from the center, you may have hair folliculitis. This condition is easily recognized on the arms, back, legs, and beard/neck area. It is not so easily recognized when it occurs on the scalp, making it important to consult a hair loss professional should you notice pimples, itchiness, burning sensations, or discharge along the hairline, crown of the head, or rear/sides of the scalp.

Use the information below to learn more about hair folliculitis, scalp irritation, and hair loss. If you believe hair folliculitis might be causing you hair to thin, recede, or bald, schedule a hair loss evaluation to learn more about effective treatment with world renowned experts at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami.

What causes hair folliculitis?

Hair folliculitis is most commonly caused by the following:

  • Yeast
  • Fungus
  • Bacteria
  • Contact/rubbing from tight clothing
  • Damaged hair follicles (e.g. shaving irritation)
  • Blockage caused by irritants like sweat, oils, and cosmetic makeup

Can folliculitis lead to hair loss?

At first, the follicle may maintain its hair fiber while folliculitis begins to take effect. In time, irritation may make it impossible for the hair follicle to support a normal hair growth cycle. When pronounced, folliculitis can cause irritation so severe that it damages the hair follicle entirely, rendering it incapable of producing any hair at all.

Treat and Reverse Hair Folliculitis

There are a few effective ways to treat and reverse hair folliculitis.

  1. Get a hair loss diagnosis. Because hair folliculitis can be difficult to identify, it’s important to consult a hair loss professional should you notice any of the symptoms described above.
  1. Treat the folliculitis. Sometimes, folliculitis is caused by a bacterial infection that can be treated with an over-the-counter antibiotic ointment. In other cases, non-infectious hair folliculitis can be treated by thoroughly cleaning excess sebum from the scalp. When treating folliculitis, it’s important to follow the recommendation given by your hair loss professional.
  1. Regain what’s lost. Finally, consider additional hair loss treatments to prevent additional hair loss while also thickening your hair. Topical foam, prescription medication, and low-level laser therapy are among the most common forms of treatment. More information on each of these hair loss treatments is provided below.

Topical Hair Loss Foam

Everyone has seen a commercial for Rogaine®. As one of the most popular topical hair loss foams, Rogaine is widely recognized by men, women, and hair loss professionals as a viable option for slowing and stopping the progression of hair loss. Visit the following page to learn more about hair loss treatments like Rogaine.

Prescription Hair Loss Medication

One of the most common prescription medications for hair loss is finasteride, better known as Propecia®. This drug is available only for men, and women must be careful not to handle these tablets, especially while pregnant or nursing. If you are a man suffering with hair loss, visit the following page to learn more about prescription medicines like Propecia.

Laser Hair Restoration

Laser Hair Restoration (LHT) is enjoying a lot of recent popularity among men, women, and physicians. This is a minimally invasive, nonsurgical hair restoration option that involves laser treatment up to 3-4 times weekly. Patients may visit our office to receive laser therapy, or they may purchase a personal-use hair restoration laser like the Capillus272™ Pro for use at home.

Folliculitis Diagnosis and Treatment in Miami

If you believe hair folliculitis might be causing you hair to thin, recede, or bald, schedule a hair loss evaluation to learn more about effective treatment with world renowned experts at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our surgeons, nurses, and staff represent the finest team in Miami. To learn more about treatment, contact our clinic at 305-925-0222.

Discovery of New Stem Cells May Hold Future Hair Loss Cure

Researchers have long pursued the discovery of stem cell that could quickly and easily reverse the signs of hair loss. Such a cell would function as a proverbial “on/off switch,” giving hair loss physicians the ability to induce new hair growth across areas of bald skin. Men and women who suffer with androgenetic alopecia (pattern baldness) would not be the only benefactors; individuals who suffer hair loss following severe injuries, burns, or illnesses could also benefit from a quick and easy hair loss treatment protocol directed through a specific stem cell.

This December, a discovery at the University of Calgary indicates that researchers might be closer to this dream. Dr. Jeff Biernaskie, a Veterinary Medicine professor, published research findings in the December 2014 issue of the Developmental Cell journal that identify certain self-renewing cells located in the dermal sheath that play an integral role in managing hair growth. One day, hair loss professionals may be able to target these cells with specially formulated drugs to induce new hair growth in a precise and controlled fashion. Says Dr. Biernaskie, “We hope that we can ultimately stimulate these cells with drugs to replenish or rejuvenate the cells that are responsible for inducing hair growth,” (i). To understand how these self-renewing cells might someday cure hair loss, it’s helpful to first understand the role dermal papilla plays in overseeing normal hair growth.

The dermal papilla is a cluster of cells located at the base of the hair follicle. Dermatologists have long understood that this cluster of cells stimulates new hair growth via epidermal cells and the hair follicle. Exactly how the dermal papilla oversees this process, however, has largely remained a mystery until recently. Moreover, research indicates that dysfunctional dermal papilla are common among individuals with pattern baldness.

“When you lose your hair, particularly in male pattern baldness, we know the reason you go bald is because of dysfunction of[…] dermal papilla,” explains Dr. Biernaskie.

But what if certain neighboring cells could be used to resuscitate dormant dermal papilla? This question became the inspiration for the central hypothesis tested by Dr. Biernaskie and his research team. To identify these potential cells, the team used genetic markers to label individual cells within the dermal sheath. While monitoring the cells, the team made an exciting discovery: A small number of cells within the dermal sheath exhibited the ability to self-renew, creating new cells in each hair follicle. Those new cells included new dermal papilla, which ultimately have the power to facilitate new hair growth.

Commenting on the discovery, Dr. Biernaskie says, “We know that there is a small group of dermal stem cells in each follicle, we know where they reside[…] down the road, we might be able to look at different drugs that activate these cells[…] in order to stimulate new hair growth.”

Sources

(i) http://www.ucalgary.ca/utoday/issue/2014-12-10/stem-cell-discovery-sheds-new-light-hair-growth

Female Pattern Hair Loss vs. Telogen Effluvium

Female Pattern Hair Loss vs. Telogen EffluviumAn estimated 1 in 4 females will suffer with hair loss by the age of 35. For many, the cause is linked to sudden hormonal changes that follow puberty or precede menopause. For others, hair loss may occur as a result of high stress situations like divorce, pregnancy, or chronic illness. No matter what the cause, most women have trouble admitting that they are experiencing hair loss (i).

Two leading causes of female hair loss include Female Pattern Hair Loss (known by the medical name androgenetic alopecia) and Telogen Effluvium. Androgenetic alopecia causes hair loss at the top and sides of the head and may be seen at a variety of ages. Telogen Effluvium typically occurs during the latter years of life and, as the name suggests, happens when hair follicles enter into the telogen (resting) phase prematurely. This disrupts the natural hair growth cycle, causing visible signs of thinning, shedding, or balding.

Female Pattern Hair Loss

  • Medical Name: Androgenetic Alopecia
  • Typically occurs at an early age, for example during the late teenage years or early 20’s.
  • Female Pattern Hair Loss may also manifest itself following a period of hormonal change (i.e. post-menopause).
  • Affected Areas: Frontal and parietal (sides) of the scalp. Hair density is usually preserved in the occipital scalp, or the lateral area that extends from ear-to-ear in the rear of the head. Thickness is also preserved in the frontal hairline.
  • What to Look for: When styling the hair, the central “part” becomes wider over time, making more and more scalp visible when the hair is parted.

Telogen Effluvium

  • Medical Name: Telogen Effluvium
  • Predominantly seen in women who are in their 40’s, 50’s, and 60’s.
  • Telogen Effluvium may manifest itself as excessive thinning, shedding, or balding that may happen abruptly.
  • Recent studies have linked sudden trauma, namely stress, with the onset of Telogen Effluvium (ii).
  • What to Look for: Many women notice a decrease in ponytail volume when the hair is pulled back / tied.

What Causes Telogen Effluvium?

The most commonly documented causes of Telogen Effluvium include:

Stress. “There does indeed seem to be a link between stress, a change in hair follicle biochemistry, and more hair follicles entering a telogen resting state,” reports the American Hair Loss Association (iii). Several studies support this idea, demonstrating that high levels of stress may cause individual hair strands to prematurely enter the “telogen resting state” before eventually falling out. Examples of such stressors include ongoing chronic illness, divorce, or other significant life events in which the outcome is uncertain or feared.

Physical Trauma. Similarly to stress, abrupt episodes of physical trauma may also send hair follicles into a telogen resting phase. Examples include car accidents and other events that induce a forceful shock to the body.

Prescription Medications. Hair loss may be the side effect of certain medications like antidepressants (and other mood altering drugs), acne medications, and a variety of other prescription drugs. For a more comprehensive list, please reference this article on prescription drugs that cause hair loss.

Nutritional Deficiency. Hair needs certain vitamins, minerals, and amino acids in order to grow naturally. For example, deficiencies in vitamin A, iron, or protein may inhibit the normal and healthy development of hair. Learn more about the foods for healthy hair, and proactively prevent hair loss due to nutritional deficiencies.

Seek an Evaluation with a Team You Can Trust

If you suspect you are suffering with Female Pattern Hair Loss or Telogen Effluvium, you are not alone. Nearly 25% of all females experience signs of hair loss by age 35, and most cases are treatable. To learn more about the option that is best for you, schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute. Our team is comprised of South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, nurses, microscopists, and technicians, each of whom understand the challenges hair loss presents to personal, social, and professional life.

Visit the following page to learn more about advanced hair loss evaluations at the Hair Transplant Institute. Readers are also invited to call our front desk directly at 305-925-0222.

Sources for this article include:

(i) Perez, Sylvia. “Healthbeat Report: Strands of Stress.” 28 September 2012. Abclocal.go.com.

(ii) American Hair Loss Association. “Effluviums.” Americanhairloss.org.

(iii) See above.

Exclusive: Researchers Find Vitamin D May Stimulate Hair Growth

Exclusive- Researchers Find Vitamin D May Stimulate Hair GrowthIn an effort to find a cure for baldness, research teams from around the world are investigating ways to reawaken dormant hair follicles. These tiny bulb-shaped structures are located just beneath the surface of the skin (pictured left), and they supply growing hair with blood, oxygen, and other life-sustaining nutrients. When hair follicles become traumatized, damaged, or otherwise inactive, the growth of new hair stops and pattern baldness begins. In this way, an individual’s head of hair (quite literally) lives and dies by the health of the follicles beneath the skin. New research suggests that vitamin D, along with the receptors in the skin that bind to the nutrient, may play a significant role in promoting healthy follicles and hair growth.

Got Milk? Researchers Say Vitamin D is “Crucial for the regeneration of hair”

Thanks in part to wildly successful 1995 “Got Milk?” advertising campaign by Goodby Silverstein & Partners, we all know that the calcium and vitamin D in milk help develop strong bones and prevent osteoporosis. The health benefits of vitamin D were studied long before that campaign, but traditional research focused primarily on vitamin D and bone development.

Now, however, new research shows vitamin D may be “crucial for the regeneration of hair,” (i). Hair transplant surgeons have also credited the receptors for vitamin D—the tiny “keyholes” in which the vitamin “keys” fit when being utilized by the body—as critical in promoting healthy hair follicle function.

Researchers report that creating a vitamin D supplement to prevent hair loss is tricky, however. For one, too much vitamin D may cause calcium accumulation in the blood. In turn, calcium accumulation may cause weakness or problems with the kidneys. For this reason, researchers are “really aiming to manipulate vitamin D or vitamin D receptors only in the skin,” explains Dr. Oda of the VA Medical Center in San Francisco. This would help individuals better utilize the vitamin D in their system, rather than introduce more vitamin D at the risk of developing other health issues.

And while a vitamin D supplement that cures baldness may seem futuristic and fanciful, there are technologies available today that are designed to promote natural hair growth by stimulating hair follicles.

Enter: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) for hair.

Promoting Follicle Health and Hair Growth with LLLT

LLLT stands for low level laser treatment, and it is a relatively new and exciting technology for the medical world. LLLT uses safe, FDA certified lasers to stimulate cellular respiration by way of phototherapy. In turn, this increases the cell’s ability to produce energy. But how do laser-light exposure, enhanced cellular respiration, and increased energy production help to reverse hair loss?

According to new research, an improvement in cellular respiration leads a series of biochemical reactions that stimulate the delivery of oxygen and nutrients directly to the hair follicle (vi). Most important is the ability of the patient to receive comprehensive LLLT exposure on a regular basis—usually 3 times per week for about 20 minutes per session.

The Hair Transplant Institute of Miami is pleased to offer the LaserCap™ LLLT device for thinning hair. To learn more about LLLT for thinning hair, please join Dr. Nusbaum as he explains the effectiveness of the treatment and the LaserCap™ device in the video below:

Learn More About the LaserCap™

To learn more about hair restoration or low level laser hair therapy with the LaserCap™, please schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami.  Readers are also invited to call our front desk at 305.925.0222 to speak directly with a friendly member of our office.

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we understand that hair loss can impact your personal, social, and professional life.  We’re committed to making a difference in the lives and well-being of our patients, and we look forward to exceeding your expectations with only the best technologies and most effective procedures.

 

Sources for this article include:

(i) Wang, Shirley S. “The Search for a Baldness Cure.” 12 September 2012.

(ii) Brosseau, L.; Welch, V.; Wells, G. A.; De Bie, R.; Gam, A.; Harman, K.; Morin, M.; Shea, B. et al. (2005). Brosseau, Lucie. ed. “Low level laser therapy (Classes I, II and III) for treating rheumatoid arthritis”. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (4): CD002049. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD002049.pub2. PMID 16235295.

(iii) Jamtvedt, G.; Dahm, K. T.; Christie, A.; Moe, R. H.; Haavardsholm, E.; Holm, I.; Hagen, K. B. (2007). “Physical Therapy Interventions for Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee: an Overview of Systematic Reviews”. Physical Therapy 88 (1): 123–136. doi:10.2522/ptj.20070043. PMID 17986496.

(iv) Chow, R.; Johnson, M.; Lopes-Martins, R.; Bjordal, J. (Nov 2009). “Efficacy of low-level laser therapy in the management of neck pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised placebo or active-treatment controlled trials.”. Lancet 374 (9705): 1897–1908. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61522-1. PMID 19913903.

(v) Hamblin, Michael R. “Mechanisms of Low Level Light Therapy.” (2008): n. pag. Web. 17 Sept. 2012.

(vi) Hamblin, Michael R. “Low Level Laser Light Therapy.” (2012). n. pag. Web. 17 Sep. 2012. Click Here to Read This Article.

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