Articles Tagged with: female pattern baldness
Is Postpartum Hair Loss Normal?

Is Postpartum Hair Loss Normal?

Is Postpartum Hair Loss Normal? New moms have a lot to deal with. Adjusting to the new realities, responsibilities, and routines (or lack thereof) of parenthood can be overwhelming, and chronic sleep-deprivation doesn’t help matters. But for many women, the months after giving birth also comes with the unwelcome and unexpected sight of hair loss.

Postpartum hair loss – also called postpartum alopecia – is a common phenomenon. Up to 90 of women experience some degree of hair loss three to five months after giving birth, and a large percentage of new mothers experience excessive shedding, even hair falling out in clumps, during that time. The good news is that this hair loss is almost always temporary and hair growth returns to normal in plenty of time for baby’s first birthday party.

Why Does Postpartum Hair Loss Happen?

Every mom knows the havoc that their hormones wreak on their body during pregnancy. But the months that follow delivery also involve dramatic fluctuations in hormone levels as the body returns to its normal state. This hormonal whiplash takes its toll on hair as well.

Many pregnant women notice that their hair seems thicker and fuller than it did before their pregnancy. That’s because elevated estrogen levels increase the percentage of hairs that are in the growth cycle, while simultaneously freezing hair that is in the resting phase of hair growth. After childbirth, estrogen levels fall dramatically, and all the hair that was growing so beautifully starts to fall out. While we all shed hair regularly, at a rate of around 80 hairs per day, the extent of postpartum shedding can raise that number to closer to 400 hairs a day.

While you may not be able to stop postpartum shedding, changing up your hairstyle and keeping control of your stress levels can help you ride out this temporary condition.  Just as life slowly returns to a new normal as the months go by after having a baby, so too will your hair.

Call the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami Today If You Have Hair Loss Questions

While most postpartum hair loss is temporary, not all hair loss problems are. If you are concerned about or are experiencing hair loss and want to know what you can do about it, please contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our world-renowned physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases through advanced hair restoration surgery techniques and alternative non-invasive treatments.

To receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Progressive Pattern Hair Loss

Progressive Pattern Hair Loss Explained

Progressive Pattern Hair LossThe end result of hair loss is the same for everybody: hair that winds up on the shower floor, stuck in a brush, on your pillow, or pretty much anywhere other than your scalp. But how that hair falls out, where it falls out, and why it falls out can vary from person to person. People lose and shed their hair for different reasons, and those reasons will play a role in how baldness or thinning hair will manifest itself.

There are two primary hair loss patterns experienced by both men and women: progressive and diffuse. Understanding the differences between the two can help you identify your hair loss problem earlier and guide you as you seek options for stopping further loss and restoring your hair to a fuller, natural state.

Progressive Pattern Hair Loss

Accounting for over 95 percent of hair loss cases, progressive pattern baldness, also known as androgenetic alopecia, is a hereditary condition that causes hair miniaturization. This phenomenon causes hair follicles to become thinner and finer each time they progress through the growth cycle. Eventually, the follicles cease to grow at all and fall out.

Progressive pattern hair loss follows a familiar and predictable course. In men, it starts with shedding in the front of the scalp above the forehead that causes the hairline to recede gradually. This progresses to more noticeable hair loss across the top of the head, and finally toward the crown. In women, androgenetic alopecia acts differently, occurring throughout the scalp rather than in specific, isolated areas as it does in men.

Men are more likely to notice and experience pattern baldness earlier than women. 25 percent of American men see symptoms of male pattern baldness before the age of 21, approximately 66 percent of men suffer some degree of hair loss by age 35, and 85 percent of men see significant thinning related to androgenetic alopecia by age 50. About 40 percent of women experience pattern baldness but may not see any signs of thinning hair until the age of 50 or 60, long after the shedding starts.

Diffuse Hair Loss

As opposed to pattern baldness, which you can blame on your genes, diffuse hair loss is usually caused by environmental factors such as stress, hormonal imbalances, or trauma. These issues cause a condition called telogen effluvium in which hair follicles are shocked into a resting state. Since the follicles are not actively producing more hair to replace normal shedding, the thinning occurs in a diffuse pattern throughout the scalp. If the factors which are causing the thinning can be addressed and resolved, the follicles often return to their normal healthy state and fully regrow without surgical intervention.

If You See the First Signs of Hair Loss, Take the First Step Towards Fixing It

No matter how your hair loss issues become apparent, the first step towards fixing the problem is arranging for a comprehensive hair loss evaluation. Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of stopping further hair loss and restoring the hair you’ve lost.  Schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami today by calling us at 305.925.0222. We look forward to assisting you.

5 Benefits of an FUE Hair Transplant

Is Hair Health Important?

hair healthFor many men and women, hair health is not a priority. Their haircare routine is typically straightforward: shampoo, maybe conditioner and perhaps a little styling spray to look put together. Others take their hair health more seriously, particularly individuals who suffer from embarrassing hair loss conditions. But, does hair health truly matter?

The answer is multifaceted. Hair is a complex structure and has its own anatomy just like any other part of your body. At the base of hair – underneath the skin – there are living cells that work arduously to sustain growth, strength and shine. Therefore, the hair you see is often a reflection of your vitality and overall well-being. Improving the health of your hair isn’t just about looking great, it’s also about strengthening and supporting each strand from root to tip.

Hair Anatomy

Each strand, or shaft, is anchored by a follicle. The follicle is a tubular pouch just underneath the skin’s surface. Two sheaths surround the follicle to protect the shaft. The outer sheath runs alongside the sebaceous gland, which produces oils that naturally condition hair and give it its natural sheen. The outer sheath connects to the arrector pili muscle, and when contracted, causes hair to stand up – an effect more commonly known as goosebumps.

At the base of the follicle is known as the bulb, where cells build and nourish the shaft. These cells are connected to tiny blood vessels, or capillaries, which deliver hormones and nourishment to sustain healthy hair growth. When your body’s hormones are off balance or shifting as you age, the cells can’t re-build new shafts to replace everyday shedding. This is a condition known as androgenetic alopecia, also called male-pattern baldness of female pattern hair loss (FPHL).

Meanwhile, the shaft is made of a hard protein called keratin. The hair you see on your head, arms or legs is dead and no longer nourished by the follicle and its cells. Although it’s not living, the shaft is convoluted. Sometimes, an inner layer called the medulla is present, but this portion only exists in certain types of hair. The middle layer (which everyone has) is called the cortex, containing pigment to help give your hair its natural shade. The outer layer is called the cuticle. Most everyday hair care products designed to smooth or soften hair target the cuticle. Cuticle structure varies based on your hair type which can affect hair’s appearance. For instance, people with curly hair have drier, dull strands because sebum has a difficult time traveling down the kinks of the cuticle to condition shafts properly.

Why Hair Health Matters

Your hair has both cultural and social significance, which is why so many men and women who suffer from hereditary hair loss experience shame and discomfort with their appearances. Despite how much information we know about hair and its biological variations, human beings innately favor physical attributes in one another (and themselves) that suggest better health. One of these physical attributes is strong and voluminous hair.

It’s important to note that not everyone lacks beautiful, big hair because they aren’t healthy. While hair loss is sometimes indicative of an underlying health concern, most hair loss cases are due to predetermined genetics and hormonal fluctuations. Even pregnancy, one of the most natural (albeit magnificent) processes a woman’s body can undergo, modifies hair’s growth and form. Despite what human beings perceive, thinning and shedding doesn’t always indicate something is fundamentally wrong with your body. But, the emotional toll of hair loss certainly makes it feel that way.

If you suffer from androgenetic alopecia or another hair loss condition, improving your appearance by counteracting your hair loss can be a life changing experience. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we help hair loss patients boost their self-assurance by restoring hair to reflect the way they truly feel on the inside – strong, fit and vibrant. Call us at 305-925-0222 to schedule your hair loss consultation in Miami today.

female hair loss

The Emotional Toll of Female Hair Loss

female hair lossAlmost 40 percent of all hair loss sufferers are women. Despite the astounding statistics, male pattern baldness is more commonly discussed – and aesthetically accepted – than female hair loss. Famous actors like Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Vin Diesel make balding look fashionable. Women, on the other hand, rarely opt to shave their scalps, even while suffering with thinning or shedding locks. Instead, female hair loss sufferers are left with widening parts, limp locks and a diminished sense of self-confidence.

Men who suffer from hair loss can certainly suffer a blow to their self-esteem. For women, who often favor long and thick hairstyles, hair loss adds further psychological and emotional damage. Hopefully, better education and widespread discussion can normalize female hair loss and help patients find comfort in knowing they aren’t alone – and that treatment is available.

How Does Female Hair Loss Occur?

Female hair loss due to androgenic alopecia transpires due to the miniaturization of hair follicles, which causes strands to appear shorter, thinner or more delicate and prone to breakage. Over time, miniaturization encourages hair follicles to discontinue production, thus limiting the overall active follicle count on the scalp. Genetic hair loss in women rarely results in total baldness. Women who suffer from total baldness may have alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder, or chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, female pattern hair loss (FPHL) affects roughly 30 million American women. Female pattern baldness is the most prevalent cause of progressive hair loss in women. The symptoms of FPHL are a widening part and thinning crown, generally differing from the receding hairline seen in male patients.

Like male pattern baldness, female hair loss is understood to be a genetically predetermined condition. But, other risk factors include the following:

Underlying Illness

Lupus, anemia, diabetes, ringworm, polycystic ovary syndrome and thyroid dysfunction are all commonly associated with hair loss, which is why visiting a hair loss specialist or physician to diagnose your condition is critical. Hair loss is often the first sign of a more serious illness, so ruling out other motivating medical conditions helps physicians determine ideal treatment options while minimizing further health damage. 

Menopause, Pregnancy or Post-Partum

Hair loss due to aging can worsen with menopause, particularly when considering the massive hormonal changes during the change of life. Estrogen levels fall during menopause around age 50, frequently manifesting as thinning or shedding on the scalp. Similarly, women who are pregnant or who have just given birth might experience hair loss due to hormonal shifts.

Stress

After a traumatic event like a death in the family or job loss, hair loss is common. When your body undergoes severe emotional shock, normal functions like hair growth are put on the back burner. In fact, serious distress “shocks” follicles into a resting state, which means they aren’t active to produce replacement strands after ordinary shedding. Stress-induced hair loss is known as telogen effluvium (TE) and can resolve itself, assuming anxiety and tension dissipates. 

Poor Nutrition

Eating too little to lose weight fast often means you miss out on key nutrients that keep the body functioning. Hair follicles require proper nutrition to function, and eliminating these from your diet can harm the growth cycle. If you see hair loss while dieting, consult a nutritionist to review your caloric needs, current intake and dietary recommendations.

 

Women’s hair loss is treatable. Early detection helps increase your odds of reversing follicle miniaturization and regaining a healthy, full head of hair. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, patients suffering from female hair loss can undergo both low-level laser therapy or hair restoration surgery, depending on individual candidacy and hair loss patterns. To schedule a consultation to diagnose your hair loss condition and move forward with treatment, reach out to us at 305-925-0222.

Can Chlorine Cause Hair Loss

Safe Hairstyles for Long Hair

Can Chlorine Cause Hair LossGrowing hair long and strong can take years and determination, and caring for your lengthy locks is key. With long hair, you may be tempted to pull strands back from the face. However, many slicked-back up-do’s cause tension on follicles. Over time, this tension and strain can lead to follicle shock and traction alopecia, which disrupts the natural cycle of growth. This condition is one of many that manifests as thinning or shedding hair.

Everyone needs to tie their hair back once in a while, but traction alopecia prevention is important. Consider the following tips to create a safe hairstyle for long hair without thinning or shedding:

  • Loose Buns and Ponytails

If you want to pull your hair from the nape of your neck on a hot summer day or during exercise, opt for a loose bun. Avoid sharp bobby pins and rubber hair ties for a more natural, soft look. If you have heavier hair, pull strands back into a low bun or ponytail so the added lifted weight does not put additional strain on the scalp.

  • Beach Waves

Summer might be over, but beach waves are a good look any time of year. Put away the curling iron and let hair dry naturally to showcase your natural curls. To tame tresses, use an anti-frizz serum or natural oil that looks in moisture and gives hair a lustrous sheen. If you have naturally straight hair, you can still achieve soft waves without hot hair tools. Let strands dry in loose pig tail braids or a French braid overnight. In the morning, you’ll be left with soft, bohemian waves that can transition easily from the office to a night on the town.

  • Braids

When you’re a kid, pigtail braids are all the rage. As an adult, you can still incorporate braids into your everyday style without looking immature. French braids are both sophisticated and sleek, but keep weaves loose to avoid drawing tension to the scalp. You can also wrap a crown braid around your hairline for a chic, pulled back look without using a tense hairband.

Let your long locks flow naturally once in a while to de-stress follicles and encourage hair health. If you must use styling tools, limit heat exposure to special occasions or weekends instead of styling after each wash. Don’t forget the importance of a high-quality conditioner (free of sulfates) or intensive hair mask that keep locks moisturized and healthy throughout the dry winter season.

Does Balding Negatively Affect Work Life?

Hair Transplant Myths, Debunked

Does Balding Negatively Affect Work Life?Contrary to popular belief, hair transplant surgeries are not as obvious as they were in the past. Long gone are the days of obvious hair plugs and embarrassing surgical scars. With modern technology and advancements in the field, hair restoration surgery can be done under minimally invasive conditions for streamlined and natural-looking results.

Although hair transplants are increasingly popular among patients suffering from male pattern baldness and other hair loss conditions, there are still many falsities and misconceptions about the practice. In order to debunk some of these hair transplant myths, consider how we’ve helped revamp the practice:

  1. Scars are Obvious

While linear scars were more noticeable in the early days of hair transplant surgery, technology has helped the professionals eliminate obvious post-surgical blemishes. Nowadays, patients may see light scarring that is easily covered when hair at the donor site regrows. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, our surgeons make minimal scarring a priority in strip donor procedures. Dr. Paul Rose developed the Ledge Closure technique which helps direct hair at the wound site to grow through the scar line, virtually concealing any indications of a past surgery. This leaves patients happier with their overall results and more confident in showing off their fuller locks.

  1. Surgery = Plugs

Hair transplant surgery received a poor reputation in its early stages, when procedures worked to fill in balding but often resulted in an obvious plug-like look. Today, however, hair plugs are a thing of the past. We’ve replaced these former practices with advanced procedures that leave virtually no signs of transplant, just natural-looking regrowth. In fact, hair transplants are barely recognizable among the general public, so you can stay discreet with your hair loss history. In a 2010 study from the International Society of Hair Restoration, 85 percent of Americans could not identify a hair transplant patient.

  1. The Process is Painful

Most hair transplants do not involve much pain and only require local anesthesia to numb the surgical site. Some patients experience discomfort during the injections, but much of the ache is relieved by an oral sedative. Once the scalp is numb, patients won’t feel much of anything during the procedure itself. After the surgery, taking care of your scalp carefully for optimal results is key. Brushing or washing vigorously can damage the natural scabbing process, so be as gentle as possible in the few days following surgery. With follicular unit grafting, our surgeons shampoo and check healing the day after surgery. Overall, healing time can vary by person and individual health factors. Typically, patients are ready to be out and about a week after the operation with no discomfort. If you have a big event approaching, try to schedule your hair transplant surgery at least one month in advance to ensure scabbing and swelling has time to subside. 

Hair restoration is still a nuanced field and many patients don’t know what to expect in the early stages. But, for qualified candidates, new technologies make transplants relatively easy, effective and discreet. To schedule your consultation and determine if you can benefit from hair transplant surgery, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami at 305-925-0222.

women's hair loss

Short-Term Hair Loss Solutions

Short-term hair loss solutionsHair loss compromises self-image, confidence and emotional well-being. However, being proactive by scheduling a hair transplant, using topical treatments, taking prescription medications or undergoing low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a step in the right direction. While the aforementioned therapies are typically successful, growth does not happen overnight. In the meantime, patients have a few options to limit the appearance of hair loss while waiting for restoration treatments to take effect.

Hairpieces or Wigs

Wigs are a fun way to express your style. For hair loss patients, wigs might be necessary to keep up appearance and avoid embarrassment, depending on the individual’s sentiments about their condition. Many women spend years growing and grooming their hair long, strong and shiny, making excessive thinning especially upsetting. While wigs are typically safe, extensions, especially the temporary clip-in kind, are not recommended. These styles put excessive strain on the follicle at a time when follicle health is vital.

Keratin Hair Fibers

Hair fibers are used to conceal diffuse thinning at the root. These small particles provide instant coverage for a fast and convenient fix. After cleaning and styling hair, lightly sprinkle fibers over the thinning area. Then, lightly pat hair until the fibers blend in with your roots. Make sure to comb hair before use, as bristles can loosen the fibers from their place on your scalp. 

Hats and Coverings

Many patients suffering from thinning or balding locks rely on hats to conceal their conditions. Did you know you can wear a hat to conceal hair loss while treating your condition simultaneously? With the Capillus272™, a small insert containing laser diodes is placed underneath your favorite sun or baseball cap. From there, just wear the portable, battery-powered device for 30 minutes, 3-4 times per week. Cool (and safe) laser technology nourishes inactive follicles and promotes circulation to encourage growth.

Hair loss doesn’t have to put you into hiding. With a few simple steps, camouflaging your hair loss temporarily recuperates confidence earlier and can even expedite the growth process. For more information on permanent hair loss solutions with Miami Hair, such as transplant surgery, contact us at 305-925-0222.

Ludwig Classification

Fast Facts for National Hair Loss Awareness Month

August is National Hair Loss MonthSummer is still (technically) in full swing, but the final full month of the season is especially important for men and women with shedding or balding locks. August is National Hair Loss Awareness Month, and to encourage awareness both within and outside of the community, the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami has compiled the following facts about hair loss:

  • The American Hair Loss Association says over 95 percent of hair loss patients are men.
  • Upon reaching the age of 50, about 85 percent of men show obvious signs of thinning.
  • An estimated 40 percent of Americans who experience hair loss are women.
  • According to an International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) study, 112,409 surgical hair restoration procedures were performed in the United States in 2014.
  • The average age of respondents in the ISHRS study in 2014 was 49 years old.

Facing your fears and scheduling an appointment with a hair loss physician is the first step in the right direction to getting your hair back. With a personalized consultation, your doctor can develop a treatment plan to help you regain your former confidence and overall vigor.

Dr. Bernard Nusbaum and Dr. Paul Rose are two highly-qualified and recognized hair loss specialists in South Florida. Together, the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami can help you plan your hair restoration journey before it progresses further.

Dr. Nusbaum has performed more than 10,000 separate hair transplant procedures over the past two decades, acts as a Diplomate of the American Board of Dermatology and is a former President of the American Board of Hair Restoration Surgery.

Dr. Rose has over 20 years of experience and is a well-known leader in hair loss transplants, writing research-based articles and participating in clinical trials for innovative and industry-changing techniques. Dr. Rose was previously the President and Board Member of ISHRS. He currently serves on the Board of Trustees at the Hair Foundation.

Will Dandruff Cause Hair Loss?

Will Dandruff Cause Hair Loss?It’s estimated that dandruff affects nearly 1 in 2 adults across the United States and Europe. But will dandruff cause hair loss? Like scalp folliculitis, dandruff is a condition that affects the scalp. However, dandruff is a unique condition with different symptoms and side effects. Read this article to learn more about dandruff causes, as well as the risk for developing hair loss when the scalp becomes dry and flaky.

Is Hair Loss Caused by Dandruff?

To date, there is no clinical evidence suggesting that hair loss is caused by dandruff. However, anecdotal evidence among physicians suggests a possible correlation. That is to say, patients who experience dandruff also exhibit signs of hair loss. Before exploring treatment options, take a moment to review a few important facts about dandruff and hair loss.

  1. Dandruff is simply a visible sign that the skin cells of the scalp are producing new cells faster than normal. This results in excessive shedding of dead skin cells, which fall from the scalp as dandruff flakes. Dandruff can affect you in both the long-term and short-term, often forming as a side effect of another health or skin condition (see below).
  1. Dandruff is also a symptom of the following common skin conditions:
  • Eczema
  • Psoriasis
  • Stress
  • Seborrhic dermatitis
  • Vitamin B Deficiency
  1. Sometimes, a hair loss medication may cause dandruff. Minoxidil is one medication that may cause hair loss. Most often available under the brand name Rogaine®, this topical foam contains alcohol, which may dry the scalp and increase dandruff flakes.

How to Treat Dandruff and Hair Loss

Fortunately, there are treatments available for men and women who experience dandruff and hair loss. Special shampoos, laser therapy, and hair restoration surgery are just a few examples of the complementary treatments available to reverse the signs of both conditions.

Dandruff Treatment

Most hair loss experts and dermatologists agree that dandruff is easy to treat. Often times, patients can see fast and long lasting results with an over the counter shampoo designed specifically to treat the symptoms of dandruff. Alternatively, some individuals notice dandruff symptoms subside after adding just a few drops of tea tree oil to their shampoo. For others, especially those who have very light dandruff, a vigorous scalp massage while showering is enough to loosen and clear away dandruff flakes. Only a dermatologist or hair loss professional knows which option will be best for you, making it essential to consult a professional.

Hair Loss Treatment

Although topical hair loss foams like Rogaine® can worsen dandruff symptoms, prescription medications like Propecia® are a relatively safe bet. Some men experience sexual side effects while using Propecia®, however, leading many patients to try laser therapy with Capillus® as an alternative. Surgical hair restoration is another option to restore the appearance of hairlines, crowns, and other areas affected by pattern baldness.

Treating Dandruff and Hair Loss in Miami

Treat dandruff, before it has the chance to cause hair loss. Today, a variety of treatment protocols are available to help nourish the scalp, reduce flaking, and promote natural hair growth.

To learn more about treating dandruff and reversing hair loss, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami online or call 305-925-0222.

Is Hair Loss a Side Effect of Smoking?

Is Hair Loss a Side Effect of Smoking?Lung cancer is usually the first side effect that comes to mind when considering the harms of smoking cigarettes. But lung cancer isn’t the only problem associated with smoking; stroke, brain damage, tooth decay, cataracts, loss of smell and taste, and other cancers affecting the nose, lip, tongue, and mouth are also potential internal ailments following long-term smoking. Consider also the external side effects of smoking, which include premature aging, skin damage, and hair loss.

The Prevalence of Smoking in America

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), tobacco is the largest preventable cause of death and disease in the United States (i). More than 480,000 deaths are caused by smoking each year in America, with more than 41,000 attributed to the inhalation of secondhand smoke.

Even though it’s been widely advertised as a harmful and potentially deadly habit, 17.8 percent of U.S. adults still smoke cigarettes. About 76% of those, or about 32 million, continue to smoke everyday, significantly increasing their risk for tobacco-related diseases.

Smoking and Hair Loss

Inhaling cigarette smoke exposes the human body to over 4,000 chemicals, including 43 known carcinogenic compounds. Nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, arsenic, and DDT are all present in some of the biggest tobacco brands. Given the high exposure to such toxins, the body reacts in a variety of different ways to tobacco inhalation.

Here are the top four reasons smoking causes hair loss:

  1. Smoking reduces circulation to the scalp, which inhibits follicle revitalization and hair growth.
  1. Smoking cigarettes pollutes the blood with toxins that target your body’s natural cycles.
  1. According to the Department of Dermatology at the University Hospital of Zurich in Switzerland, cigarettes may disrupt function of hair follicle (ii).
  1. Oxidative stress caused by cigarette smoking is also tied to hair loss. Free radicals from smoking cause damage at the cellular level, decrease cell motility, and increase cell senescence, which is used to describe a live, but inactive cell that can no longer divide and proliferate. The aforementioned processes are all necessary for hair regrowth, and a lack of oxygen caused by smoking deters them.

Preventing Hair Loss from Smoking

If you are a smoker, quitting will not only help you maintain a full head of hair, but also allow your body to continue its natural biological processes without toxic disruption. You’ll be doing your internal organs, skin, hair follicles, and stress levels a favor by cutting out nicotine and tobacco products before they have the chance to take hold of your health.

Within just 20 minutes of quitting smoking, your blood pressure, pulse rate and temperature return to normal levels. In 48 hours, damaged nerve endings caused by smoking begin to regrow, along with a heightened sense of smell and taste. In one year, your risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart attack are less than half of a nonsmoker, and in 20 years you are at the same risk of lung disease and cancers as an individual who has never smoked at all.

Quit Smoking Today

If you want to quit smoking but lack the resources, many advocacy groups like Tobacco Free Florida help residents statewide access the tools to cease their tobacco habits, regardless of socioeconomic status. They offer a toll-free “quitline” at 1-877-U-CAN-NOW (1-877-822-6669), where smokers can speak to a Quit Coach who develops a plan toward your smoke-free lifestyle. You can also receive in-person coaching at one of their locations or speak to a representative online. Tobacco Free Florida’s services are free, allowing everyone willing to take the path toward health the chance to get involved.

Treating Hair Loss from Smoking

Although your internal health greatly improves the longer you’ve been a non-smoker, some side effects don’t reverse back to normal without outside help. If you’re suffering from hair loss as a side effect from long-term tobacco use, consider hair restoration treatment(s).

Topical treatments, prescription medications, hair transplant surgery, and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) devices are all viable treatments for smoking-induced hair loss. To receive a personalized plan, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our expert surgeons can help you diminish hair damage and thinning after smoking, allowing you to feel just as fresh and revitalized on the outside as you do on the inside.

Don’t let your appearance reflect unhealthy choices from the past. Contact Miami Hair at (877) 443-9070 or email drnusbaum@miamihair.com for your personalized treatment program.

Sources:

(i) http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/campaign/tips/resources/data/cigarette-smoking-in-united-states.html

(ii) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12673073

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