Articles Tagged with: female hair loss
4 Reasons Behind Female Hair Loss

4 Reasons Behind Female Hair Loss

For decades, stand-up comedians have joked about the many differences between men and women. But it’s doubtful that they would get any laughs if they started riffing about female hair loss. While many cases of hair loss in women arise for the same reasons they do in men, such as stress or genetic predisposition, the distinct nature of female biology and life changes are behind a significant proportion of female hair loss problems.

While you will need a professional diagnosis by a hair restoration physician to determine the exact cause of your hair loss, it is likely that if you are noticing an increase in hair shedding or thinning areas on your scalp, it is due to one of these common reasons behind female hair loss:

Menopause

Women going through menopause produce lower levels of estrogen and progesterone – two hormones critical for hair growth and follicle health. As these hormone levels decrease, hair growth slows while follicles become thin, brittle, and more vulnerable to damage.

Making matters worse, the decrease in hair-promoting hormones is accompanied by an increase in androgens – hormones that trigger follicle miniaturization on the scalp. This makes hair more susceptible to falling out.

The hormonal fluctuations of menopause also contribute to other mental and emotional conditions and lifestyle changes, which themselves can cause hair loss. These can include:

  • Stress
  • Emotional decline due to diminished self-confidence
  • Lack of exercise
  • Imbalanced nutrition
  • Dehydration
  • Damaging hairstyles
  • Medication

Pregnancy

Pregnancy causes wild fluctuations in hormones, as every mom knows. But these hormonal upheavals don’t end after delivery. The months that follow childbirth also see dramatic changes in hormone levels as the body works its way back to its normal state. This hormonal whiplash can take a toll on hair as well. 

Many women notice that their hair seems thicker and fuller during pregnancy than it did beforehand. This is because of elevated estrogen levels that increase the percentage of hairs in the growth cycle while simultaneously freezing hair in the resting phase of hair growth. After pregnancy, estrogen levels fall dramatically, and all the hair that was growing so impressively starts to fall out. While we all shed hair regularly, at a rate of around 80 hairs per day, the extent of postpartum shedding can raise that number to closer to 400 hairs a day.

The good news is that this type of hair loss is almost always temporary, and hair growth will return to normal in short order.

Traction Alopecia

If you apply constant tension to your hair follicles, you will damage, weaken, and ultimately kill them. This is called traction alopecia, and it affects women who wear certain types of hairstyles or engage in other destructive habits.

The five primary causes of traction alopecia are:

  1. Wearing unnecessarily tight ponytails, pigtails, or braids for extended periods.
  2. Trichotillomania, a psychological condition characterized by constant (and often unconscious) hair twisting, pulling, or plucking.
  3. Hairstyles in which hair is tightly wound for a prolonged period.
  4. Hairpieces and weaves that are affixed/clipped to the hair.

Anemia

Anemia involves an insufficient amount of iron in the blood and is one of the most common causes of dietary-related hair loss in women. Low iron levels restrict proper blood flow and reduce the amount of growth-stimulating nutrients that hair follicles need. Changes in diet and iron supplements can help, including eating foods such as spinach, kale, broccoli, and other leafy greens.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

New Study Sheds Light On Link Between Stress and Hair Loss

More Women Are Opening Up About Their Hair Loss Issues

Unfair and wrong as it is, society treats hair loss differently in women than it does in men. No one bats an eye when they see a bald man or one with thinning or receding hair walking down the street. But women who suffer from hair loss often experience a different level of embarrassment and even shame because of societal expectations about feminine appearance. Finally, however, women with hair loss issues are speaking out about what is a very common phenomenon, trying to remove the stigma and change perspectives about female hair loss.

Earlier in 2020, Rep. Ayanna Presley made headlines by speaking openly and proudly about her struggles with alopecia. More recently, a series of TikTok videos have gone viral in which a young woman from Oklahoma discusses her hair loss journey.

What Makes Hair Loss In Women Different

The emotional and psychological impact of hair loss in women and the way it is viewed by society at large are not the only things that distinguish male and female hair loss. Many hair loss cases in women share the same cause as most cases of hair loss in men: androgenetic alopecia. But the way women typically lose hair – in a diffuse pattern throughout the scalp rather than in distinct patches – is different than for men. And women also shed hair for reasons specific to their gender, including the hormonal fluctuations that accompany pregnancy, childbirth, and menopause.

Diffuse Hair Loss Patterns In Women

Androgenetic alopecia in men follows a familiar and predictable pattern. It begins with shedding in the front that causes gradual receding of the hairline. This progresses to more noticeable hair loss across the top of the head, and finally toward the crown. Hair remains relatively robust in the back and sides of the head of most men who have pattern baldness.

In women, androgenetic alopecia usually progresses differently. Instead of losing hair in isolated areas, women tend to experience hair loss throughout the scalp. This diffuse pattern of hair loss in women makes it a challenge to safely extract the donor hair necessary for a transplant. In women, potential donor hairs share space with thinning areas. That means these hairs also share the same problems that caused neighboring hairs to fall out. That also means the follicles won’t likely survive and thrive if transplanted to a recipient area.

Female Hair Transplant Candidates

While a relatively small percentage of women are good candidates for hair transplant surgery, the procedure can help restore hair in women with certain types of hair loss issues. Specifically, women with the following conditions should discuss the possibility of a hair transplant with their hair restoration surgeon:

  • Women who have suffered hair loss due to traction alopecia.
  • Women who have had previous cosmetic surgery and are concerned about hair loss around the incision sites.
  • Women who have pattern baldness that manifests itself similarly to how it does in men and have a donor area unaffected by androgenetic alopecia.
  • Women who experience hair loss due to trauma.
  • Women with alopecia marginalis, a condition that appears very similar to traction alopecia.

There Is No Shame In Hair Loss. But If You Want To Do Something About It, Call The Miami Hair Institute Today

We are glad to see that female hair loss issues are emerging from the shadows and that women are opening up about their struggles. While there is no shame in hair loss, many women want to find ways to address it.

For men and women alike, the first step towards addressing hair loss is arranging for a comprehensive evaluation as soon as possible. Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of restoring your hair — and regaining your confidence.

Schedule an appointment with the Miami Hair Institute today by calling 305.925.0222. We look forward to assisting you.

Is Postpartum Hair Loss Normal?

Is Postpartum Hair Loss Normal?

Is Postpartum Hair Loss Normal? New moms have a lot to deal with. Adjusting to the new realities, responsibilities, and routines (or lack thereof) of parenthood can be overwhelming, and chronic sleep-deprivation doesn’t help matters. But for many women, the months after giving birth also comes with the unwelcome and unexpected sight of hair loss.

Postpartum hair loss – also called postpartum alopecia – is a common phenomenon. Up to 90 of women experience some degree of hair loss three to five months after giving birth, and a large percentage of new mothers experience excessive shedding, even hair falling out in clumps, during that time. The good news is that this hair loss is almost always temporary and hair growth returns to normal in plenty of time for baby’s first birthday party.

Why Does Postpartum Hair Loss Happen?

Every mom knows the havoc that their hormones wreak on their body during pregnancy. But the months that follow delivery also involve dramatic fluctuations in hormone levels as the body returns to its normal state. This hormonal whiplash takes its toll on hair as well.

Many pregnant women notice that their hair seems thicker and fuller than it did before their pregnancy. That’s because elevated estrogen levels increase the percentage of hairs that are in the growth cycle, while simultaneously freezing hair that is in the resting phase of hair growth. After childbirth, estrogen levels fall dramatically, and all the hair that was growing so beautifully starts to fall out. While we all shed hair regularly, at a rate of around 80 hairs per day, the extent of postpartum shedding can raise that number to closer to 400 hairs a day.

While you may not be able to stop postpartum shedding, changing up your hairstyle and keeping control of your stress levels can help you ride out this temporary condition.  Just as life slowly returns to a new normal as the months go by after having a baby, so too will your hair.

Call the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami Today If You Have Hair Loss Questions

While most postpartum hair loss is temporary, not all hair loss problems are. If you are concerned about or are experiencing hair loss and want to know what you can do about it, please contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our world-renowned physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases through advanced hair restoration surgery techniques and alternative non-invasive treatments.

To receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Treatments for Hair Loss During Menopause

Menopause and Hair Loss

Menopausal Hair LossLife is full of inevitable and unavoidable transitions. For women, menopause is perhaps the most impactful of these changes – physically, psychologically, and emotionally. Many aspects of menopause caused by fluctuating hormone levels are uncomfortable and undesirable, including hot flashes, mood swings, and irregular menstruation. For a lot of women, menopause also leads to hair loss. This can make the experience even more stressful and challenging, which in turn can make hair shedding even more noticeable.

What Causes Menopausal Hair Loss?

Women going through menopause produce lower levels of estrogen and progesterone – two hormones critical for hair growth and follicle health. As these hormone levels decrease, hair growth slows while follicles become thin, brittle, and more vulnerable to damage.

Making matters worse, the decrease in hair-promoting hormones is accompanied by an increase in androgens – hormones which trigger follicle miniaturization on the scalp. This miniaturization makes hair more susceptible to falling out.

The hormonal fluctuations of menopause also contribute to other mental and emotional conditions and lifestyle changes which themselves can cause hair loss. These can include:

  • Stress
  • Emotional decline due to diminished self-confidence
  • Lack of exercise
  • Imbalanced nutrition
  • Dehydration
  • Damaging hairstyles
  • Medication

Menopausal Hair Loss Treatment

Fortunately, menopausal hair loss is treatable. The Hair Transplant Institute of Miami understands how draining this life change can be for women, particularly when it includes hair loss. We work with female patients to proactively restore their self-esteem through early detection, professional diagnosis, and optimal treatment methods.

These treatments include non-surgical hair restoration methods such as Minoxidil (available by brand name Rogaine®), which has shown success in slowing or stopping hair loss in women.

Low-level laser therapy for hair (LLLT) is a second non-surgical restoration method that can reduce hair loss and, in some cases, stimulate new hair growth in women. Safe, painless, FDA-approved lasers promote blood flow and nutrient delivery to the hair follicles, strengthening and encouraging follicle growth. Women are particularly fond of these “laser therapies for hair loss” because they are quick, convenient, safe, and effective.

Finally, women may elect to have hair transplant surgery, a procedure during which the patient’s own hair follicles are extracted from areas of healthy scalp and relocated to areas experiencing thinning or balding.

We Can Help With Your Menopausal Hair Loss

Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance for women to restore their hair to its naturally full, resilient, and beautiful state. To move forward with a hair loss evaluation, call the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami today at 305.925.0222 to speak directly with a member of our team.

scalp folliculitis

Scalp Sunscreen: The Easiest Way to Protect and Hydrate Your Scalp

Scalp SunscreenEvery inch of skin on your body is vulnerable to sunburn if exposed to the sun’s harsh rays for extended periods of time. This includes your scalp. Balding individuals or those with thinning hair are particularly vulnerable to sunburn on the scalp. The consequences of sunburn and overexposure to UV rays include not only short-term pain but long-term skin damage and an increased risk of skin cancer.

Understand that a sunburn on the scalp can not only be the result of having areas of thinning or absent hair, it can also cause hair loss, at least temporarily. A deep or severe enough sunburn can lead to inflammation which in turn can lead to a short-term hair loss condition called telogen effluvium.

But while you may be very good about slathering that SPF70 sunscreen all over your arms, legs, face, and torso, it can be easy to forget about protecting the skin on top of your head as well as your hair. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, exposed and unprotected skin on your scalp can suffer damage in as little as 15 minutes. If you are planning on spending time in the sun, scalp sunscreen can be the easiest way to protect and hydrate your scalp.

There are numerous sunscreen products that are specifically designed to be applied to the hair and scalp. Consider oils with UVA/UVB protection incorporated so you don’t end up with greasy strands full of thick, white sunscreen. These also protect the hair itself from the sun, which can fade color when it oxidizes.

To protect your scalp, you’ll want to apply sunscreen at least 30 minutes before going out in the sun and after every two hours of spending time outside. If you go swimming or are perspiring a lot, you will need to reapply the sunscreen that has been diluted or washed away by that moisture. For full-on protection, wear a stylish sunhat or baseball cap when enjoying the outdoors, which protects both skin and hair follicles simultaneously.

Here in South Florida, sun exposure and the potential for skin damage is a year-round issue. The changes in the seasons also present several other challenges for those worried about hair loss or who are currently experiencing hair loss issues. Seasonal hair loss is a common problem. Fortunately, there are ways to combat winter hair shedding, control hair loss in the summer, and protect your hair during the spring and autumn.

Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

No matter what the season, if you are concerned about your hair loss and are ready to do something about it, we invite you to schedule a hair loss evaluation at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Drs. Nusbaum and Rose are internationally acclaimed hair restoration surgeons with more than 40 years combined experience. Both Drs. Nusbaum and Rose are actively engaged in hair loss research and lecture widely. To receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Hair Shampoo

Best Shampoo for Hair Loss

Hair ShampooYou’re standing in the shower, watching in dismay as hair that just moments ago was perched atop your head now swirls the drain. When you realize you are having issues with hair loss, you want to address the problem as quickly as you can. You’ll want to call and schedule a hair loss consultation with a hair loss expert for sure, but you can’t do that in the shower without ruining your cell phone. You can, however, use a shampoo which minimizes hair loss and/or leaves your hair with a thicker, fuller appearance.

The internet is full of shampoos and other products which claim to restore or grow hair, but as with anything on the internet, you should be dubious before shelling out money on “miracle” cures. That said, there definitely are shampoos which, while they won’t grow hair, are well-suited to increase the strength and health of your hair, minimize damage, or make your hair appear thicker. Consider purchasing the following types of shampoo to combat thinning hair:

  • Hair thickening shampoos. The name “hair-thickening” when used with many shampoos is a bit deceptive. Such shampoos don’t actually thicken your hair follicles but can do a good job of making your hair temporarily appear Hair thickening or volumizing shampoos work by artificially swelling the hair shaft and depositing a thin film of the active ingredients on your follicles. Again, such effects are temporary and cosmetic; these shampoos don’t do anything to slow or stop hair loss.
  • Shampoo with natural preservatives. Like many consumer products, shampoos can contain chemical preservatives which, while extending the shelf-life of the shampoo, don’t extend the life of your hair and in fact may do the opposite. Look for shampoos and other hair-care products that contain natural preservatives including essential oils such as eucalyptus, lavender, or rosemary, jojoba, Vitamin E, and grapefruit seed extract.
  • Shampoos containing castor oil and argan oil. Castor oil is effective at killing bacteria which can cause hair folliculitis and also has the added benefit of relieving pain and itching where applied. Argan oil is rich in natural phenols which are beneficial to the strength and resilience of hair follicles. 

Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, our skilled physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases that can’t be reversed at home. Through advanced hair restoration surgery techniques and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering with hair loss.

If you’re ready to do something about your thinning hair, contact us online or call or office directly at 305-925-0222 to receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan.

 

Will Use of Hair Products Cause Hair Loss?

With more than 300 genetic bases for hair loss, what we come into this world with genetically plays an outsized role in the strength, resiliency, and growth of our hair. But genes aren’t the only things at play when it comes to hair loss. The foods we consume, the beverages we drink, and the lifestyles we lead can all impact our follicles and either contribute to or slow down hair loss. It would make sense, then, if what we do to our hair directly – the products we apply and styling techniques we use – also affect our hair health.

Styling Products Are Fine, If You Keep Them From Building Up

Many patients express concern about whether gels, mousse, hairspray or other styling products contribute to hair loss. Fortunately, there is little evidence that common hair products have any negative effect on our follicles if used correctly.

The key is ensuring that you wash your hair regularly to prevent such products from contributing to any long-term buildup of sebum-based plaque. When combined with pollutants, oils, and sweat, this buildup could lead to a condition called scalp folliculitis. Over time, the irritation that is the most noticeable symptom of folliculitis may make it impossible for the hair follicle to support a normal hair growth cycle. This irritation can become so severe that it damages the hair follicle entirely, rendering it incapable of producing any hair at all.

Again, however, it is not styling products themselves which cause any damage to your hair or lead to hair loss, it is the failure to keep those products from building up on the scalp. So long as you wash your hair and don’t overuse gel, pomade, or other substances, you can keep on using whatever styling product makes your hair look like you want it to without worrying that it will lead to hair loss.

Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, our skilled physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases that can’t be reversed at home or through changes in lifestyle or diet. Through advanced hair restoration surgery techniques and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering with hair loss.

To receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call or office directly at 305-925-0222.

women's hair loss

How Does Men and Women’s Hair Loss Differ?

women's hair lossFor decades, stand-up comedians have made jokes about the differences between men and women. While losing hair is no laughing matter, and men and women’s hair loss share commonalities, there are a few important distinctions between the causes, manifestations, and treatment depending on sex.

Causes

We’ll start with what men and women’s hair loss has in common. The reasons behind pattern baldness in both sexes largely come down to something we all share: genetics. Over 95 percent of hair loss cases in men and women are caused by androgenetic alopecia, a hereditary hair loss condition that affects over 3 million Americans annually.

As the name implies, androgenic alopecia involves hormones called androgens. These hormones, which include testosterone, play an important part in male sexual development. They also play a central role in hair growth for both sexes. Testosterone produces a by-product known as dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Men and women who suffer from pattern baldness have a genetic sensitivity to DHT that results in shrinking hair follicles, which ultimately stop producing viable hair to replace the hair that we all lose on a regular basis.

Additional factors distinct to women can also lead to hair loss, such as hormonal and other changes caused by menopause.

Manifestations

Androgenetic alopecia may share a common origin in men and women, but the distinct ways in which androgenetic alopecia typically manifests itself – and how that impacts when hair loss is first noticed – is perhaps the biggest difference between the sexes when it comes to hair loss.

Men are more likely to notice and experience pattern baldness earlier than women. A quarter of American men see symptoms of male pattern baldness before the age of 21, approximately 66 percent of men experience some degree of loss by the age of 35, and 85 percent of men see significant thinning related to androgenetic alopecia by age 50. Most women, however, do not notice any signs of thinning or balding hair until the age of 50 or 60, long after the condition has already begun.  

This gap between when men and women typically notice they have a problem with hair loss is due to the different ways men and women typically lose hair as a result of androgenetic alopecia. In men, androgenetic alopecia follows a relatively predictable and familiar pattern that starts with shedding in the frontal hairline. This leads to more pronounced hair loss across the top of the head, and finally toward the crown. Since this hair loss in men occurs in distinct areas of the scalp, it is relatively easy to see it happening while it is happening

In women, however, androgenetic alopecia progresses differently. Instead of losing hair in isolated areas, women’s hair loss tends to occur throughout the scalp, resulting in thinning hair that can be more difficult to detect than a receding hairline or bald spot on the top of the head. Fortunately. there are warning signs of hair loss in women that facilitate faster action. Early detection is critical, as all medical therapies are most effective if initiated in the earlier stages of hair loss.

Treatment

A wide range of treatments can be used to address both men and women’s hair loss. The nature and degree of hair loss in the individual patient help determine the most effective treatment. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we have developed a comprehensive, holistic approach to evaluating and treating patients with hair loss, and leverage the very latest scientific advancements at our state-of-the art facility.

 

For men and women alike, the first step towards addressing hair loss is arranging for an evaluation as soon as possible. Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of restoring your hair — and regaining your confidence. Let us help you reclaim a healthy, vibrant, and full head of hair. Schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami today by calling 305.925.0222. We look forward to assisting you.

What is Menopausal Hair Loss?

menopausal hair lossHot flashes, mood swings, irregular menstruation – menopause is a stressful time in any woman’s life. One of the lesser-known side effects during the change of life is menopausal hair loss. As the body adjusts to fluctuating hormone levels, women may notice general thinning and shedding across the scalp. Unlike male-pattern baldness, which typically materializes on the hairline and crown, menopausal hair loss is diffuse.

When menopause hits, women produce lower levels of estrogen and progesterone – two hormones responsible for hair growth and follicle health. As these hormones dip, hair growth slows while strands become thin and brittle. After estrogen and progesterone levels fall, androgens (male hormones) increase. Androgens trigger follicle miniaturization on the scalp. Sometimes, androgens cause an increase in facial hair, which is why women suffering from menopausal hair loss may concurrently experience fine fuzz around the chin and upper lip.

Aside from hormonal fluctuations, consider additional factors contributing to menopausal hair loss:

  • Stress
  • Emotional decline due to diminished self-confidence
  • Lack of exercise
  • Imbalanced nutrition
  • Dehydration
  • Damaging hairstyles
  • Medication

Menopausal Hair Loss Treatment

Fortunately, menopausal hair loss is treatable. The Hair Transplant Institute of Miami understands how draining the change of life can be, particularly when hair loss appears as a side effect. We work with female patients to proactively restore their self-esteem through early detection, professional diagnosis and optimal treatment methods.

Our physicians, Dr. Bernard Nusbaum and Dr. Paul Rose, are two recognized leaders in the field of hair restoration. We thoughtfully listen to patients’ concerns and objectives while providing hair loss treatment suggestions that best suit your diagnosis, lifestyle, expectations and goals. At our state-of-the-art facility, we are proud to offer natural-looking hair transplants backed by the latest technologies, professional-grade laser therapy caps for at-home use and stem cell hair growth treatments, among other innovative medical hair therapies. To book your appointment for menopausal hair loss treatment, call our office at 305-925-0222 today.

female hair loss

The Emotional Toll of Female Hair Loss

female hair lossAlmost 40 percent of all hair loss sufferers are women. Despite the astounding statistics, male pattern baldness is more commonly discussed – and aesthetically accepted – than female hair loss. Famous actors like Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and Vin Diesel make balding look fashionable. Women, on the other hand, rarely opt to shave their scalps, even while suffering with thinning or shedding locks. Instead, female hair loss sufferers are left with widening parts, limp locks and a diminished sense of self-confidence.

Men who suffer from hair loss can certainly suffer a blow to their self-esteem. For women, who often favor long and thick hairstyles, hair loss adds further psychological and emotional damage. Hopefully, better education and widespread discussion can normalize female hair loss and help patients find comfort in knowing they aren’t alone – and that treatment is available.

How Does Female Hair Loss Occur?

Female hair loss due to androgenic alopecia transpires due to the miniaturization of hair follicles, which causes strands to appear shorter, thinner or more delicate and prone to breakage. Over time, miniaturization encourages hair follicles to discontinue production, thus limiting the overall active follicle count on the scalp. Genetic hair loss in women rarely results in total baldness. Women who suffer from total baldness may have alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder, or chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, female pattern hair loss (FPHL) affects roughly 30 million American women. Female pattern baldness is the most prevalent cause of progressive hair loss in women. The symptoms of FPHL are a widening part and thinning crown, generally differing from the receding hairline seen in male patients.

Like male pattern baldness, female hair loss is understood to be a genetically predetermined condition. But, other risk factors include the following:

Underlying Illness

Lupus, anemia, diabetes, ringworm, polycystic ovary syndrome and thyroid dysfunction are all commonly associated with hair loss, which is why visiting a hair loss specialist or physician to diagnose your condition is critical. Hair loss is often the first sign of a more serious illness, so ruling out other motivating medical conditions helps physicians determine ideal treatment options while minimizing further health damage. 

Menopause, Pregnancy or Post-Partum

Hair loss due to aging can worsen with menopause, particularly when considering the massive hormonal changes during the change of life. Estrogen levels fall during menopause around age 50, frequently manifesting as thinning or shedding on the scalp. Similarly, women who are pregnant or who have just given birth might experience hair loss due to hormonal shifts.

Stress

After a traumatic event like a death in the family or job loss, hair loss is common. When your body undergoes severe emotional shock, normal functions like hair growth are put on the back burner. In fact, serious distress “shocks” follicles into a resting state, which means they aren’t active to produce replacement strands after ordinary shedding. Stress-induced hair loss is known as telogen effluvium (TE) and can resolve itself, assuming anxiety and tension dissipates. 

Poor Nutrition

Eating too little to lose weight fast often means you miss out on key nutrients that keep the body functioning. Hair follicles require proper nutrition to function, and eliminating these from your diet can harm the growth cycle. If you see hair loss while dieting, consult a nutritionist to review your caloric needs, current intake and dietary recommendations.

 

Women’s hair loss is treatable. Early detection helps increase your odds of reversing follicle miniaturization and regaining a healthy, full head of hair. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, patients suffering from female hair loss can undergo both low-level laser therapy or hair restoration surgery, depending on individual candidacy and hair loss patterns. To schedule a consultation to diagnose your hair loss condition and move forward with treatment, reach out to us at 305-925-0222.

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