Articles Tagged with: causes of hair loss

3 Underlying Illnesses That Cause Hair Loss

illnesses and hair lossHair loss can be a problem in and of itself, caused by a condition or factors which have no other significant health effects. For example, this is the case with androgenetic alopecia, a hereditary hair loss condition that affects over three million Americans annually and is responsible for over 95 percent of hair loss cases in men and women. Sometimes, however, hair loss is an unfortunate result of other serious underlying medical conditions. When hair loss is caused by other illnesses, it can still be effectively addressed in conjunction with treatment for the condition which is responsible for the loss.

Some of the more well-known and common illnesses which can cause hair loss include:

Lupus

A chronic and often painful autoimmune disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, commonly called lupus, afflicts at least 1.5 million Americans according to the Lupus Foundation of America. Lupus disproportionately affects women – it is nine times more common in women than in men – and hair loss is one of many unfortunate symptoms of this condition, along with severe fatigue, joint pain, joint swelling, headaches, and a rash on the cheeks and nose (known as “butterfly rash”).

Lupus causes the body’s immune system to create antibodies which attack healthy cells and tissue. This includes hair follicles. The antibodies cause the hair shaft to be rejected by the body, resulting in hair loss. Lupus symptoms tend to cyclical, coming and going between flare-ups and remission, which means hair may grow back naturally in some cases, only to again fall out. If, however, scarring occurs in affected hair follicles, the loss can be permanent.

Thyroid Disease

Found in our necks, the thyroid gland creates and releases hormones throughout the body. When the thyroid is not functioning properly, either by releasing too many hormones (hyperthyroidism) or too few (hypothyroidism), it can throw off the body’s natural functioning and cause many unwanted conditions. Since hormones are the fuel behind hair growth, a disruption in hormone production caused by a compromised thyroid will have a direct impact on hair growth, retention, and loss.

Diabetes

The high blood sugar levels which are at the heart of diabetes can wreak havoc on the body and cause a wide range of physical disruptions. Diabetes can cause hair loss when those elevated blood sugar levels interact with and change the shape of red blood cells. Misshapen red blood cells have a more difficult time traveling through smaller blood vessels, including the capillaries that supply vital blood to hair follicles. When that blood flow is disrupted, follicles may die and hair may fall out.

Not only can serious illness lead to hair loss, but many treatments for disease, such as chemotherapy or radiation therapy for cancer patients, can also cause hair to fall out. Hair loss in those dealing with a challenging medical condition can make an already difficult situation even more so. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we can help develop a hair loss treatment program that works in conjunction with treatments for the underlying condition causing that loss.

Schedule a hair loss evaluation to learn more about effective treatment with the world-renowned experts at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. To learn more about treatment, contact our clinic at 305-925-0222.

4 Hair Loss Myths Everyone Should Ignore

hair loss mythsHair loss myths seem to circulate around social media, no matter how much concrete and credible information is readily available. Unfortunately, the popularity and sheer temptation of self-diagnosis is difficult to overcome. Once you notice those few extra strands on your pillow or in your shower drain, placing blame on genetics, stress, diet, haircare or an underlying illness can be your initial (and often accurate) reaction. While these are the most common hair loss causes, outlying and unrelated factors are frequently accused of initiating excessive thinning or shedding.

Here are four hair loss myths that you should never believe:

  1. Women Don’t Have Genetic Hair Loss

Not only is female pattern hair loss (FPHL) a result of genetics, it’s one of the most common causes of women’s hair loss. According to the American Hair Loss Association, women account for nearly 40 percent of all hair loss victims. Keep in mind, androgenic alopecia – the clinical terminology for hereditary hair loss – does not affect men the same way it does women. Male-pattern baldness is more targeted with noticeable balding around the hairline, temples or crown. FPHL is more diffuse, causing a general thinning across the scalp. One of the first signs of FPHL is a widening part, though individual cases vary.  

  1. Tanning Causes Hair Loss

Contrary to popular notion, UV radiation is not linked to hair loss. This myth is rooted in the misconception that sunshine damages hair follicles to the point where they shut down and fail to cycle through the hair growth stages as usual. While excessive sun exposure could lead to damage, breakage and skin cancer, you don’t have to worry about it affecting the volume of your hair.

  1. Balding is Linked to High Testosterone

At the pinnacle of all hair loss myths is the belief that balding men have more testosterone running through their systems. Although inaccurate, it’s easy to see where this fallacy lies. Dihydrotestosterone, or DHT, is a derivative of testosterone that is scientifically linked to hair loss. Researchers say that the amount of testosterone isn’t the issue, but rather the level of DHT fastening to hair follicle receptors in the scalp. Typically, due to genetics or other hormonal changes, hair follicles develop a sensitivity to DHT and begin to miniaturize. This process shortens the hair growth cycle and eventually causes them to stop growing new hairs.

  1. Hair Loss is Inherited from Your Mother’s Side

If you tell a friend you’re worried about going bald, they’ll probably tell you to check your maternal grandfather’s locks first. However, your mother’s side of the family isn’t the only piece of your genetic makeup that puts you at a greater predisposition of developing androgenic alopecia. You’re just as likely to inherit hair loss from your father’s side, so consider all relatives before you stress about the future.

Only qualified hair loss specialists and dedicated physicians can formally diagnose a hair loss condition. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we invite those concerned about thinning or shedding to undergo a comprehensive hair loss evaluation at our South Florida clinic. To schedule an appointment, call 305-925-0222 today.

New Research Reveals Over 250 Genetic Signals for Hair Loss

New Hair Loss Gene Discovered- APCDD1While male pattern baldness affects most older men, research on genetic predisposition to baldness has been minimal – until now. In a recent study published in the journal PLOS Genetics, a Scottish research team from the University of Edinburgh found nearly 300 genetic ties to hair loss, helping identify potential chromosomal markers of male pattern baldness.

The study analyzed over 52,000 male participants between the ages of 40 and 69-years-old. This is the largest genetic report on male pattern baldness to date.

“We identified hundreds of new genetic signals,” said Saskia Hagenaars, co-lead author of the study, in a news release. “It was interesting to find that many of the genetics signals for male pattern baldness came from the X chromosome, which men inherit from their mothers.”

Based on the genetic variants between a discovery sample (40,000 subjects) and a target sample (12,000 subjects) that distinguished patients with no hair loss and severe hair loss, the team developed an algorithm to forecast who may develop male pattern baldness. The higher the patients genetic (polygenic) score, the more likely they were to suffer from male pattern baldness. Among participants with a sub-median score, 14 percent showed severe hair loss while 39 percent had no hair loss. Meanwhile, 58 percent of patients who scored within the top 10 percent showed moderate-to-severe hair loss.

genetic hair loss

Fig 3. Distribution of hair loss by male pattern baldness polygenic score decile in the independent sample. Source: PLOS Genetics

For the most part, the genes identified are associated with hair structure and development. These findings could support early diagnosis and better treatment of male pattern baldness in the future.

 “We are still a long way from making an accurate prediction for an individual’s hair loss pattern,” said principal investigator Dr. Riccardo Marioni. “However, these results take us one step closer.”

As noted in the report, male pattern baldness affects approximately 80 percent of men by age 80. Balding can lead to substantial emotional issues, including diminished self-confidence, social isolation and depression. Past research has also linked baldness to an increased risk of prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Download and read the full study here.

The Big Picture: What’s Really Causing Hair Loss?

The Big Picture- What’s Really Causing Hair LossWhen treating hair loss, understanding the root cause of the issue is the first step towards finding treatment. Getting to the root of the problem enables physicians to offer treatments that are both safe and effective. Sometimes, hair loss can be caused by environmental stress or other behavioral problems that the patient can learn to proactively manage. For this reason, understanding why hair loss occurs is empowering for the patient as well.

If you are experiencing hair loss symptoms, we invite you to explore the following resources on the Miami Hair Blog to learn more about your condition. Please note: These resources are not meant to provide specific medical diagnoses or treatment recommendations. All readers are urged to schedule an appointment with a licensed and experienced medical professional to properly diagnose their condition and find effective treatment.

Understanding Pattern Baldness

Sometimes, hair loss occurs in a somewhat recognizable and predictable pattern. Two common examples are receding hairlines and thin or bald areas at the rear of the scalp, at the crown.

Men who recognize these symptoms may learn more about the progression of their condition by referring to the Norwood Classification for male pattern baldness.

Women who recognize these symptoms may learn more by referring to the Ludwig Classification for female pattern baldness.

Stress Related Hair Loss

Stress may cause a change in the biochemistry of the hair follicle, according to reports from the American Hair Loss Association (i). This change can prematurely send hair into a resting phase, or Telogen phase. Hair may cease to grow entirely, depending on the severity and duration of the experienced stress, as well as the way in which the individual recovers from the incident. This type of hair loss is particularly common among women and may be heightened, in part, by hormonal fluctuations.

To learn more, visit our guide on Telogen Effluvium.

Prescription Medications and Hair Loss

Prescription medications may effectively treat a number of serious health conditions. Medicines can have side effects, however. Hair loss is a common issue for individuals who take a variety of medications, including oral contraceptives, thyroid prescriptions, and more.

To learn more, readers are invited to visit our guide, Can Prescription Medications Cause Hair Loss?.

Hair Loss and Teenagers

Though pattern baldness is typically associated with older gentleman, hair loss is also a common condition for many boys and girls in their teenage years of development. Teenagers are perhaps most susceptible to the cruel way in which hair loss can negatively affect self-esteem, confidence, and social life, making it vital for parents and teens to understand more about the most common reasons hair loss may occur.

Read more about the Top 7 Causes of Hair Loss in Teenagers.

Evaluations at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami

Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance of restoring hair to its naturally full, resilient, and beautiful state. To learn more about a hair loss evaluation, schedule an appointment with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Our team represents South Florida’s finest hair transplant surgeons, registered nurses, and technicians, each of whom hold your pursuit of a fuller head of hair in the highest regard.

Readers may also call our Institute at 305.925.0222 to speak directly with a member of our team.

Sources:

(i) “Effluviums.” American Hair Loss Association..

Hair Transplants: Safe for Teenagers?

Hair Transplants- Safe for Teenagers?This health report is meant to provide basic information on how nutrition, hairstyle, and other lifestyle elements may contribute to hair loss among teenaged boys and girls. It is important to understand that a comprehensive hair loss evaluation with a certified hair transplant surgeon is critical in the journey towards a healthier, fuller head of hair.

‘Hair loss’ is not typically something our society associates with teenagers. However, a number of causes may contribute towards the occurrence of thinning, balding, or shedding hair at an early age. Things like genetics, poor diet, unconscious hair pulling, and prescription medications may each play a causal role.

Learn more by visiting last week’s article on the top 7 causes of hair loss in teens. After better acquainting yourself with the most common reasons for hair loss among teens, you may wish to revisit this article to learn more about available treatment options.

Hair Transplants for Teenagers: Are They Safe?

Unfortunately, teenagers are not typically good candidates for a hair transplant. In general, a “good candidate” is a patient whose hair loss exhibits a number of characteristics, including the following:

  • Diagnosable cause of hair loss.
  • Hair loss with a predictable progression.
  • Donor hair that may be harvested to produce valuable hair grafts.

Though the cause of hair loss can usually be determined, it can be very difficult for a hair transplant surgeon to accurately predict how the hair loss of a teenage patient will progress. This makes it difficult, if not impossible, to conduct a transplant procedure that will look natural in the end. Moreover, conducting a hair transplant procedure during teenage years may reduce the number of valuable hair grafts available for future transplant procedures.

Hair Transplant Alternatives for Teens

The Good News: If you are a teenager and you notice signs of hair loss, rest assured that you are not alone. There are a number of hair transplant alternatives that are available to reverse the signs of hair loss, including natural methods as well as hair loss medications.

Natural Methods for Reducing the Signs of Teenage Hair Loss

There are a number of natural methods that may help to reduce the signs of hair loss among teenagers, including:

  • Eat well. The food we eat has a profound impact on the way we look and feel. Hair is no exception. Visit our article on foods for healthy hair to learn more about the nutrients that are the building blocks for beautiful hair.
  • Got Vitamin D? Vitamin D is a particularly important nutrient when it comes to keeping hair follicles fully functional. New research even suggests that vitamin D may stimulate hair growth.
  • Like people, hair enjoys a stress-free situation. Traction Alopecia is a common cause of hair loss that results from too much tension being placed on the hair for a prolonged period of time. Hairstyles like ponytails, hair weaves, and dreadlocks may damage the strength and longevity of hair. Read more about the causes of Traction Alopecia to learn how to identify this easily preventable cause of hair loss.
  • Speak to your physician about your current medications. Certain prescription medications can cause hair loss. If you find that you are prescribed to such a medication, you may wish to discuss an alternative treatment option with your health care professional.

Teens, Hair Loss, and Medications

When natural methods are not enough, teenagers may benefit from the use of medications for hair loss. Such medications should never be taken without first consulting a certified dermatologist or hair transplant professional. After a comprehensive evaluation, the physician may recommend 1 of 2 popular hair loss medications:

Rogaine® (Minoxidil)

Minoxidil, most commonly known by the brand name Rogaine®, is an approved medication that helps to stimulate the growth of new hair among both males and females. It is a topical application, and it is designed specifically to treat symptoms of pattern baldness, or Androgenetic Alopecia. Other important things to know about Rogaine include:

  1. Available for use among both males and females.
  2. Extra Strength formula available, starts to work after about 8 weeks.
  3. Active ingredient is minoxidil, which has undergone extensive testing for safety and effectiveness.
  4. Topical application, usually applied twice daily.

Propecia® (Finasteride)

Finasteride, most commonly known by the brand name Propecia®, is available for use by males only. Its claim to fame is that it can maintain existing hair, and in some cases it has been shown to trigger new hair growth. Propecia is designed to inhibit the creation of DHT, a male hormone that can “shut down” hair growth at the follicle. Other important things to know about Propecia include:

  1. Propecia is a prescription medication.
  2. Propecia cannot be used by women.
  3. Propecia is a daily medication.
  4. In clinical studies for PROPECIA, a small number of men experienced certain sexual side effects, such as less desire for sex, difficulty in achieving an erection, or a decrease in the amount of semen. Each of these side effects occurred in less than 2% of men and went away in men who stopped taking PROPECIA because of them.

Learn More About Hair Transplant Procedures

Are you a candidate for a hair transplant procedure? Our clinic is home to the finest technicians, registered nurses, and hair transplant surgeons in Florida. Request an appointment online, or call our clinic directly at 1-877-443-9070.

Teens and Hair Loss: The Top 7 Causes

Teens and Hair Loss- The Top 7 CausesWe typically associate ‘hair loss’ with older individuals, particularly gentlemen who experience male pattern baldness. However, it is common for teenagers to also experience symptoms of thinning, balding, or shedding. When it strikes, hair loss can cruelly disrupt a teen’s sense of self-esteem, confidence, and social life.

If you are a teenager and you notice signs of hair loss, rest assured that you are not alone. There is a growing population of boys and girls between the ages of 13 and 19 who share your experience, and there are a variety of lifestyle changes that you can make to improve the health of your hair.

An important note to our readers: This special health report has been created to provide an overview of the top 7 causes of hair loss in teens. It is intended for informational purposes only, and readers must remember to always consult a physician prior to making changes in diet or exercise regimens.

For additional information, readers are invited to learn more about hair loss evaluations online or contact our Institute directly at 1.877.443.9070.

What Causes Hair Loss in Teenagers?

Alopecia Areata

Alopecia Areata is a specific type of baldness that occurs in concentrated, rounded areas. It may occur on the scalp or on other portions of the body. At times, Alopecia Areata may manifest itself in several locations at once. For example, hair loss may simultaneously occur on the crown of the head, the sides of the head, and on the arm.

It is estimated that somewhere between 1-2% of Americans suffer with Alopecia Areata, including teenagers. For individuals who are affected by this condition, a new study released by Japanese researchers in Tokyo has called the treatment for Alopecia Areata ‘favorable’.

Androgenetic Alopecia

Androgenetic Alopecia is the most common cause of hair loss, affecting an estimated 2/3rds of all American males. Though most common among males over the age of 50, this type of pattern baldness may still affect teenagers. Females, in particular, may experience Female Pattern Hair Loss during the final teenage years and early-to-mid twenties.

Female Pattern Hair Loss

Female Pattern Hair Loss is a specific type of Androgenetic Alopecia (discussed above) that may affect teenage girls following puberty. This condition is most easily identified by a widening “part” that makes more and more scalp visible when styling the hair.

Proactively practicing stress management and nutritional awareness are two important steps in dealing with Female Pattern Hair Loss. For additional information, readers may visit this article on the 6 Ways to Prevent Female Hair Loss.

Traction Alopecia

Traction Alopecia is another common cause of thinning or shedding hair among teenagers, and it occurs when an unnatural amount of tension is applied to the hair for a prolonged period of time. The good news: Traction Alopecia is one of the few causes of hair loss in teens that is behavioral. Like unconscious pulling or plucking (see below), hair loss that results from Traction Alopecia may be significantly reversed simply by identifying and halting the behaviors that cause it.

For more information, please visit Traction Alopecia: Causes, Prevention, and Treatment.

Unconscious Hair Pulling and Plucking

Unconscious hair pulling or plucking is often the result of 2 different behaviors: Styling, and Trichotillomania. When it results from excessive styling, the hair loss typically occurs along the eyebrows and among the eyelashes. This is common among teenaged boys and girls alike, depending on the frequency and intensity with which they groom their eyebrows and eyelashes.

The second form of unconscious hair pulling / plucking is Trichotillomania. A psychological disorder, Trichotillomania occurs when a teenage boy or girl pulls their hair until it is uprooted, often leaving large areas of thin hair, damaged follicles, or total baldness. The best course of treatment for this type of hair loss is to consult a mental health professional or behavioral therapist to learn more about why the behavior is occurring, and how behavioral modification can be implemented to reduce its incidence.

Prescription Medications

Prescription medications are commonly used to treat a variety of health conditions among teenagers. Thyroid disorders, acne medications, and contraceptive medicines are just a few examples of the most common medications that may cause hair loss.

For a more comprehensive list, as well as hair loss prevention tips, readers may visit this article on prescription medications and hair loss.

Poor Diet

We’ve all heard the saying: You are what you eat. The skin and hair are the most noticeable reflections of that age-old adage, mostly because they are among the first physical characteristics we notice about another person. Failure to eat well can make it very difficult for your body to get the macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals it needs to maintain healthy hair. And while eating well may not be enough to reverse pattern baldness, it can certainly help to improve the health and longevity of existing hair.

To ensure the most naturally beautiful hair possible, individuals of all ages are encouraged to get plenty of these foods for healthy hair.

Learn More About Hair Loss and Restoration

Are you a candidate for a hair transplant procedure? Our clinic is home to the finest technicians, registered nurses, and hair transplant surgeons in Florida. Request an appointment online, or call our clinic directly at 1-877-443-9070.

Causes of Hair Loss in Women

Causes of Hair Loss in WomenThe causes of hair loss in women may differ from those in men due to a number of factors, most significant of which is biology.  One of the biggest biological differences between men and women are hormones.  Hormones like testosterone, estrogen, and thyroid, to name only a few, largely dictate the outward appearance of both males and females.  This includes height, weight, and of course, hair.  Other causes of hair loss in women include genetics, nutrient deficiencies, and general health of the skin (in particular, the scalp).  This article has been created to help women identify the 6 most common causes of hair loss including thinning, shedding, and balding.

Top 6 Causes of Hair Loss in Women

1. Unhealthy Scalp

It comes as no surprise that certain scalp conditions may be causal factors for hair loss.  The scalp is the foundation from which healthy hair grows, and growth may be inhibited when the foundation is compromised.  Specifically, the following skin conditions may lead to hair loss in women:

  • Seborrheic dermatitis:  This condition makes may agitate the skin of the scalp, face, and torso.  When affecting the scalp, most individuals know this condition by the name dandruff.
  • Psoriasis: An autoimmune disease, psoriasis appears in the form of scaly red and white patches on the upper most layer of skin.
  • Dermatophytosis: Known by the common name ringworm, dermatophytosis is caused by a fungal infection and appears as a light red circular mark on the skin.

2. Thyroid Disorder

Thyroid disorders are relatively common among American adults, affecting a reported 5 percent of the population.  Thyroid disorders come in one of two varieties:  Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.  Both hypo- and hyperthyroidism may contribute to hair loss in women.  In the case of the former, the body under-produces the thyroid hormone and individuals may notice weight gain, persistent feelings of fatigue, and a general inability to concentrate.  Hyperthyroidism, on the other hand, is marked by an over-production of thyroid hormone that may cause other side effects like rapid weight loss, muscle atrophy, and irritability.

3. Telogen Effluvium

Another common cause of hair loss in women is telogen effluvium.  This disorder is characterized by unnatural thinning or shedding of the hair and is most commonly triggered by periods of immense or abrupt body stress.  Women who are pregnant, experiencing extreme weight loss, or feeling persistent mental/emotional stress may develop this scalp condition in which hair spends an abnormally short amount of time in the growing portion of the hair growth cycle.  This causes hair to enter the telogen phase (shedding phase) more quickly than is normal, increasing the rate at which hair is expelled from the scalp.

4. Androgenetic alopecia

The American Academy of Dermatology has named androgenetic alopecia as the most common cause of hair loss among both men and women.  Androgenetic alopecia is hereditary; the “gene for hair loss” may be passed down from parent to child.  Contrary to popular hair loss myths, androgenetic alopecia may be inherited from either the mother’s or father’s side of the family.

5. Alopecia Areata

Alopecia areata affects an estimated 4-5 million Americans, making this condition a very common reason for hair loss among women.  Though the precise cause of alopecia areata is not known, women who suffer with unhealthy amounts of stress or general illness are most susceptible to developing the condition.

6. Anemia

Anemia is caused be an iron deficiency in the blood.  This is marked by a low level of red blood cells and may be the result of a diet that is significantly lacking in iron rich foods like egg yolks, dark green vegetables, lentils, and artichokes, among others.  Anemia is also characterized by extreme fatigue and pale skin, as a low blood cell count renders the blood unable to transport adequate amounts of oxygen.

Learn More About Preventing Hair Loss

Early detection is the best means of identifying, treating, and overcoming hair loss.  To learn more, please visit our quick-reference guide titled Women and Hair Loss: Top 4 Signs.  If you are experiencing thinning, balding, or shedding hair, you are not alone.  A reported 20 million women suffer with hair loss in America alone, and there is a wealth of treatment options available.

Our clinic proudly represents the top team Florida hair transplant surgeons, lead by Dr. Bernard Nusbaum and .  To learn more, please schedule a hair loss consultation with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami or call toll free 1-877-443-9070.

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