Articles Tagged with: alopecia areata
prevent male pattern baldness

Types of Alopecia

Androgenetic alopecia – also called pattern baldness – is by far the most common cause of hair loss in men and women alike. But it is far from the only reason your hair may be thinning or falling out. Millions of Americans suffer from hair loss caused by other forms of alopecia every year. While each type of alopecia has its own causes and impacts, they all lead to the same disappointing and embarrassing issues inherent with losing your hair.

Here is what you need to know about some of the most common types of alopecia.

Androgenetic Alopecia

If your hair is thinning or falling out, the odds are pretty good that androgenetic alopecia is the culprit. Over 95% of hair loss cases are related to this hereditary hair loss condition that affects over three million Americans annually. Androgenetic alopecia causes hair miniaturization, where hair becomes thinner and finer each time it goes through the growth cycle. Eventually, these hairs cease to grow entirely and fall out.

Men are more likely to experience and notice androgenetic alopecia earlier than women, with 25 percent of American males seeing symptoms before age 21, approximately 66 percent of men showing some degree of loss by the age of 35, and 85 percent of men see significant thinning by age 50. Most women, however, do not notice or see any signs of thinning or balding hair until the age of 50 or 60.  

Alopecia Areata

This hair loss condition is caused by a direct attack on hair follicles by your own immune system and white blood cells. This assault causes the follicles to shrink and subsequently slow down hair production. In turn, this leads to sudden hair loss in quarter-sized patches which can progress across the scalp rapidly and unpredictably.

More extreme versions of the condition include alopecia totalis (Complete loss of hair on the scalp) and alopecia universalis (total loss of hair on the scalp and body). Hair follicles are not destroyed by alopecia areata and can typically regrow as soon as the inflammation dwindles.

Though not as common as androgenetic alopecia, which is the culprit in the vast majority of male pattern baldness cases, alopecia areata still affects two percent of Americans or roughly 6.8 million people. Unlike hereditary hair loss, which generally manifests later in life, alopecia areata typically occurs before the age of 30 and can sometimes be seen in children as young as two years old.

Researchers haven’t yet figured out the specific reason why the immune system would suddenly turn on hair follicles. However, there appears to be a strong genetic connection. Several studies have found that alopecia areata is far more common (1 out of 5) in people who have a close family member with the condition.

Traction Alopecia

If you apply constant tension to your hair follicles, they will eventually experience damage, weaken, and ultimately die and fall out. This is called traction alopecia.

The five primary causes of traction alopecia are:

  1. Wearing unnecessarily tight pigtails, ponytails, or braids for extended periods.
  2. Trichotillomania, a psychological disorder characterized by constant (and often unconscious) hair twisting, plucking, or pulling.
  3. Hairstyles that require hair to be tightly wound for a prolonged period.
  4. Hairpieces and weaves that must be affixed/clipped to the hair.
  5. Helmets, particularly compression-helmets like those worn while playing football, snowboarding, skiing, horseback riding, etc.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Top 4 Reasons Teenagers Experience Hair Loss

Top 4 Reasons Teenagers Experience Hair Loss

Being a teenager isn’t easy, but it can be even more challenging for a teen struggling with hair loss issues. Feeling different, being teased, bullied, or picked on because of hair loss can be devastating and disruptive for a teenager.

It is estimated that around three percent of all pediatrician visits annually involve a hair loss problem. Teenagers, as well as young children, can experience the thinning, balding, or shedding which we usually associate with pattern baldness in adults.

There are many reasons a teenager could be losing hair, and parents should always consult with a physician if their teen is experiencing excessive shedding or other visible signs of hair loss to determine the underlying cause.

Four of the most common causes of hair loss in teens include:

Alopecia Areata

Alopecia Areata is a specific type of baldness that occurs in concentrated, rounded areas on the scalp or elsewhere on the body. At times, Alopecia Areata may appear in several locations at once, such as on the crown of the head, the sides of the head, and on the arms. Between one to two percent of Americans experience Alopecia Areata, including teenagers.

Hairstyle and Product Issues

Teens can spend a lot of time – and use a ton of gel, mousse, hairspray, and other products – styling their hair. All of the chemicals contained in styling products can build up and damage hair follicles if a teen does a poor job washing their hair.

Similarly, many hairstyles popular among teens involve an unnatural and excessive amount of tension to their hair over an extended period. This can lead to a condition called traction alopecia. For example, wearing unnecessarily tight ponytails, pigtails, or braids for long stretches of time can damage follicles and cause hair to fall out.

Unconscious Hair Pulling and Plucking

Another behavioral cause of teenage hair loss, albeit one with a psychological component, is Trichotillomania. This disorder involves a teen pulling their hair until they uproot the follicles, often leaving large areas of thinning hair, damaged follicles, or total baldness. The best course of treatment for this condition is to consult a mental health professional or behavioral therapist.

Poor Diet or Eating Disorder

If a teen is undernourished or has an unhealthy diet, their body will have a difficult time getting the macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals needed to maintain healthy hair follicles. Sometimes, this can be a simple matter of eating healthier food, but teens struggling with eating disorders like bulimia and anorexia face more significant challenges to their health and well-being. While eating well may not be enough to reverse pattern baldness, eating foods for healthy hair can certainly help to improve the health and longevity of existing hair.

Learn More About Teen Hair Loss and Restoration Options

If your teen is struggling with hair loss, please schedule a hair loss evaluation to learn more about effective treatment with the world-renowned experts at the Miami Hair & Skin Institute. Please contact our clinic today at 305-925-0222.

When It’s Time to Consider a Hair Transplant

Alopecia Areata – What You Need to Know

By leaps and bounds, pattern baldness – androgenetic alopecia – is the most common cause of hair loss in men and women. But it is far from the only reason your hair may be thinning or falling out. Other genetic, biological, or environmental factors can directly contribute to hair loss, and understanding the underlying cause behind your specific condition is the key to developing an effective hair restoration strategy. One such cause for increased shedding or bald spots may be an autoimmune disorder called alopecia areata.

What is Alopecia Areata? 

This hair loss condition is caused by a direct attack on hair follicles by your own immune system and white blood cells. This assault causes the follicles to shrink and subsequently slow down hair production. In turn, this leads to sudden hair loss in quarter-sized patches which can progress across the scalp rapidly and unpredictably.

More extreme versions of the condition include alopecia totalis (Complete loss of hair on the scalp) and alopecia universalis (total loss of hair on the scalp and body). Hair follicles are not destroyed by alopecia areata and can typically regrow as soon as the inflammation dwindles.

Though not as common as androgenetic alopecia, which is the culprit in the vast majority of male pattern baldness cases, alopecia areata still affects two percent of Americans or roughly 6.8 million people. Unlike hereditary hair loss which generally manifests later in life, alopecia areata typically occurs before the age of 30 and can sometimes be seen in children as young as two years old.

Causes of Alopecia Areata

Researchers haven’t yet pinpointed the specific reason why the body’s immune system would suddenly turn on hair follicles, but there does appear to be a clear genetic connection. Studies have found that alopecia areata is far more common (1 out of 5) in people who have a close family member with the condition.

Treatment

No cure currently exists for alopecia areata. However, if you have been diagnosed with the condition, there is hope and help available. 

The first piece of good news is that alopecia areata does not destroy hair follicles and they typically regrow as soon as the inflammation dwindles. Once hair regrows, it may be permanent or the condition may flare up again, causing another round of hair loss. 

Additionally, there are several ways to treat the condition and mitigate the hair loss it causes. Corticosteroids, powerful anti-inflammatory medications, are often prescribed, as are other drugs including Minoxidil and those used to treat autoimmune disorders.

The Miami Hair & Skin Institute Can Help You With Alopecia Areata-Related Hair Loss

For those dealing with a challenging medical condition like an autoimmune disease, hair loss can make an already stressful situation even more challenging. At the Miami Hair & Skin Institute, we help those suffering from autoimmune disease-related hair loss, including alopecia areata, develop a hair restoration program that works in conjunction with treatment for the underlying autoimmune condition causing that loss. 

Schedule a hair loss evaluation today to learn more about our effective treatments by contacting our clinic at 305-925-0222.

Hair Transplants- Safe for Teenagers?

Children’s Hair Loss: What You Need to Know

Children's Hair LossIt can be hard to be a kid sometimes. Things can be even more difficult for a child who is losing their hair. Feeling different, being picked on, teased, or bullied because of hair loss can be devastating and disruptive for a child. But there are solutions that can address this issue, which is more common than you might think.

It is estimated that approximately 3 percent of all pediatrician visits annually involve a hair loss problem. Young children as well as teenagers can experience the symptoms of thinning, balding, or shedding which we normally associate with male pattern baldness in adult men.

There are many reasons a child could suffer from hair loss, and you should always consult with a physician if you notice your child losing hair. Some of the most common causes of hair loss in children include:

Alopecia Areata

Alopecia Areata is a specific type of baldness that occurs in concentrated, rounded areas. It may occur on the scalp or on other portions of the body. At times, Alopecia Areata may manifest itself in several locations at once. For example, hair loss may simultaneously occur on the crown of the head, the sides of the head, and on the arm.

It is estimated that somewhere between 1-2% of Americans suffer with Alopecia Areata, including children.

Tinea capitis

This unpleasant infection, commonly called ringworm of the scalp, is a frequent culprit in children’s hair loss. It often appears as round or oval scaly patches of hair loss on the scalp. It can usually be treated with anti-biotics.

Hairstyle Issues

If a child or teenager applies an unnatural and excessive amount of tension to their hair over an extended period of time, it can cause a condition known as traction alopecia. For example, wearing unnecessarily tight ponytails, pigtails, or braids for a long period of time can cause hair to become damaged and fall out. Since this condition is a behavioral one as opposed to a genetic condition, it can be easily remedied simply by identifying and halting the behaviors that cause it.

Unconscious Hair Pulling and Plucking

Another behavioral cause of children’s hair loss, albeit one with a psychological component, is Trichotillomania. This disorder occurs when a child or teenager pulls their hair until it is uprooted, often leaving large areas of thin hair, damaged follicles, or total baldness. The best course of treatment for this type of hair loss is to consult a mental health professional or behavioral therapist to learn more about why the behavior is occurring, and how behavioral modification can be implemented to reduce this harmful conduct.

Poor Diet

If a child is malnourished or has an unhealthy diet, their body will have a hard time getting the macronutrients, vitamins, and minerals it needs to maintain healthy hair. While eating well may not be enough to reverse pattern baldness, eating foods for healthy hair can certainly help to improve the health and longevity of existing hair.

Learn More About Hair Loss and Restoration

Schedule a hair loss evaluation to learn more about effective treatment with the world-renowned experts at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Please contact our clinic today at 305-925-0222.

notice hair loss

3 Steps to Take When You First Notice Hair Loss

notice hair lossWhen you first notice hair loss, you probably won’t have a receding hairline or thinning crown just yet. While these are characteristic symptoms of male pattern baldness – medically known as androgenic alopecia, or hereditary hair loss – progression doesn’t appear overnight. First, you may notice excessive amounts of hair stuck to your pillowcase or scattered across the floor of your shower. So, what do you do when these indications transpire?

First, stress may only make your situation worse. Chronic anxiety is linked with a hair loss condition called telogen effluvium (TE). Any persistent or ongoing mental anguish – perhaps caused by a change in your appearance – could further aggravate an existing hair loss condition.

When the initial signs of balding are recognized, remain calm and follow these three steps.

1. Contact a Hair Loss Doctor

The sooner you start hair loss treatment after you first notice hair loss, the easier it is to restore follicles with non-invasive solutions such as Minoxidil topical foams and/or low-level laser therapy caps. Male-pattern baldness is often caused by a process called follicle miniaturization, by which an overabundance of a testosterone byproduct called dihydrotestosterone (DHT) interferes with healthy follicle function. Over time, DHT causes hair follicles to shrink to the point where they are unable to sustain normal growth. When these follicles stop growing, hair ceases to grow and balding becomes apparent. Visiting a hair loss doctor for a comprehensive hair loss evaluation and diagnosis early on is highly recommended. A formal diagnosis will also rule out any underlying medical conditions or illnesses that could, theoretically, contribute to your hair loss.

2. Understand Your Condition

Hair loss is different for everyone and there’s more than one type of hair loss to consider when you first notice hair loss.

Androgenic alopecia is the most predominant, affecting around 85 percent of men and approximately half of all women by the age of 50.

Although the exact statistics are unknown, the presumed second most prevalent type of hair loss is telogen effluvium (TE), a (typically) temporary hair loss condition caused by emotional trauma or nutritional deficiencies.

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder that results in sudden, noticeable bald patches across the scalp and, sometimes, the face and/or body. Around 200,000 cases of alopecia areata are diagnosed every year.

Traction alopecia is occasionally caused by purposeful external pulling. Actively pulling out hairs can be a response to anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), depression or other mental health issues. Certain hair accessories or constricting hairstyles can also lead to inadvertent hair loss classified under traction alopecia.

3. Consider Your Options

Between laser therapy caps, stem cell treatments, hair transplant surgery and topical or oral medications, hair loss patients have many treatment methods to evaluate. Fortunately, an expert hair loss specialist offers professional guidance and recommendations for optimal results based on your hair loss type, lifestyle and budget.

Even so, there are a few things to consider before you invest your money into any one treatment after you first notice hair loss, especially if you choose to manage it on your own. Non-invasive therapies like low-level laser therapy (LLLT) work on their own before hair follicles are fully inactive. After miniaturization is complete, hair restoration surgery helps fully transplant and replace nonfunctioning follicles to support healthy regrowth. Before or after surgery, topical treatments can be used to foster a healthier environment on the scalp and encourage optimal hair transplant results. Fortunately, hair transplants have undergone drastic and positive shifts over the last few decades. Expert physicians like Dr. Paul Rose and Dr. Bernard Nusbaum have the experience, research and technology to deliver natural-looking hair transplants with minimal scarring.

In some circumstances, lifestyle changes can help your hair grow back, but only if you suffer from non-genetic hair loss conditions such as telogen effluvium or traction alopecia. With the former, hair loss may be triggered by lack of proper nutrition or chronic stress, and the best solution would be to improve your diet or visit a mental health counselor. Traction alopecia is a hair loss condition caused by physical trauma, often related to hair accessories and extensions, and removing these from your routine is likely to improve such conditions dramatically. Even so, damage to the follicles may be permanent, so prevention and awareness are crucial.

To schedule your consultation and hair loss diagnosis, contact the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami at 305-925-0222 or book an appointment using our online scheduling form.

Ludwig Classification

The 4 Most Common Hair Loss Conditions

Ludwig ClassificationHair loss conditions do not discriminate. Despite how often we hear about male pattern baldness, women account for 40 percent of cases. Overall, 3 million Americans suffer from androgenetic alopecia, or hereditary hair loss, annually.

According to the American Hair Loss Association, approximately 95 percent of men’s hair loss is due to male pattern baldness, and 25 percent see symptoms before they reach 21-years-old.¹ Two-thirds of men experience some degree of loss by the age of 35. And by the time they hit 50, 85 percent of men see significant thinning related to androgenetic alopecia.

Meanwhile, half of all women experience thinning or shedding by the time they reach 50-years-old, per the North American Hair Research Society.² While female pattern hair loss (FHPL) can begin any time after puberty, most women either see thinning in their teens and 20s or in their 40s and 50s.

The medical community continues to work toward cutting edge treatments that satisfy each of the leading hair loss conditions, but it’s important to remember how much these disorders vary. Not only are men and women affected differently, but another three major hair loss conditions exist beyond androgenetic alopecia.

Alopecia Areata

Around 200,000 cases of alopecia areata are diagnosed per year. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder characterized as sudden bald patches that appear almost overnight, sometimes resulting in complete bodily hair loss. Although there is no cure for alopecia areata, patients are wise to address any underlying conditions related to their immune systems. Topical treatments can also help alleviate some of the hair loss associated with alopecia.  

Telogen Effluvium

Another leading hair loss type is telogen effluvium (TE), or stress-induced hair loss, which affects around 200,000 people in the United States per year alone. After a strenuous life event, hair follicles react to external strain by going into shock. While normal hairs enter their active and resting phase on a continuous cycle, patients with telogen effluvium have follicles pushed into their resting state prematurely. A few weeks or months later, patients may notice their hair falling out in clumps because the follicles aren’t active to reproduce recurrently lost hairs. Fortunately, telogen effluvium is a reversible condition that rarely requires aggressive medical intervention. However, TE can become a chronic ailment if the underlying causes of stress aren’t addressed properly. Chronic telogen effluvium most often affects women between 30- and 60-years old, per the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology.³ However, patients rarely see total hair loss during these fluctuating periods of on-and-off symptoms.

Traction Alopecia

Traction alopecia occurs when hairs are externally pulled out of the follicle from tight hairstyles or as an active response to anxiety or depression. Cornrows, tight braids and hair pieces can trigger traction alopecia symptoms, which then subside when hair is loosened and follicles begin to heal. For individuals suffering with mental disorders such as depression, a combination of therapy and counseling can provide a new outlet to minimize purposeful traction alopecia and other self-harm behaviors.

 

If you are experiencing symptoms of hair loss beyond the normal 50 to 100 strands per day, it’s time to contact a hair restoration specialist. At your consultation, Dr. Paul Rose and Dr. Bernard Nusbaum of the renowned Hair Transplant Institute of Miami will examine you for the common hair loss conditions. From there, we discuss possible underlying causes and recommend treatment, if necessary. As a leading hair loss clinic, we pride ourselves on active listening, open communication and optimal treatment plans. Call us today at 305-925-0222 to schedule your appointment.

 

¹ http://www.americanhairloss.org/men_hair_loss/

² http://www.nahrs.org/PatientInformation(FAQs)/FemalePatternHairLoss(FAQ).aspx

³ http://www.aocd.org/?page=TelogenEffluviumHA

Garlic Treatment for Hair Loss

Garlic Treatment for Hair LossIs garlic treatment for hair loss effective? A Canadian team of researchers has set out to test just that, aiming to evaluate garlic pills and topical treatments as a method for treating alopecia areata among children and teenagers. A number of children under the age of 16 suffer with alopecia areata, a condition characterized by sudden and patchy hair loss. Kids and young teens are limited in treatment options, as many are not candidates for topical foams, prescription medications, or surgical hair restoration. Researchers hope an all-natural treatment, like garlic extract, may someday alleviate hair loss symptoms along with the fear and social anxiety they cause.

Investigating a Garlic Treatment for Hair Loss

Researchers in Canada hope to find a hair loss cure in garlic, a bulb-shaped plant known to have natural anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties. The new trial has been announced on ClinicalTrials.gov. The researchers write:

The investigators propose to conduct an open label, prospective cohort pilot study using topical garlic concentrate (GarlicRich) for treatment of children with Alopecia Areata. Study medication will be applied topically on affected area of the skin daily for 6 months. Follow up visits will occur monthly to access the efficacy and safety of the proposed treatment.

A full posting of this study can be viewed by visiting ClinicalTrials.gov.

Alternative Treatments for Hair Loss

Only time will tell if a garlic treatment for hair loss can help to reverse the signs of thinning, shedding, or patchy baldness. In the meantime, there are only a few treatment options for children and teenagers who have alopecia. Some of the more popular options include:

Improving diet. The body needs a balanced diet, as well as a comprehensive assortment of essential vitamins and minerals in order to grow, heal, and achieve peak performance. This is especially true for growing children and young teens. Take a moment to review the components of a healthy hair diet, and think of delicious ways to incorporate nutrient-dense foods into every meal.

Managing stress. Stress can be devastating on a mental, emotional, and physical level. Telogen effluvium and alopecia areata, specifically, have been found to trigger and/or worsen hair loss. Children and young teens are encouraged to learn stress management and coping skills at an early age to not only prevent hair loss, but to improve overall health and vitality as well. Mindfulness meditation, sketching, coloring, light exercise, and journaling are all proven outlets for mitigating the negative effects of stress.

Wearing hairpieces. In some cases, hairpieces are the best solution for children and teenagers who suffer with various forms of alopecia.

This news article has been published by the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. Readers are welcomed to contact us online, or call our clinic directly at 305-925-0222.

 

 

Alopecia: Baldness Explained

Alopecia, or baldness, is a common condition that affects an estimated 2/3rds of all men around the world. Women suffer with alopecia too, though in lower numbers (estimated 20-30 million).

Alopecia is the medical term for hair loss, or baldness. The term alopecia is used by hair loss professionals to describe several types of hair loss that may occur in concentrated areas, which is referred to as androgenetic alopecia. Alopecia may also occur throughout the entire body. This type of hair loss is referred to as alopecia universalis. In other instances, an autoimmune disorder called alopecia areata can cause baldness and hair loss.

Signs of Baldness from Alopecia

Alopecia and baldness can be easy to detect, if you know what to look for. It’s important to note that baldness appears differently in men than it does in women. Male pattern baldness, for example, is usually characterized by 7 progressive stages.

Learn more about male pattern baldness. To learn more, visit this article on Norwood Classification for male pattern baldness.

For women, alopecia (pattern baldness) tends to occur in a more diffuse manner. For women, female pattern baldness is characterized by 3 progressive stages. This stages are explained by the Ludwig Scale, a chart that hair loss physicians use to identify what stage of baldness a woman is in, and how the condition can best be treated.

Learn about female pattern baldness. To learn more, visit this article on Ludwig Classification and female pattern baldness.

Expert Alopecia Diagnosis

Get an expert diagnosis on alopecia. Baldness affects an estimated two-thirds of all adult males and at least 20-30 million females globally. Rest assured, you are not alone in your struggles with balding or thinning hair.

Visit the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami online or call our clinic directly at 305-925-0222.

Treatment for Common Hair Disorders in Miami

Hair disorders affect men and women of all ages. Disorders of the hair can be seen in everyone from infants to fully-grown adults, causing abnormalities like hair shedding, thinning, and baldness. Despite being so common, hair disorders can inflict serious mental and emotional pain. Hair plays a significant role in our perception of things like status and attractiveness, so disorders that cause hair loss or shedding often undermine confidence, self image, and self esteem.

Three of the most common forms of hair loss and hair disorders include alopecia areata, andgrogenetic alopecia, and telogen effluvium. This guide has been developed to help Miami residents recognize the warning signs of each, as well as the different methods that hair loss professionals might use to diagnose them.

3 Common Hair Loss Disorders

1. Alopecia areata. When hair loss occurs in widespread areas throughout the body, hair loss professionals call it alopecia areata. When the hair loss occurs throughout the entire body, including the scalp, the disorder is known as alopecia totalis.

Warning Sign: Shedding/ hair loss occurring in circular areas.

2. Androgenetic alopecia. This is one of the most common types of hair loss. When hair transplant surgeons discuss male or female pattern baldness, they are referring to androgenetic alopecia and the way it causes hair to stop growing in a predictable progression (the pattern).

Physicians may use one of two different classification systems to diagnose and treat this type of hair disorder. The first categorizes male pattern baldness, and it’s called the Norwood Classification. For female patients, the Ludwig Classification is used. In addition to Norwood and Ludwig Classifications, surgeons may employ one of the tests described in the section below to better understand the severity and likely progression of the patient’s hair loss.

Warning Sign: Gradual thinning of hair (no shedding).

3. Telogen effluvium. This type of hair disorder occurs when hair enters into the “shedding” phase of the growth cycle prematurely. Telogen effluvium is most commonly triggered by periods of heightened stress, which can occur mentally, physically, or even emotionally. For example, the victim of a severe car accident might experience this hair disorder as a result of the physical and emotional trauma.

Telogen effluvium is more common among women than men, and it could take up to 3 months to take affect.

Warning Sign: Shedding (diffuse).

Testing for Hair Disorders

There are a variety of ways hair loss professionals test for hair disorders. Here is a list of the most common 4:

  1. Hair Pull Test
  2. Hair Count
  3. Biopsy
  4. Lab Tests

To learn more about any of these tests, visit this page on hair loss evaluation.

Hair Disorder Consultation in Miami

Don’t let a hair disorder compromise your sense of happiness with life. If you or a loved one is suffering with a hair disorder, our team has the experience and expertise to help. We hold every patient’s pursuit of a new head of hair in the highest regard, and we welcome you to contact our Institute to learn more about our approach to hair loss diagnosis and treatment.

Contact us online or call directly, (305) 925-0222.

PRP Therapy for Hair Loss

PRP Therapy for Hair LossPlatelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatments for hair loss are now available at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. This new method for hair restoration has demonstrated the potential to stimulate cellular activity deep with hair follicles, flooding them with the blood, oxygen, nutrients, platelets, and other natural growth factors needed to reduce inflammation and maximize the effectiveness of transplant procedures.

Treating Hair Loss with PRP

Treating hair loss with PRP begins with drawing a small amount of the patient’s own blood at the time of the procedure. Next, the natural healing and growth factors of the blood are enhanced through a special process that concentrates the platelets. This concentrated solution is then administered to both donor area and recipient area during the procedure.

When applied to the donor area, PRP seems to ward off inflammation, helping the area to heal more quickly and efficiently. There is some evidence that suggests PRP helps to reduce the appearance of post-operative scars (though some visibility is still apparent). Evidence also suggests PRP enriches the recipient area with the patient’s own natural growth factors, priming the scalp to support maximum hair growth following the transplant procedure.

At our Institute, we’ve seen exceptional results when treating patients with PRP during surgical hair restoration procedures. Below are a list of specific benefits that come with enhancing hair transplant procedures with PRP, as evidenced by patient results at our Institute.

Benefits of Using PRP During Hair Transplant

Based on years of application, our Institute has seen numerous benefits when enhancing hair transplant procedures with PRP injections. Based on the positive results achieved with past patients, we can say with confidence that this new method of hair transplantation has a high likelihood of delivering the following benefits to both men and women:

  1. Accelerated healing of donor area
  2. Faster healing of transplanted hair follicles
  3. Less post-operative redness, crusting, and agitation
  4. Increased growth rate of transplanted hair follicles
  5. Reducing swelling
  6. Faster post-operative healing

Though our Institute has not scientifically studied the efficacy of PRP when used in conjunction with hair transplant surgery, other scientists have produced evidence that supports the outcomes we’ve seen. Most notably is the following study, produced by a team from the International Hair Research Foundation and the University of Brescia, Italy.

Scientific Study: PRP Significantly Increases Hair Growth

According to evidence published in the British Journal of Dermatology, “PRP was found to increase hair growth significantly” in patients suffering with alopecia areata (i). These results were achieved through a randomized, double-blind study that compared patients treated with PRP with those treated with a placebo. Researchers also noted significant decreases in hair dystrophy (fragility), burning, and itching among patients who were given PRP treatment.

PRP Treatment in Miami

At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, we continually work to improve patient experience by offering only the safest and most effective hair loss technologies. From the ARTAS® precision-based robotics to PRP injections that improve patients’ transplant results, our team stands committed to delivering only the most advanced and well-researched hair loss treatments available.

To learn more about PRP-enhanced hair transplant procedures, we invite you to contact our Institute online or call our clinic directly at 877-443-9070. Readers may also visit this page on PRP Miami treatments.

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