Category: Hair Loss

5 Foods That Can Help You In The Battle Against Hair Loss

We may not be able to change our genes, but we do have a significant degree of control over our health and how our bodies function. While genetics play an oversized role in whether or not we experience hair loss, it isn’t the only game in town. Many other factors impact the health of our hair and our susceptibility to shedding. This includes the hormones and enzymes involved in hair growth and regeneration. When these aspects of our body chemistry are imbalanced, they can cause hair loss. Fortunately, changes in diet may be able to reduce the production of hair-damaging hormones and slow or prevent further hair loss.

DHT, Testosterone, and Hair Loss

Both hypothyroidism (too few thyroid hormones) and hyperthyroidism (too many) can contribute to hair loss through their impact on the production of a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT). A synthesized version of testosterone, DHT is a key hormone in sexual development and physical appearance. If the body converts too much testosterone into DHT, it disrupts the natural growth cycle of hair. In turn, this causes the hair follicles to shrink, ultimately resulting in thinning hair and shedding.

As such, decreasing DHT production from testosterone can reduce the damage to hair follicles that leads to hair loss. One way to do so is by blocking an enzyme called 5-alpha reductase which fuels the testosterone-into-DHT process.

Several foods may be able to decrease DHT production by blocking 5-alpha reductase and putting the brakes on the damage DHT does to hair. These include:

  • Green tea.  A plant compound called EGCG, abundant in green tea, may support hair growth by blocking DHT from damaging hair follicles.
  • Coconut oil. Some studies have shown that the lauric acid contained in coconut oil can block DHT production.
  • Onions. Quercetin is an antioxidant found in onions that has been shown to inhibit DHT production from testosterone by blocking the enzyme alpha-5 reductase.
  • Turmeric. In preclinical studies, this widely used herb may reduce DHT from testosterone by blocking alpha-5 reductase.
  • Edamame. These beans contain isoflavones and other compounds that may lower DHT levels and help fight hair loss.

Other foods that can help with hair health and growth include:

  • Nuts
  • Salmon and other fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids
  • Spinach and other leafy greens
  • Grapefruit
  • Lentils
  • Avocados
  • Sunflower seeds

Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

Of course, dietary improvements alone may not stop hair loss or restore your hair to the fullness it once had. At the Miami Hair Institute, our skilled physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases that can’t be reversed at home. We can help patients suffering from hair loss through advanced hair restoration surgery techniques and alternative non-invasive treatments.

To receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Psoriasis and Hair Loss

When there are problems with your scalp, it can cause problems for your hair. The skin on your scalp is the soil in which your hair follicles grow, so when that skin suffers, your hair will too, up to and including hair shedding and loss. One of the most common scalp conditions that can lead to hair loss is psoriasis.

Affecting around 7.4 million Americans, psoriasis arises when the body’s immune system causes skin cells to grow too rapidly. Those cells then build up into red, scaly patches called plaques. While psoriasis can appear anywhere on the body, about half of all cases are on the scalp. The condition

Intense Itchiness Leads To Destructive Scratching

While many scalp psoriasis cases are relatively mild with very light scaling, it can often be severe. The most painful and uncomfortable symptoms of scalp psoriasis, such as dry scalp, burning, soreness, and scaling, can be extremely itchy. The intense impulse to relieve that itchiness by scratching the scalp is the primary reason that psoriasis can lead to hair loss. Additionally, forcefully attempting to remove the scaling to relieve discomfort can also cause hair to fall out.

Since it is the response to psoriasis more than psoriasis itself that leads to hair loss, it is important to treat the condition in a way that is both effective and gentle.  Once scalp psoriasis is resolved with such treatment, any lost hair should grow back.

Hair-Safe Treatment For Psoriasis

To reduce scalp itching and the possibility of hair loss caused by constant scratching, try these approaches:

  • Use a moisturizing conditioner to keep your scalp from drying out.
  • Limit your use of blow dryers and other hot tools when styling your hair.
  • Try hair products containing menthol
  • Press a wet towel or ice pack against the irritated section of your scalp.

Additional treatments can involve the use of medicated shampoos, lotions, creams, gels, oils, foams, soaps, and ointments that contain either salicylic acid or coal tar. While some of these products are available over-the-counter, stronger ones require a prescription. 

Effective Hair Loss Treatments For Psoriasis And All Other Conditions

No matter what is causing your hair loss issues, the world-renowned hair restoration physicians at the Miami Hair Institute can help. Our surgeons, nurses, and staff represent the finest team in Miami and have effectively treated thousands of men and women using the most advanced surgical and non-surgical techniques. If you are ready to finally do something about your hair loss, we invite you to schedule a personalized hair loss evaluation at our South Florida clinic. Please contact us today at 305-925-0222.

Psychological Impact Of Hair Loss On Men and Women

Psychological Impact Of Hair Loss On Men and Women

There are plenty of visual signs of hair loss: a receding hairline, hair left in a brush, in the drain, on your pillow, a growing bald spot on the crown of your head. But not all of the impact of hair loss can be seen in the mirror. Losing your hair can have devastating emotional and psychological side effects.

While a full head of hair may no longer be necessary for our physical health and survival as it was for our ancient ancestors, it retains a symbolic power in our society and in cultures around the world. Hair conveys strength and well-being, while the lack of it is often perceived, unfairly, as a sign of early aging and less desirable qualities.

People experiencing hair loss often internalize these inaccurate and unjust perceptions, with a corresponding reduction in self-esteem and heightened anxiety over their “declining” appearance. In more extreme cases, people who are losing their hair can develop body dysmorphic disorder, suffer from ongoing depression, and endure a diminished quality of life. Some folks may be so embarrassed by their hair loss that they isolate themselves and avoid social situations, further accelerating an unnecessary spiral of loneliness and shame.

Hair Loss Is Especially Hard On Women

The psychological costs of hair loss take a toll on men and women alike. Unquestionably, however, hair loss can be even more devastating for females. While a bald man or one with a receding hairline may not raise an eyebrow, the same can’t be said for women even though they account for about 40 percent of all hair loss cases. Society’s expectations about female appearance and attractiveness have made hair loss a particularly traumatic condition for women, leading to a host of emotional issues.

These issues manifest themselves in relationships, careers, and physical health. Hair loss can take its toll through: 

  • Increased stress, grief, or unease during routine activities
  • Avoidance of new romantic relationships or withdrawal in existing ones
  • Overwhelming feelings of humiliation and embarrassment or humiliation
  • Jealousy or envy about those who don’t experience hair loss
  • Career-related obstacles, particularly for individuals in broadcasting or other appearance-focused positions
  • Shutting off from friends or family and missing out on important life events for fear of highlighting hair loss symptoms

Given the foregoing, vanity is not the reason that so many people seek help with their hair loss issues. Rather, individuals with hair loss who pursue hair restoration treatments are making a bold and courageous step to improve their quality of life and care for their own emotional and mental health.

Improving The Lives Of Men And Women Who Experience Hair Loss

At the Miami Hair Institute, we consider it a privilege to help our patients in their hair restoration journey.  Led by world-renowned hair transplant surgeons who have changed the lives of thousands of men and women, we evaluate each hair loss patient with a comprehensive and proven methodology to determine the cause of hair loss and choose the most effective treatment option.

To schedule your personalized hair loss evaluation, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Are COVID-19 Patients Experiencing Hair Loss?

Are COVID-19 Patients Experiencing Hair Loss?

With each passing month that the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, doctors and scientists continue to learn more about the devastating toll the virus takes on those who become infected. New symptoms and consequences of the coronavirus keep being discovered, including, it now seems, hair loss.

Hair loss is currently not listed on the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) official list of COVID-19 symptoms. However, recent surveys, along with substantial anecdotal evidence from physicians treating COVID patients, reveals that significant hair loss is not uncommon. For example, more than 27% of at least 1,100 poll respondents in the COVID-19 Survivor Corps Facebook group reported experiencing hair loss.

Experts believe that the stress, shock, and disruption caused by the virus, if not the virus itself, is causing many patients to experience a hair loss condition called telogen effluvium.

Telogen Effluvium Caused By COVID-19

Telogen effluvium is a temporary hair loss condition in which hair follicles are shocked into a resting state. Since the follicles stop actively producing more hair to replace normal shedding, the thinning tends to happen in a diffuse pattern throughout the scalp. If the factors causing the shedding can be addressed and resolved, the follicles often return to their normal healthy state and fully regrow without treatment or surgical intervention.

Many of the physical and psychological impacts of COVID-19, such as high fever, severe infection, illness, significant weight loss, physical trauma, and emotional stress, are precisely the kinds of disruptions that lead to telogen effluvium. Quarantines, worries about jobs and finances, juggling the responsibilities of parenting and career  – these common pandemic-related stressors alone are more than enough to cause hair loss, even for those who aren’t otherwise sick.

Spring Hair Shedding Makes Matters Worse

The timing of the pandemic’s arrival in the U.S. also may have made matters worse for those who may experience telogen effluvium. On average, we shed about 50 to 100 strands per day. However, spring brings with it a natural increase in hair loss, meaning that most folks will likely see closer to the high-end of 100 strands fall out per day. When combined with the shock loss brought about by COVID-19, this seasonal increase can further contribute to significant shedding.

As noted, hair loss caused by telogen effluvium is a temporary condition. As COVID-19 patients recover, those who lost hair while enduring the worst of the illness should ultimately see their hair return to normal.

The Miami Hair Institute Remains Committed To Helping Our Patients Through These Difficult Times

These are challenging and unprecedented times for all of us. At the Miami Hair Institute, we know how difficult and stressful things can be as we cope with the uncertainties and disruptions caused by COVID-19. If you are experiencing hair loss, that can make matters even more stressful. During this time, we remain committed to helping our clients address their hair loss issues safely and effectively through our advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Hair Loss vs. Hair Shedding

Hair Loss vs. Hair Shedding

When you walk out of your front door, that doesn’t mean you’re never coming back. Similarly, if you notice increasing amounts of hair stuck in your brush or the drain, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you are suffering from permanent hair loss. Not all hair that falls out never comes back. Sometimes, hair falling out – hair shedding – is a temporary phenomenon that is no cause for concern. Other times, however, it can indicate a chronic hair loss condition in which hair loss is permanent. Knowing the difference between hair shedding and hair loss can help determine what, if anything, you can and should do to address the issue.

Hair Shedding

As a preliminary matter, even folks who seemingly have full, robust heads of hair lose between 50 to 100 hairs a day on average. This amount of hair shedding is normal, expected, and part of the regular hair growth cycle. But physical changes, life events, and lifestyle choices can cause hair to shed at a significantly higher rate.

These issues can lead to a condition called telogen effluvium in which hair follicles are shocked into a resting state. Since the follicles stop actively producing more hair to replace normal shedding, the thinning tends to happen in a diffuse pattern throughout the scalp. If the factors causing the shedding can be addressed and resolved, the follicles often return to their normal healthy state and fully regrow without treatment or surgical intervention.

Common reasons for temporary hair shedding include:

  • Excessive stress
  • Extreme weight loss
  • Childbirth
  • Menopause
  • Hormonal imbalances
  • Prescription medication
  • Recent surgery
  • Stopping birth control pills

Hair Loss

As opposed to shedding, hair loss involves conditions that stop hair from growing entirely. By an overwhelming margin, pattern baldness – androgenetic alopecia – is the most common cause of hair loss. Over 95 percent of hair loss cases involve this hereditary hair loss condition that affects over three million Americans each year. Androgenetic alopecia causes hair miniaturization, a phenomenon in which follicles become thinner and finer each time they go through the hair growth cycle. Eventually, those follicles will die and fall out.

Another common cause of hair loss is alopecia areata, which is a hair loss condition that involves a direct assault on your hair follicles by your own immune system and white blood cells. This attack shrinks the follicles and subsequently slows down hair growth. In turn, this leads to sudden hair loss in quarter-sized patches that can progress across the scalp rapidly and unpredictably.

If you apply constant tension to your hair follicles, they will eventually experience damage, weaken, and ultimately die and fall out. This is called traction alopecia.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Treatments for Hair Loss During Menopause

Treatments for Hair Loss During Menopause

Along with hot flashes, mood swings, and other physical and emotional disruptions caused by wildly fluctuating hormones, hair loss can also be an unwelcome consequence of menopause. Making matters worse, the stress of losing or shedding hair can feed on itself and make menopausal hair loss even more prominent.

Fortunately, women can take steps to curb menopause-related hair loss. Many of the hair restoration treatments that we use at the Miami Hair & Skin Institute to treat pattern baldness and other types of hair loss are equally effective at addressing menopausal shedding and loss. It is one aspect of this life change that you can change yourself, and it would be our privilege to help.   

What’s Behind Menopausal Hair Loss?

The primary reason behind menopausal hair loss is that women going through it produce lower amounts of two hormones necessary for hair follicle health and growth – estrogen and progesterone. The decrease in these hormone levels slows down hair growth, and follicles become thin, brittle, and more vulnerable to damage.

While estrogen and progesterone levels plummet, levels of androgens increase. These hormones trigger follicle miniaturization on the scalp, which makes hair more prone to falling out.

Menopause’s hormonal fluctuations also contribute to other mental and emotional conditions and lifestyle changes, which themselves can cause hair loss. These can include:

  • Stress
  • Emotional decline due to diminished self-confidence
  • Lack of exercise
  • Imbalanced nutrition
  • Dehydration
  • Damaging hairstyles
  • Medication

Menopausal Hair Loss Treatments

Fortunately, menopausal hair loss is treatable. The physicians at the Miami Hair & Skin Institute understand how challenging this life change can be for women, particularly when it involves hair loss. We work with our female patients to proactively restore their hair and their self-esteem through early detection, comprehensive diagnosis, and optimal treatment and restoration approaches.

Treatment options include non-surgical hair restoration through the use of medications such as Minoxidil (available by the brand name Rogaine®), which has shown success in slowing or stopping hair loss in women.

Low-level laser therapy for hair (LLLT) is another non-surgical restoration method that can reduce hair loss and, in some cases, stimulate new hair growth in women. Safe, painless, FDA-approved lasers promote blood flow and nutrient delivery to the hair follicles, strengthening and encouraging follicle growth. Women are particularly fond of these “laser therapies for hair loss” because they are quick, convenient, safe, and effective.

Finally, women may elect to have hair transplant surgery, a procedure during which the patient’s own hair follicles are extracted from areas of healthy scalp and relocated to areas experiencing thinning or balding.

You Don’t Have to Live With Menopausal Hair Loss. The Miami Hair Institute Can Help.

Some of life’s changes may be inevitable and unavoidable. Menopausal hair loss is not one of them. Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance for women to restore their hair to its naturally full state. To learn more about how we can help and to schedule your personal hair loss evaluation, call the Miami Hair Institute today at 305.925.0222 to speak directly with a member of our team.

Psychological Impact Of Hair Loss On Men and Women

How Menopause Affects Hair Loss

Life is full of changes and transitions. For women, menopause can be one of the most taxing and impactful of these passages. Fluctuating hormone levels can lead to several unpleasant and undesirable effects – physically, psychologically, and emotionally.  These typically include hot flashes, mood swings, and irregular menstruation. For a lot of women, however, menopause may also cause hair shedding and loss. This can make menopause even more stressful, which in turn can make hair loss even more noticeable.

Why Does Menopause Cause Hair Loss?

Menopausal women produce lower amounts of two hormones necessary for hair follicle health and growth – estrogen and progesterone. As these hormone levels decrease, hair growth slows down and follicles become thin, brittle, and more prone to damage.

Making things worse, the downturn in hair-promoting hormone levels comes with a corresponding increase in androgens. These hormones trigger follicle miniaturization on the scalp, which makes hair more susceptible to falling out.

Menopause’s hormonal fluctuations also contribute to other mental and emotional conditions and lifestyle changes, which themselves can cause hair loss. These can include:

  • Stress
  • Emotional decline due to diminished self-confidence
  • Lack of exercise
  • Imbalanced nutrition
  • Dehydration
  • Damaging hairstyles
  • Medication

Menopausal Hair Loss Treatment

Fortunately, menopausal hair loss is treatable. The physicians at the Miami Hair & Skin Institute understand how exhausting and difficult this life change can be for women, particularly when it involves hair loss. We work with our female patients to proactively address their hair loss issues through early detection, professional diagnosis, and personally tailored treatment plans designed for optimal results.

These treatment options include:

  • Non-surgical hair restoration methods such as Minoxidil (Rogaine®), which has shown success in slowing or stopping hair loss in women.
  • Low-level laser therapy for hair (LLLT) can reduce hair loss and, in some cases, stimulate new hair growth in women.
  • Hair transplant surgery, a procedure during which the patient’s own hair follicles are extracted from areas of healthy scalp and relocated to areas experiencing thinning or balding.

Learn More About How The Miami Hair Institute Can Help With Menopausal Hair Loss

Early detection, diagnosis, and treatment provide the best chance for women to restore their hair to its naturally full state. To learn more about how we can help and to schedule your personal hair loss evaluation, call the Miami Hair Institute today at 305.925.0222 to speak directly with a member of our team.

Are COVID-19 Patients Experiencing Hair Loss?

How Ethnicity Can Affect Hair Loss

It is a lovely sentiment to believe that no matter the color of our skin or where our ancestors or we came from, we are all the same on the inside. While that may be true in many respects, it isn’t the case when it comes to hair loss. People from all ethnic backgrounds lose hair and develop pattern baldness, but not in the same way or to the same degree.

Different Patterns of Pattern Baldness

Most cases of hair loss are genetic, like androgenetic alopecia, also known as pattern baldness. There isn’t an ethnic group on earth that is immune to this condition. But genetic differences between ethnicities lead to individuals from different backgrounds losing their hair in different patterns.

For example, studies suggest that hair loss in men from Latin and Mediterranean backgrounds tends to start at the hairline and the crown of the head. For men with Semitic heritage, pattern baldness is more likely to begin at the hairline and keep moving back from there. Hair loss in men from Nordic countries often leaves a small tuft of hair at the center of the hairline while the hair loss happens around it.

Caucasians Lose The Most Hair

In terms of which ethnicity tends to experience the most hair loss, Caucasians are the undisputed leaders. That is why it is no surprise that countries with the most people suffering thinning hair were all European: the Czech Republic, Spain, Germany, France, and the United Kingdom lead the list, with the U.S. coming in sixth.

After Caucasians, people of Afro-Caribbean heritage tended to experience the next highest levels of hair loss, with Asian men having the lowest hair loss rates.

Unique Challenges for African-American Women

Although women from all ethnic backgrounds can and do struggle with hair loss, a unique combination of factors has led some experts to refer to hair loss in African-American women as an “epidemic.”

In 2016, a study specifically looking at the nature and extent of hair loss issues in African-American women found that 47.6% of survey respondents reported hair loss on the crown or top of their head, but 81.4% of those women had never seen a doctor about their hair loss issues.

The study identified a condition called central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) as the number one cause of hair loss in African-American women. CCCA causes hair follicles to become inflamed and destroyed, leaving behind scarring and permanent hair loss.

In addition to largely genetic conditions like CCCA and androgenetic alopecia, common ways that African-American women treat and style their hair can also contribute to hair loss.

Traction alopecia is a specific type of hair loss that occurs when a person applies tension to their hair for an extended period. Unfortunately, many of the hairstyles popular among African-American women involve that exact kind of tension. Techniques that make hair particularly vulnerable to traction alopecia include:

  • Braids
  • Ponytails
  • Cornrows
  • Buns
  • Weaves
  • Chemical hair relaxers

Hair Restoration Solutions For Everyone

No matter your background or the nature and extent of your hair loss issues, the world-renowned hair transplant surgeons at the Miami Hair Institute can help. We offer a wide range of innovative and effective surgical and non-surgical treatment options.

Schedule an appointment with the Miami Hair & Skin Institute today by calling 305.925.0222. We look forward to assisting you.

Can You Predict Hair Loss?

To see into the future, you often have to look at the past. That is certainly true when it comes to predicting whether you will experience hair loss. While genetics isn’t the only factor that will determine the likelihood of you losing your hair, the odds are pretty good that if your family history includes baldness, the same issue may be in store for you. Pattern baldness, also called androgenetic alopecia, is a hereditary hair loss condition responsible for 95% of hair loss cases.

But when you look around at your next family gathering (which will happen soon, hopefully) and you see a balding parent, grandparent, uncle, or aunt, does that necessarily mean you will suffer the same fate?

The truth is that not all relatives are created equal when trying to determine if you are genetically predisposed to pattern baldness.  For men, their maternal grandfather and their dad will be the ones who can give them an idea of what to expect from their hair as the years go by. 

Many of the genes responsible for baldness and hair loss tend to come from your maternal grandfather, even though genes from both of your parents and all of your grandparents can also play a role. If your maternal grandfather is bald or is losing their hair, you are a likely candidate for hair loss problems yourself.

The reason that a man’s mother’s father’s genes play an oversized role in predicting hair loss is that men only have one set of X chromosome genes, as opposed to two sets of autosomal genes. For the latter, men can have one set that causes baldness and one that doesn’t, giving them a moderate chance of losing their hair. However, since men only have that single set of x chromosome genes, which they share with their maternal grandfather, a baldness-related gene will be the only one around, and that means a much higher risk of developing androgenetic alopecia.

Call the Miami Hair Institute Today For Your Androgenetic Alopecia Evaluation

While looking at your genetic heritage will give you some clues as to what to expect will happen on your scalp over the years ahead, it is not definitive or a foregone conclusion. Researchers are still studying the interaction of various genetic and other factors that contribute to hair loss. But one thing we do know for sure: we now have plentiful options for addressing hair loss caused by androgenetic alopecia. Advancements in medicine, technology, and techniques have made hair restoration more available, more effective, and more convenient than ever before.

At the Miami Hair Institute, we pride ourselves on offering the most innovative approaches to hair restoration, and our surgeons are world-renowned experts in hair transplant surgery and other treatments.

Schedule an appointment with the Miami Hair Institute today by calling 305.925.0222.

prevent male pattern baldness

Types of Alopecia

Androgenetic alopecia – also called pattern baldness – is by far the most common cause of hair loss in men and women alike. But it is far from the only reason your hair may be thinning or falling out. Millions of Americans suffer from hair loss caused by other forms of alopecia every year. While each type of alopecia has its own causes and impacts, they all lead to the same disappointing and embarrassing issues inherent with losing your hair.

Here is what you need to know about some of the most common types of alopecia.

Androgenetic Alopecia

If your hair is thinning or falling out, the odds are pretty good that androgenetic alopecia is the culprit. Over 95% of hair loss cases are related to this hereditary hair loss condition that affects over three million Americans annually. Androgenetic alopecia causes hair miniaturization, where hair becomes thinner and finer each time it goes through the growth cycle. Eventually, these hairs cease to grow entirely and fall out.

Men are more likely to experience and notice androgenetic alopecia earlier than women, with 25 percent of American males seeing symptoms before age 21, approximately 66 percent of men showing some degree of loss by the age of 35, and 85 percent of men see significant thinning by age 50. Most women, however, do not notice or see any signs of thinning or balding hair until the age of 50 or 60.  

Alopecia Areata

This hair loss condition is caused by a direct attack on hair follicles by your own immune system and white blood cells. This assault causes the follicles to shrink and subsequently slow down hair production. In turn, this leads to sudden hair loss in quarter-sized patches which can progress across the scalp rapidly and unpredictably.

More extreme versions of the condition include alopecia totalis (Complete loss of hair on the scalp) and alopecia universalis (total loss of hair on the scalp and body). Hair follicles are not destroyed by alopecia areata and can typically regrow as soon as the inflammation dwindles.

Though not as common as androgenetic alopecia, which is the culprit in the vast majority of male pattern baldness cases, alopecia areata still affects two percent of Americans or roughly 6.8 million people. Unlike hereditary hair loss, which generally manifests later in life, alopecia areata typically occurs before the age of 30 and can sometimes be seen in children as young as two years old.

Researchers haven’t yet figured out the specific reason why the immune system would suddenly turn on hair follicles. However, there appears to be a strong genetic connection. Several studies have found that alopecia areata is far more common (1 out of 5) in people who have a close family member with the condition.

Traction Alopecia

If you apply constant tension to your hair follicles, they will eventually experience damage, weaken, and ultimately die and fall out. This is called traction alopecia.

The five primary causes of traction alopecia are:

  1. Wearing unnecessarily tight pigtails, ponytails, or braids for extended periods.
  2. Trichotillomania, a psychological disorder characterized by constant (and often unconscious) hair twisting, plucking, or pulling.
  3. Hairstyles that require hair to be tightly wound for a prolonged period.
  4. Hairpieces and weaves that must be affixed/clipped to the hair.
  5. Helmets, particularly compression-helmets like those worn while playing football, snowboarding, skiing, horseback riding, etc.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

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