Category: Hair Loss
Help, My Hair is Thinning! What Should I Do?

Help, My Hair is Thinning! What Should I Do?

It can be a jarring moment that can quickly become an ongoing and serious concern. You start to notice an unusual amount of hair in your shower drain, or on your pillow, or on your hairbrush. Then the same thing happens the next day, and the day after that, and the day after that. You look in the mirror and see the impact in areas of your scalp that have less hair than they used to. You know that it’s normal to lose about 50-100 hairs each day, but this is clearly more than that.

Your hair is thinning, suddenly, and for reasons you can’t figure out. You want to know why this is happening and what you can do about it, starting right now. Instead of wallowing in worry and self-pity, starting taking action to address your hair loss; one way or another, there are almost always things that you and a hair restoration physician can do to fix the problem or at least slow down your hair loss.

Consider taking some or all of these steps after you discover that your hair is thinning:

  • Schedule an evaluation with a hair restoration physician. You can’t fix a problem without first knowing what the problem is. Hair loss can occur for several different reasons, such as genetics, hormone imbalances, diet deficiencies, reactions to medications, or autoimmune conditions. Understanding the why behind your thinning hair is the first step in determining how to remedy the situation. Only a professional can get you the definitive answers you need.
  • Stop smoking. Smoking limits blood flow in your body and reduces the amount of essential nutrients that go to your hair follicles. Without a sufficient supply of those nutrients, your follicles will grow weak instead of just growing and will ultimately fall out.  
  • Get enough sleep. Getting sufficient rest sleep is critical for our health overall, as we expend enormous amounts of energy each day and our bodies need the time to recharge so they can function like they are supposed to. A lack of quality sleep prevents our bodies from repairing and regenerating hair follicles. This causes hair to stop growing, weaken, and eventually fall out more than it otherwise would. Even hair that doesn’t fall out will noticeably suffer, losing volume and shine.
  • Manage your stress. Overproduction of stress hormones contributes to adrenal fatigue, which occurs when the body produces too much cortisol. This excessive production of cortisol leads to a corresponding underproduction of hormones like androgens and aldosterone. Since we need these hormones for healthy hair growth, an insufficient supply will cause thinning or balding hair. Find methods to alleviate day-to-day stress that work best for you.
  • Stop wearing destructive hairstyles. Some hair loss issues are caused by the way we style, treat, and wear our hair. Tight ponytails, braids, or pigtails can lead to a condition called traction alopecia. Constant and severe tension on hair follicles because of such hairstyles will damage and weaken those follicles and eventually kill them, causing them to fall out. Avoid these styling habits and avoid hairstyles that require hair to be tightly wound for a prolonged period or hairpieces and weaves that must be affixed or clipped to the hair.
  • Get more vitamin D. Research suggests that vitamin D, along with the receptors in the skin that bind to the nutrient, plays a significant role in promoting healthy follicles and hair growth. In contrast, a lack of the vitamin may lead directly to hair loss. A 2014 study published in Molecular Endocrinology found that hair regrew in mice two weeks after introducing vitamin D receptors. Other studies also have made the connection between hair loss and vitamin D.
  • Increase your iron intake. As with vitamin D, an insufficient amount of iron is one of the more common causes of dietary-related hair loss. Low iron levels limit proper blood flow – something hair follicles need to receive and absorb growth-stimulating nutrients.
  • Use conditioner. If you don’t regularly use conditioner, your hair can become dehydrated, brittle, and damaged. Try incorporating a lightweight conditioner into your hair care routine to help moisturize your hair and keep it strong.

Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

As noted, the first thing you should do after noticing thinning hair is to reach out to a physician who can help you determine the cause and develop the solution for your condition. At the Hair Institute of Miami, we evaluate each hair loss patient with a comprehensive and proven methodology, obtaining a detailed medical history, performing an in-depth scalp examination using state-of-the-art diagnostic tools and, if indicated, blood tests to detect any underlying imbalances or deficiencies that may be contributing to the hair loss problem. With this information, we can determine the cause of hair loss and the most effective treatment option.

To schedule your personalized hair loss evaluation, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Why is My Hair Falling Out?

Why is My Hair Falling Out?

If you start noticing more hair in your shower drain or on your hairbrush, it can be a cause for concern. If you look in the mirror and see a hairline that keeps moving farther back, you may feel upset or worried. If you feel bare patches on your scalp or areas where hairs suddenly seem few and far between, it can be easy to start freaking out and ask yourself in dismay, “Why is my hair falling out???”   

It is not only an understandable question, but an important one. That’s because understanding the “why” behind your hair loss is the first step in doing something about it. At the Miami Hair Institute, every patient’s hair restoration journey begins with determining the reason behind their hair loss through a thorough, holistic evaluation. Knowing the cause of your hair loss allows us to develop and implement a course of treatment best suited to addressing your condition and restoring your hair to its full, robust appearance.

If your hair is thinning or falling out, there is a good chance it is for one of the following common reasons for hair loss:  

Genetics

By an overwhelming margin, androgenetic alopecia – pattern baldness –  is the most common cause of hair loss in men and women alike. This hereditary hair loss condition is the culprit behind over 95 percent of hair loss cases, affecting over 80 million Americans every year. Androgenetic alopecia causes hair miniaturization, a phenomenon in which hair follicles become finer and thinner each time they go through the hair growth cycle. Eventually, those follicles die and fall out.

Immune System Issues

Sometimes, the immune system doesn’t work as it is supposed to and winds up attacking the body’s normal functioning, including the hair growth cycle. Alopecia areata is a hair loss condition that involves just such an assault on hair follicles by the immune system and white blood cells. This attack shrinks the follicles and subsequently slows down hair growth. In turn, this leads to sudden hair loss in quarter-sized patches that can progress across the scalp quickly and unpredictably.

More extreme cases of alopecia areata include alopecia totalis (Complete loss of hair on the scalp) and alopecia universalis (total loss of hair on the scalp and body). Hair follicles are not destroyed by alopecia areata and can typically regrow as soon as the inflammation caused by the condition recedes.

Though not as common as androgenetic alopecia, alopecia areata still affects two percent of Americans or roughly 6.8 million people.

Damaging Hairstyles

Your hair follicles may be strong, but they’re not indestructible. If you apply constant tension and stress to them, they will eventually experience damage, weaken, and ultimately die and fall out. This condition is called traction alopecia.

The primary causes of traction alopecia all relate to how hair is styled, treated, or worn and include:

  1. Wearing unnecessarily tight pigtails, ponytails, or braids for extended periods.
  2. Trichotillomania, a psychological disorder characterized by constant (and often unconscious) hair twisting, plucking, or pulling.
  3. Hairstyles that require hair to be tightly wound for a prolonged period.
  4. Hairpieces and weaves that must be affixed/clipped to the hair.
  5. Helmets, particularly compression helmets like those worn while playing football, snowboarding, skiing, horseback riding, etc.

Your Lifestyle

Stress, a traumatic event, or a lack of sufficient sleep cause changes to our body chemistry that can have a range of adverse health effects, including damage to our hair follicles that can lead to thinning or hair loss. Fortunately, such “shock loss” is almost always a temporary phenomenon.

Hormonal Imbalances

Hormone imbalances are a common contributor to hair loss. Several hormones can impact the growth, strength, and health of our hair. The most frequent problems with hormone imbalances that can contribute to hair loss and shedding include thyroid imbalances such as hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism and the dramatic hormonal changes that accompany menopause and pregnancy.

No Matter Why You’re Losing Your Hair, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

Our world-renowned hair restoration physicians at the Miami Hair Institute diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Does Electromagnetic Radiation From Cell Phones Contribute To Hair Loss?

Our cell phones are a constant presence in our lives. We keep them in our pockets and by our sides almost all the time. As cell phones became ubiquitous over the past quarter-century, many people expressed concerns about whether and how the electromagnetic radiation they emit affects our health. While studies have made clear that there is no link between cell phone use and cancer or other serious conditions, some evidence has emerged, suggesting that prolonged cell phone use may contribute to hair loss.

While not definitive, the 2016 study “Hair Loss Due to Electromagnetic Radiation From Overuse of Cell Phone” published in the Journal of Cosmetology and Trichology concluded that “exposure to cell phone radiation can lead to hair loss” through three different impacts on the body.

Specifically, the researchers looked at the case of a 46-year-old male patient who had an unusual area of hair loss around his left ear. His hair surrounding this area was fragile, but could not be pulled out easily. Thinner, slow-growing hair was also seen on the base of the scalp. The findings of a biopsy indicated “prolonged exposure to an irritant or antigen” but did not indicate typical hair loss conditions such as alopecia areata or androgenetic alopecia.

The study considered previous research on the subject of cell phone use and hair loss and concluded that the radiation emitted from phones could lead to hair loss by:

  • DNA breakage. Subjects tested immediately before and immediately after extended periods of cell phone use showed an increase in DNA single-strand breaks in human hair root cells located around the ear where they held the phone.
  • Genotoxic and hormonal effects of mobile phone radiation. Cell phones impact the circadian patterns of gonadal, adrenal, and pituitary hormones, elevate estrogen, and reduce testosterone. All of these have a negative impact on the hair growth cycle. In addition to causing hair loss, mobile phone radiation can create hormonal imbalance, disturb hair growth regulation, and affect other systems in the body leading to secondary hair loss.

The good news is that the researchers were able to effectively treat the hair loss through the “use of antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, which can aid in the recovery of the damaged cells.” Additionally, “low dose 2% minoxidil application combined with low dose comprehensive nutritional therapy, limiting mobile phone usage and keeping the mobile phone instrument away from the ear, helps in complete regrowth of the hair.”

Again, this research is not conclusive, so there is no reason to throw your phone out the window. But if you do notice unusual hair loss patterns on your scalp near where you usually hold your phone, you should consult with a hair restoration physician.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

Our world-renowned hair restoration physicians at the Miami Hair Institute diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

New Study Sheds Light On Link Between Stress and Hair Loss

New Study Sheds Light On Link Between Stress and Hair Loss

Scientists, researchers, and doctors have known for quite some time that chronic stress can lead to hair shedding and loss. Now, researchers from Harvard University have made a key discovery about the biological mechanics that connect stress and hair loss.

Recently published in the journal Nature, the study found that a major stress hormone in mice puts their hair follicle stem cells into an extended resting phase without regenerating the follicle or the hair. Hair follicle stem cells are what fuel that natural cycle between rest and growth. During the hair growth phase, hair follicle stem cells become activated to regenerate the follicle and hair, and hairs grow longer every day. These stem cells are dormant during the resting phase, causing hairs to shed more easily and frequently. That shedding becomes hair loss when the stem cells remain dormant without regenerating new tissue.

The Harvard researchers identified the specific cell type and molecule responsible for relaying the stress signal to the stem cells. They found that the overproduction of certain hormones triggered by stress had a negative effect on hair follicles and their growth cycle.

Corticosterone is a primary stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands in mice. The human equivalent of corticosterone is cortisol, often called the “stress hormone.” The researchers found that giving mice corticosterone reproduced the stress effect on the stem cells, suggesting that elevated stress hormones indeed negatively affect hair follicle stem cells.  

Normally, time and aging slow down hair follicle regeneration over time, and the resting phase lasts longer. But when the researchers took the stress hormones out of the equation, the stem cells’ resting phase in the subject mice became significantly shorter. Their hair follicles constantly entered the growth phase and regenerated hair follicles throughout their life, even when they were much older.

The study confirms that reducing stress, thereby reducing the amount of cortisol we produce, can have a positive effect on hair loss. That is because stress keeps follicle stem cells from entering the growth phase and regenerating new hair follicles.

Of course, hair loss isn’t the only negative effect that too much stress has on our bodies. It can cause a whole host of health problems and diminish the quality of life. That is why self-care, including effective stress management, is so critical to our physical and mental health. Make sure that you identify a stress-reducing outlet that works for you, whether it is hanging out with friends, being alone with a book, walking your dog, or doing nothing at all.

No Matter Why You Are Losing Your Hair, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

Our world-renowned hair restoration physicians at the Miami Hair Institute diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

New Studies: Melatonin Cream Shown to Stimulate Hair Follicles

New Studies: Melatonin Cream Shown to Stimulate Hair Follicles

If you’ve heard of melatonin, it is likely in the context of getting a good night’s sleep. That’s because melatonin is a hormone that plays a critical role in our daily cycle of sleeping and wakefulness. An increasing number of people are taking melatonin supplements to help them if they have chronic insomnia or experience other disruptions to their sleep cycle, such as jet lag or shift work. But recent research suggests that melatonin not only can help you get the rest you need, but it can help you keep the hair you want if you are experiencing hair loss issues.

review recently published in the International Journal of Trichology looked at melatonin’s impact on hair loss. It concluded that topical melatonin solutions might provide effective treatment for hair loss caused by androgenetic alopecia, the most common condition that causes hair to fall out.  

The researchers compiled the results of five separate studies of melatonin and hair loss. One of the studies – involving 30 men and women – showed a significant reduction in the degree of severity of androgenetic alopecia after using melatonin for 30 and 90 days. Another study that involved 60 men and women suffering from hair loss found a significant reduction in hair loss among female participants, with less of an impact on men. In yet another study, researchers concluded that a melatonin solution applied to the scalps of 40 women with hair loss increased hair growth significantly compared to participants who were given a placebo.

While it is unclear how exactly melatonin may encourage hair growth, some experts suggest that it may have to do with the same circadian rhythms that govern the sleep-wake cycle. The hair growth cycle in humans is also under circadian control, which may account for the connection.

The authors of the review wrote that “Since safety and tolerability in all of the studies was good, the topical application of a cosmetic melatonin solution can be considered as a treatment option in androgenetic alopecia.”

Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

While melatonin may have a role to play in strengthening and keeping hair, research is still preliminary, and it may not by itself be able to reverse hair loss or stop it completely in its tracks. At the Miami Hair Institute, our skilled physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases that can’t be reversed at home. We can help patients suffering from hair loss through advanced hair restoration surgery techniques and alternative non-invasive treatments.

To receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

How The Pandemic Is Causing Hair Loss

How the Pandemic is Causing Hair Loss

We are a year into the COVID-19 pandemic. We are a year into lockdowns, school closures, social distancing, and endless Zoom meetings. We are a year into the economic fallout caused by the pandemic, and we are a year into constantly worrying about our health and that of our loved ones, many of whom we haven’t seen since this all began. Oh, and during that time, we had months of social unrest, a contentious election, and an attempted insurrection.

That is a lot to deal with over a long, long time – and it is taking its toll. Experts have seen significant increases in anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and, unsurprisingly, chronic stress. In turn, this is causing unwelcome yet predictable consequences, even in people who remain otherwise healthy and manage to steer clear of the virus. One of those consequences is hair loss.

Hair Loss Is A Symptom of COVID-19

For those who get sick with COVID-19, hair loss is a frequent phenomenon. As recently reported in the New York Times, hair loss has become a common symptom of the recovery process, usually occurring three to four months after a patient gets infected but sometimes happening sooner. 

Post-viral inflammation from the coronavirus, and the fever and severe stress it causes the body as it tries to fight back, can cause a temporary hair loss condition called telogen effluvium. This condition pushes more hair follicles than usual into the shedding phase of the hair growth life cycle.

Stress-Related Hair Loss Due To The Pandemic

But even people who don’t get sick from COVID-19 are experiencing telogen effluvium due to the constant stress, anxiety, and pressures caused by the pandemic. As a story by NPR summarized it: “a growing catalog of research shows that high levels of stress over an extended period of time can drastically alter physical function and affect nearly every organ system.”

Whether caused by COVID or other factors, stress has a clear connection to hair shedding and loss. Overproduction of stress hormones can promote adrenal fatigue, which occurs when the body produces too much cortisol and underproduces other necessary hormones like aldosterone and androgens, resulting in thinning or balding hair. 

Stress can also lead to hair loss because it often keeps people from sleeping as much as they need to. Insufficient sleep causes hair to stop growing, weaken, and eventually fall out more than it otherwise would. Even hair that doesn’t fall out will noticeably suffer, losing shine and volume.

If the times we live in are causing you undue stress, find a stress-reducing outlet.  Exercise, meditation, or yoga can help relieve some of the mental anguish that stress causes. But do whatever works for you, whether being with friends (safely), being alone with a book, walking your dog, or doing nothing at all.

The Miami Hair Institute Is Committed To Helping Our Patients Through These Difficult Times

These have been challenging times for all of us. At the Miami Hair Institute, we know how difficult and stressful things can be as we cope with the ongoing uncertainties and disruptions caused by COVID-19. If you are experiencing hair loss, that can make matters even more stressful. We remain committed to helping our clients address their hair loss issues safely and effectively.   To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

4 Reasons Behind Female Hair Loss

4 Reasons Behind Female Hair Loss

For decades, stand-up comedians have joked about the many differences between men and women. But it’s doubtful that they would get any laughs if they started riffing about female hair loss. While many cases of hair loss in women arise for the same reasons they do in men, such as stress or genetic predisposition, the distinct nature of female biology and life changes are behind a significant proportion of female hair loss problems.

While you will need a professional diagnosis by a hair restoration physician to determine the exact cause of your hair loss, it is likely that if you are noticing an increase in hair shedding or thinning areas on your scalp, it is due to one of these common reasons behind female hair loss:

Menopause

Women going through menopause produce lower levels of estrogen and progesterone – two hormones critical for hair growth and follicle health. As these hormone levels decrease, hair growth slows while follicles become thin, brittle, and more vulnerable to damage.

Making matters worse, the decrease in hair-promoting hormones is accompanied by an increase in androgens – hormones that trigger follicle miniaturization on the scalp. This makes hair more susceptible to falling out.

The hormonal fluctuations of menopause also contribute to other mental and emotional conditions and lifestyle changes, which themselves can cause hair loss. These can include:

  • Stress
  • Emotional decline due to diminished self-confidence
  • Lack of exercise
  • Imbalanced nutrition
  • Dehydration
  • Damaging hairstyles
  • Medication

Pregnancy

Pregnancy causes wild fluctuations in hormones, as every mom knows. But these hormonal upheavals don’t end after delivery. The months that follow childbirth also see dramatic changes in hormone levels as the body works its way back to its normal state. This hormonal whiplash can take a toll on hair as well. 

Many women notice that their hair seems thicker and fuller during pregnancy than it did beforehand. This is because of elevated estrogen levels that increase the percentage of hairs in the growth cycle while simultaneously freezing hair in the resting phase of hair growth. After pregnancy, estrogen levels fall dramatically, and all the hair that was growing so impressively starts to fall out. While we all shed hair regularly, at a rate of around 80 hairs per day, the extent of postpartum shedding can raise that number to closer to 400 hairs a day.

The good news is that this type of hair loss is almost always temporary, and hair growth will return to normal in short order.

Traction Alopecia

If you apply constant tension to your hair follicles, you will damage, weaken, and ultimately kill them. This is called traction alopecia, and it affects women who wear certain types of hairstyles or engage in other destructive habits.

The five primary causes of traction alopecia are:

  1. Wearing unnecessarily tight ponytails, pigtails, or braids for extended periods.
  2. Trichotillomania, a psychological condition characterized by constant (and often unconscious) hair twisting, pulling, or plucking.
  3. Hairstyles in which hair is tightly wound for a prolonged period.
  4. Hairpieces and weaves that are affixed/clipped to the hair.

Anemia

Anemia involves an insufficient amount of iron in the blood and is one of the most common causes of dietary-related hair loss in women. Low iron levels restrict proper blood flow and reduce the amount of growth-stimulating nutrients that hair follicles need. Changes in diet and iron supplements can help, including eating foods such as spinach, kale, broccoli, and other leafy greens.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Weight Loss and Hair Loss: Is There A Connection?

Weight Loss and Hair Loss: Is There A Connection?

No good deed goes unpunished, so the saying goes. For many people, the good deed of getting in shape and losing excess weight can come with the unexpected and unwelcome punishment of hair loss. Fortunately, hair loss that is associated with weight loss is neither inevitable nor permanent.

Not All Weight Loss Is Created Equal

Putting aside gradual weight loss that comes from a healthy diet and exercise, rapid weight loss caused by illness, stress, or unhealthy crash diets is clinically associated with hair loss. Stress-induced hair loss, also known as telogen effluvium (TE), often happens in tandem with stress-induced weight loss.

But even controlled, healthy, and intentional weight loss can lead to hair loss if the modified diet adopted to shed pounds lacks the nutrients necessary to prevent hair from shedding.

Many dieters fail to get enough protein when they lose weight. This is a big problem for hair health. Protein and the amino acids they contain are essential for hair growth. But sufficient protein intake is also critical for a host of other crucial bodily functions. When the body doesn’t get enough protein, it essentially has to ration how to distribute the little it has. And it will inevitably decide to direct that protein to functions and organs far more critical to survival than hair follicles. Deprived of needed protein, hair becomes more brittle and susceptible to damage, and therefore more likely to fall out.

Make Sure Your Diet Includes Enough Protein

Losing weight and getting enough protein are not mutually exclusive. There are plenty of healthy diets that incorporate protein-rich foods like eggs, fish, and beef. For those who eat a vegan diet, great plant-based sources of protein include:

  • Quinoa
  • Tofu and soy products
  • Chickpeas
  • Chia seeds
  • Lentils
  • Walnuts
  • Almonds
  • Cashews
  • Beans

If you notice that you are losing more hair than usual while dieting, the good news is that it is usually a temporary phenomenon. By ensuring that you get the necessary nutrients that can keep your hair healthy, you can lose unwanted weight while keeping your very-much-wanted hair.

Call The Miami Hair Institute Today To Discuss Your Hair Loss Questions and Concerns

Of course, dietary improvements alone may not stop hair loss or restore your hair to the fullness it once had. At the Miami Hair Institute, our skilled physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases that can’t be reversed at home. We can help patients suffering from hair loss through advanced hair restoration surgery techniques and alternative non-invasive treatments.

To receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

The Pandemic Has Changed The Way We Care For Our Hair

The Pandemic Has Changed The Way We Care For Our Hair

After almost a year of living with the pandemic, we understand that the impact of  COVID-19 extends far beyond those who actually get sick with the virus. We have all changed the way we live, the way we do our jobs, and the way we care for ourselves. This includes how we are treating our hair.

It has been established that hair loss is one of the many unfortunate consequences of COVID-19 infection. Even for otherwise healthy individuals, the stress of our current circumstances has led to an increase in cases of sudden stress-related hair loss. As reported by NPR, one dermatologist at the Cleveland Clinic who used to see about five patients a week with stress-related hair loss and now sees between 20 to 25.

But hair loss is not the only way that the pandemic had changed the health of our hair. Lockdowns and quarantines and working from home have led many people to dramatically alter their hair care regimes. People who don’t go into the office every day or aren’t heading out for nights on the town are not shampooing their hair as often as they used to, nor are they using as much product. Shuttered hair salons kept people from getting their hair cut or styled, and even when they are allowed to reopen, many folks decide that it is not yet worth the risk.

While folks may be taking a more laissez-faire approach to their hair because of convenience or safety concerns, one unintended result is that their hair may be better off for it. 

Shampooing every day can open and close hair cuticles so much that it breaks, which leads to split ends and breakage, especially when combined with styling or heating products. People who have reduced the frequency of shampooing or who have switched to dry shampoos are seeing stronger, healthier-looking hair. So too are those who are giving their hair a break from gels, sprays, curling irons, or blow dryers.

The pandemic will be behind us, hopefully soon. While we will be happy to say goodbye to face masks, social distancing, and quarantines, we may want to continue the gentler approach to hair care that many of us adopted during our COVID-19 days.

The Miami Hair Institute Is Here For You During These Trying Times

At the Miami Hair Institute, we know how difficult and stressful things can be as we cope with the uncertainties and disruptions caused by COVID-19. During this time, we remain committed to helping our clients address their hair loss issues safely and effectively through our advanced hair restoration techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments. To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Hair Loss After Surgery: Why Does It Happen and What Can You Do?

Hair Loss After Surgery: Why Does It Happen and What Can You Do?

Most invasive surgeries, as necessary as they may be, aren’t easy on the body. The trauma of surgery is why we need sedation and anesthesia during procedures and why it takes days or weeks to recover. After surgery, the disruption to the body’s normal functioning can linger and manifest itself in many ways, including temporary hair loss.

Causes of Post-Surgical Hair Loss

Post-surgical hair loss is a common phenomenon and is a form of telogen effluvium (TE), a condition caused by disruptions to the hair follicle growth cycle.

In a normal hair growth cycle, follicles go through a process that lasts for several years at a time. Hair follicles don’t continuously produce new hairs. Instead, follicles cycle through resting phases known as telogens.

The American Hair Loss Association estimates that 10 to 20 percent of hair follicles are in a telogen state at any given time. But if the proportion of telogen hairs rises above 20 percent, it is often an indication of telogen effluvium.

The stress caused by surgery can sometimes put hair follicles in a more prolonged resting state than usual. Like psychological and emotional stress, that caused by surgery can lead directly to hair loss.  This is because stress may cause the body to divert essential hair growth nutrients such as biotin, iron, zinc, protein away from vital organs, which in turn can cause hair thinning and TE.

Another hair loss condition can arise in particularly lengthy surgeries when the patient’s head remains in one position for hours at a time. Positional alopecia occurs when blood flow to hair follicles is cut off because of the pressure put on part of the scalp. Research has found that positional alopecia is most common in cardiac surgeries and extensive reconstructive surgeries.

While all surgical procedures have the potential to cause telogen effluvium and hair loss, procedures that involve incisions on the scalp, such as head and neck surgeries, may also increase the risk of hair follicles shutting down.

Minimizing Post-Surgical Hair Loss

As noted, post-surgical hair loss is almost always a temporary phenomenon. But while you may not be able to prevent telogen effluvium entirely, you can minimize the severity of hair loss after surgery by eating a nutritious diet, getting sufficient sleep and exercise, and managing your stress levels.

You can also discuss your concerns with a hair restoration physician who may have additional suggestions about how you can reduce hair loss after your procedure.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

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