Category: Hair Facts
Male Pattern Baldness Linked to Increased COVID-19 Risks

Male Pattern Baldness Linked to Increased COVID-19 Risks

Are men who suffer from male pattern baldness more at risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms and more likely to die from the virus? Unlikely as it may seem for there to be a connection between the two conditions, researchers recently noticed a higher incidence of coronavirus-related deaths in bald men than those who do not experience hair loss.

As reported in London’s The Telegraph, scientists suspect that the link between COVID-19 fatalities and hair loss is found in androgens, male sex hormones that are cousins of other similar hormones such as testosterone. Androgens trigger follicle miniaturization and make hair more likely to fall out. But androgens may also increase the ability of the virus to attack cells in the body, increasing the likelihood that symptoms will be severe.

“We really think that baldness is a perfect predictor of severity,” said Carlos Wambier, a Brown University professor who had conducted studies on the subject, as quoted in the Telegraph article.

Wambier conducted a small study in Spain that found that bald men accounted for 79% of all males with coronavirus admitted to three Madrid hospitals. Another study involving prostate cancer in Italy found that patients who received androgen-deprivation therapy were only a quarter as likely to contract COVID-19 as men receiving other cancer treatments.

Statistics since the dawn of the pandemic show that men generally are 2.5 times more likely to die from COVID-19 than women. Pattern baldness may be a big reason behind the disparity.

This has lead researchers to consider the enticing possibility that anti-baldness treatments that focus on lowering androgen levels could also be helpful in slowing down the virus in men who become infected, giving their bodies more time to fight and recover. Studies are already underway to explore the potential efficacy of these treatments, though they are in their earliest stages.

The Miami Hair Institute Remains Committed To Helping Our Patients Through These Difficult Times

These are challenging and unprecedented times for all of us. At the Miami Hair Institute, we know how difficult and stressful things can be as we cope with the uncertainties and disruptions caused by COVID-19. If you are experiencing hair loss, that can make matters even more stressful. During this time, we remain committed to helping our clients address their hair loss issues safely and effectively through our advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments. To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Common Scalp Problems: How To Treat Them

Common Scalp Problems: How To Treat Them

Hair loss is, in its simplest sense, a scalp problem. Whether you suffer from genetics-related pattern baldness or you are losing your hair due to other factors, the health of your scalp plays a direct role in the health of your hair. But hair loss is just one of many ways that your scalp can cause you discomfort, embarrassment, or grief.

Tens of millions of Americans deal with a variety of scalp problems and spend hundreds of millions of dollars trying to resolve these issues. Here are some of the most common scalp problems we see at the Miami Hair & Skin Insititute, along with ways you can effectively treat them, usually on your own.

Dandruff

Dandruff may be annoying or embarrassing, but it is not usually a cause for worry or a sign of something more serious. This condition is simply a visible sign that the skin cells on your scalp are producing new cells faster than is typical. This results in excessive shedding of dead skin cells, which then fall from the scalp as dandruff flakes.

While there is no “cure” for the condition, you can keep dandruff under control with over-the-counter medicated shampoos like Head & Shoulders or Selsun Blue. If OTC remedies fail to do the trick, you may need prescription anti-dandruff shampoo.

Seborrheic Dermatitis

A mild form of dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis can cause a reddening of the scalp and the production of a lot of oil. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, the condition is more common in individuals with oily skin or hair, acne, or psoriasis. As with dandruff, attempt OTC shampoos to alleviate the problem and see a doctor for a prescription shampoo if it persists.

Psoriasis

While psoriasis can develop anywhere on the skin, it most often shows up on the scalp when the body makes too many new skin cells. Those cells can build up and form thick, itchy, crusted scales.

Steroid creams or ointments are usually effective at treating scalp psoriasis, as are shampoos containing tar or salicylic acid. Severe cases may need prescription oral or injectable medication.

Folliculitis

Folliculitis, which appears as small pus-filled pimples on the scalp, is a condition involving inflammation or infection of hair follicles. It is usually caused by bacteria that make their way into the follicles from an infection nearby. You can also irritate the follicles when shaving or using makeup, or by certain fabrics in clothing.

While some mild cases clear up without treatment, an antibiotic can take care of the issue quickly.

Scalp Sunburn

Balding individuals or those with thinning hair are particularly vulnerable to sunburn on the scalp. Too much sun can turn your hair brittle, dry, and more prone to breaks and splits. Additionally, sunburn on the scalp can not only be the result of having areas of thinning or absent hair, but it can also cause hair loss, at least temporarily. Protect your scalp with scalp sunscreen or a hat, especially in the summer.

Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

If you are concerned about your hair loss and are ready to do something about it, we invite you to schedule a hair loss evaluation at the Miami Hair Institute. Drs. Nusbaum and Rose are internationally acclaimed hair restoration surgeons with more than 40 years of combined experience. To receive a personalized evaluation and hair restoration plan, contact us online or call our office at 305-925-0222.

5 Follicular Facts You Should Know

5 Follicular Facts You Need To Know

For all the time you spend looking at, caring for, or worrying about your hair, how much do you really know about what’s going on up there? Do you know what your hair is made of, how it grows, or why you may be losing yours?

At the Miami Hair Institute, we believe in empowering our patients with knowledge about their hair, hair loss, and hair restoration options. To that end, here are five follicular facts you need to know.

  1. Each human hair has three separate parts:
    1. The shaft. The shaft is the part of the hair you can see above the surface of your scalp. Each shaft has three layers. The innermost layer, the medulla, doesn’t serve any particular purpose. However, the second layer, called the cortex, provides hair with strength, durability, and the ability to uptake water. The outer layer is the cuticle, which protects the shaft and helps it repel water. 
    1. The follicle. Sitting just below the surface of the skin, this tube-like pouch anchors the shaft and attaches it to the skin.
    1. The hair root. The hair root attaches hair to the base of the follicle. The root is where hair grows and is nourished by blood capillaries.
  • The hair growth cycle has three distinct phases:
    • Anagen phase. The first phase is the growing stage. Hair grows at about one cm each month, and the anagen phase can last between two and five years.
    • Catagen phase.  As this phase begins, the bulb detaches from the blood supply and pushes the hair shaft up. The catagen phase can last several weeks.
    • Telogen phase. During this resting stage, which lasts about five months, there is no hair growth. At the end of the telogen phase, the hair sheds, and the follicle starts to grow a new one. At any moment, about 90% of the hair follicles of the scalp are growing hairs in the anagen phase, while only about 10% are in the resting phase.
  • Everyone loses hair every day. Seeing hair in your drain or on your brush is not a cause for panic: most folks who don’t suffer from visible hair loss still shed between 50-100 hairs each day.
  • Hair loss is a problem for tens of millions of Americans. While we all lose hair daily, those who suffer from hair loss lose substantially more than that, leading to thinning hair, receding hairlines, and baldness. The numbers tell the story:
    • 35 million American men suffer from hair loss
    • 21 million American women experience hair loss
    • By the age of 35, two-thirds of American men have some degree of appreciable hair loss, and by age 50, around 85% of men have significantly thinning hair.
    • Androgenetic alopecia, commonly known as male pattern baldness, is responsible for over 95% of hair loss in men.
    • Approximately 25% of men who have male pattern baldness start losing their hair before they turn 21 years old.
  • Hair loss is not all your mom’s fault. Perhaps the biggest misconception about hair loss is that you inherit it from your mom’s side of the family. While your hair’s strength and vitality are, in fact, mostly a matter of genetics, the genes which play a role in hair loss come from many places, including your dad’s side of the family. This “polygenic” basis for hair loss means that you should examine all the branches of your family tree if you want to see into your hair loss future.

Schedule a Hair Loss Evaluation Today at The Miami Hair Institute

At the Miami Hair Institute, know the facts about hair loss and how to treat it. We evaluate each hair loss patient with a comprehensive and proven methodology so that we can determine the underlying cause of your hair loss and propose the optimal course of treatment. To schedule your personalized hair loss evaluation and begin your hair restoration journey, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Hair Loss vs. Hair Shedding

Hair Loss vs. Hair Shedding

When you walk out of your front door, that doesn’t mean you’re never coming back. Similarly, if you notice increasing amounts of hair stuck in your brush or the drain, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you are suffering from permanent hair loss. Not all hair that falls out never comes back. Sometimes, hair falling out – hair shedding – is a temporary phenomenon that is no cause for concern. Other times, however, it can indicate a chronic hair loss condition in which hair loss is permanent. Knowing the difference between hair shedding and hair loss can help determine what, if anything, you can and should do to address the issue.

Hair Shedding

As a preliminary matter, even folks who seemingly have full, robust heads of hair lose between 50 to 100 hairs a day on average. This amount of hair shedding is normal, expected, and part of the regular hair growth cycle. But physical changes, life events, and lifestyle choices can cause hair to shed at a significantly higher rate.

These issues can lead to a condition called telogen effluvium in which hair follicles are shocked into a resting state. Since the follicles stop actively producing more hair to replace normal shedding, the thinning tends to happen in a diffuse pattern throughout the scalp. If the factors causing the shedding can be addressed and resolved, the follicles often return to their normal healthy state and fully regrow without treatment or surgical intervention.

Common reasons for temporary hair shedding include:

  • Excessive stress
  • Extreme weight loss
  • Childbirth
  • Menopause
  • Hormonal imbalances
  • Prescription medication
  • Recent surgery
  • Stopping birth control pills

Hair Loss

As opposed to shedding, hair loss involves conditions that stop hair from growing entirely. By an overwhelming margin, pattern baldness – androgenetic alopecia – is the most common cause of hair loss. Over 95 percent of hair loss cases involve this hereditary hair loss condition that affects over three million Americans each year. Androgenetic alopecia causes hair miniaturization, a phenomenon in which follicles become thinner and finer each time they go through the hair growth cycle. Eventually, those follicles will die and fall out.

Another common cause of hair loss is alopecia areata, which is a hair loss condition that involves a direct assault on your hair follicles by your own immune system and white blood cells. This attack shrinks the follicles and subsequently slows down hair growth. In turn, this leads to sudden hair loss in quarter-sized patches that can progress across the scalp rapidly and unpredictably.

If you apply constant tension to your hair follicles, they will eventually experience damage, weaken, and ultimately die and fall out. This is called traction alopecia.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Common Scalp Problems: How To Treat Them

Scalp Care: How to Maintain Healthy Hair

You can’t plant a beautiful garden in rocky, dry soil. Your flowers will die unless you ensure that they have the water and sunshine they need. Think of your scalp like the garden in which your hair grows. If your scalp is unhealthy, it can have a direct and significant impact on your hair health. If you already struggle with hair loss, tending to the health of your scalp can slow down shedding and keep the hair you still have strong and resilient.

Here are six ways you can take care of your scalp so your scalp can take care of your hair:

  1. Increase your protein intake. Hair needs a sufficient amount of protein to grow. Make sure you eat plenty of protein-rich foods like fish, beef, and eggs, as well as are beans, lentils, and soy.
  2. Reduce your stress level. Stress can negatively affect your health in a host of ways, including damaging your hair follicles. When your body overproduces hormones such as cortisol as a reaction to stress, it can lead to adrenal fatigue. In turn, the overproduction of stress-related hormones causes a corresponding drop in levels of other hair-critical hormones like aldosterone and androgens, causing hair to weaken and ultimately fall out. Find ways of alleviating stress that work best for you.
  3. Get more sleep. If you don’t get enough sleep, it will catch up to you. Our bodies use a lot of energy every day and won’t work as they’re supposed to if they don’t have a chance to recharge. One function that won’t work as well as it should is the repair and regeneration of hair follicles. Insufficient sleep gets in the way of this process, causing hair to stop growing, weaken, and eventually fall out more than it would if you got enough rest.
  4. Eat a healthy, balanced diet. To stop and avoid hair loss, be sure to eat a well-rounded diet rich in protein, biotin, vitamin E, vitamin A, and other essential nutrients.
  5. Keep hydrated. Water is as vital to healthy hair as it is to healthy plants and flowers. Hair shafts are composed of approximately 25 percent water, and dehydration weakens those shafts. Make an affirmative effort to drink lots of fluids – at least 64 ounces of water per day –  so you can keep your thirsty hair from drying out.
  6. Wear scalp sunscreen. Balding individuals or those with thinning hair are particularly vulnerable to sunburn on the scalp. Too much sun can turn your hair brittle, dry, and more prone to breaks and splits. Additionally, sunburn on the scalp can not only be the result of having areas of thinning or absent hair, but it can also cause hair loss, at least temporarily. Protect your scalp with scalp sunscreen or a hat, especially in the summer.

Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

If you are concerned about your hair loss and are ready to do something about it, we invite you to schedule a hair loss evaluation at the Miami Hair Institute. Drs. Nusbaum and Rose are internationally acclaimed hair restoration surgeons with more than 40 years of combined experience. To receive a personalized evaluation and hair restoration plan, contact us online or call our office at 305-925-0222.

5 Benefits of an FUE Hair Transplant

How Hormones Impact Hair Loss

Beyond making teenagers moody and difficult to live with, hormones perform a host of vital roles in our growth, health, and well-being. Life-events and the passage of time will cause our bodies’ to produce different amounts of hormones throughout our lives. Some people, however, can either produce too many or too few hormones, and when that happens, it can have negative impacts throughout the body, including on hair growth. 

Hormone imbalances are the cause behind or contribute to many cases of hair loss. The good news is that there are medications and other treatments that can restore balance to hormone levels and stop hair loss caused by an excess or insufficient amount of them.

Multiple hormones play roles in the strength, growth, and health of our hair. The most common types of hormone imbalances and related issues that often contribute to hair shedding and loss include:

  • Thyroid imbalances. Both hypothyroidism (too few thyroid hormones) and hyperthyroidism (too many) can contribute to hair loss through their impact on the production of a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT). A synthesized version of testosterone, DHT is a key hormone in sexual development and physical appearance. If too much testosterone is converted into DHT, it disrupts the natural growth cycle of hair. In turn, this causes the hair follicles to shrink, ultimately resulting in thinning hair and shedding.
  • Menopause.  Menopausal women produce lower levels of two hormones critical for hair growth and follicle health: estrogen and progesterone. As the supply of these two hormones decreases, hair growth slows and follicles become thin, brittle, and more susceptible to damage. Making matters worse, this decrease in hair-promoting hormones comes with an increase in the production of androgens – hormones that trigger follicle miniaturization and make hair more likely to fall out.
  • Postpartum hair loss.  Also called postpartum alopecia – hair loss after childbirth is a common issue. Up to 90 percent of new mothers have some degree of hair loss in the first three to five months after their child is born. During pregnancy, estrogen levels increase the percentage of hairs in the growth cycle, while also freezing hair that is in the resting phase of hair growth. After giving birth, womens’ estrogen levels fall dramatically, and all the hair that was growing so beautifully starts to fall out.
  • Insulin Resistance. When the body fails to regulate insulin production properly, the body can build up a resistance to this hormone, which can, in turn, lead to an increased risk of androgenetic alopecia, or pattern baldness.

Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

If a hormone imbalance is contributing to hair loss, the Miami Hair Institute can help. We offer a range of effective treatments, customized to your individual condition. To receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Can You Predict Hair Loss?

To see into the future, you often have to look at the past. That is certainly true when it comes to predicting whether you will experience hair loss. While genetics isn’t the only factor that will determine the likelihood of you losing your hair, the odds are pretty good that if your family history includes baldness, the same issue may be in store for you. Pattern baldness, also called androgenetic alopecia, is a hereditary hair loss condition responsible for 95% of hair loss cases.

But when you look around at your next family gathering (which will happen soon, hopefully) and you see a balding parent, grandparent, uncle, or aunt, does that necessarily mean you will suffer the same fate?

The truth is that not all relatives are created equal when trying to determine if you are genetically predisposed to pattern baldness.  For men, their maternal grandfather and their dad will be the ones who can give them an idea of what to expect from their hair as the years go by. 

Many of the genes responsible for baldness and hair loss tend to come from your maternal grandfather, even though genes from both of your parents and all of your grandparents can also play a role. If your maternal grandfather is bald or is losing their hair, you are a likely candidate for hair loss problems yourself.

The reason that a man’s mother’s father’s genes play an oversized role in predicting hair loss is that men only have one set of X chromosome genes, as opposed to two sets of autosomal genes. For the latter, men can have one set that causes baldness and one that doesn’t, giving them a moderate chance of losing their hair. However, since men only have that single set of x chromosome genes, which they share with their maternal grandfather, a baldness-related gene will be the only one around, and that means a much higher risk of developing androgenetic alopecia.

Call the Miami Hair Institute Today For Your Androgenetic Alopecia Evaluation

While looking at your genetic heritage will give you some clues as to what to expect will happen on your scalp over the years ahead, it is not definitive or a foregone conclusion. Researchers are still studying the interaction of various genetic and other factors that contribute to hair loss. But one thing we do know for sure: we now have plentiful options for addressing hair loss caused by androgenetic alopecia. Advancements in medicine, technology, and techniques have made hair restoration more available, more effective, and more convenient than ever before.

At the Miami Hair Institute, we pride ourselves on offering the most innovative approaches to hair restoration, and our surgeons are world-renowned experts in hair transplant surgery and other treatments.

Schedule an appointment with the Miami Hair Institute today by calling 305.925.0222.

prevent male pattern baldness

Types of Alopecia

Androgenetic alopecia – also called pattern baldness – is by far the most common cause of hair loss in men and women alike. But it is far from the only reason your hair may be thinning or falling out. Millions of Americans suffer from hair loss caused by other forms of alopecia every year. While each type of alopecia has its own causes and impacts, they all lead to the same disappointing and embarrassing issues inherent with losing your hair.

Here is what you need to know about some of the most common types of alopecia.

Androgenetic Alopecia

If your hair is thinning or falling out, the odds are pretty good that androgenetic alopecia is the culprit. Over 95% of hair loss cases are related to this hereditary hair loss condition that affects over three million Americans annually. Androgenetic alopecia causes hair miniaturization, where hair becomes thinner and finer each time it goes through the growth cycle. Eventually, these hairs cease to grow entirely and fall out.

Men are more likely to experience and notice androgenetic alopecia earlier than women, with 25 percent of American males seeing symptoms before age 21, approximately 66 percent of men showing some degree of loss by the age of 35, and 85 percent of men see significant thinning by age 50. Most women, however, do not notice or see any signs of thinning or balding hair until the age of 50 or 60.  

Alopecia Areata

This hair loss condition is caused by a direct attack on hair follicles by your own immune system and white blood cells. This assault causes the follicles to shrink and subsequently slow down hair production. In turn, this leads to sudden hair loss in quarter-sized patches which can progress across the scalp rapidly and unpredictably.

More extreme versions of the condition include alopecia totalis (Complete loss of hair on the scalp) and alopecia universalis (total loss of hair on the scalp and body). Hair follicles are not destroyed by alopecia areata and can typically regrow as soon as the inflammation dwindles.

Though not as common as androgenetic alopecia, which is the culprit in the vast majority of male pattern baldness cases, alopecia areata still affects two percent of Americans or roughly 6.8 million people. Unlike hereditary hair loss, which generally manifests later in life, alopecia areata typically occurs before the age of 30 and can sometimes be seen in children as young as two years old.

Researchers haven’t yet figured out the specific reason why the immune system would suddenly turn on hair follicles. However, there appears to be a strong genetic connection. Several studies have found that alopecia areata is far more common (1 out of 5) in people who have a close family member with the condition.

Traction Alopecia

If you apply constant tension to your hair follicles, they will eventually experience damage, weaken, and ultimately die and fall out. This is called traction alopecia.

The five primary causes of traction alopecia are:

  1. Wearing unnecessarily tight pigtails, ponytails, or braids for extended periods.
  2. Trichotillomania, a psychological disorder characterized by constant (and often unconscious) hair twisting, plucking, or pulling.
  3. Hairstyles that require hair to be tightly wound for a prolonged period.
  4. Hairpieces and weaves that must be affixed/clipped to the hair.
  5. Helmets, particularly compression-helmets like those worn while playing football, snowboarding, skiing, horseback riding, etc.

No Matter The Reason Behind Your Hair Loss, The Miami Hair Institute Can Help

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases no matter what the underlying cause. Through advanced hair restoration surgical techniques, technology, and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering from hair loss regain their hair and self-confidence.

To receive your personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

New Method of Producing Stem Cells Proves Wrong

What is “Hair Banking” & Is It Worth It?

For years, women of childbearing age who face a chronic illness have had the option of freezing, preserving, and “banking” their eggs for later use if their condition prevented them from producing eggs in the future. A similar approach – though one that is far more speculative, unproven, and questionable – is now being promoted for hair restoration.

Specifically, a British company is offering “hair banking.” According to the company, they extract hair follicles from a patient much in the same way follicles are removed in an FUE hair transplant procedure. They will then place those follicles in cryogenic storage. But those follicles supposedly will not just be sitting idle waiting for future transplantation.

The company claims that they can multiply the hairs using unique cells in the follicles called dermal papilla (DP). These cells are found at the base of a hair follicle and work alongside skin surface cells to control the formation of the hair shaft. During the gradual process of hair loss, the DP loses cells which results in the follicles becoming smaller, causing hair to thin and get shorter.

According to the company, when the donor is ready for a hair transplant, the DP-fortified follicles could then be injected back into the scalp, where they will theoretically rejuvenate old hair follicles and generate new ones.

A Risky Bet

The key word is theoretically. While the technology certainly exists to extract and preserve hair follicles for later use, the ability to clone and multiply DP cells in a way that they can be effectively used to treat hair loss remains underdeveloped and unproven. That means the underlying premise behind hair banking is one that counts on future medical and technological advances that may or may not come to pass.

In this sense, hair banking shares some similarities to the now-debunked practice of cryonics, where people who die from a chronic illness have their bodies frozen in the hope that one day, science and medicine will come up with the cure for whatever disease or condition led to their death.

If you are ready to place a bet on hair banking, you also need to be prepared to wager a significant amount of money on that bet. But at present, hair banking is a risky proposition with questionable odds.

Resolve Your Hair Loss Issues With Proven and Effective Solutions Today

Individuals who are currently suffering from hair loss have plenty of proven, effective, and reliable options for hair restoration that can give them full, natural-looking hair today. At the Miami Hair & Skin Institute, our world-renowned hair restoration physicians offer a wide range of surgical and non-surgical options for addressing hair loss.

If you are ready to do something about your hair loss, please schedule a personal evaluation at the Miami Hair & Skin Institute. Contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Hair Transplant Repairs vs. Reversals: What’s the Difference?

Most of the hair transplant patients we see at the Miami Hair Institute are undergoing the procedure for the first time. Our goal is to make it their last time as well, leaving them with full, natural-looking hair and exceeding their expectations as to what hair transplant surgery can accomplish. Unfortunately, however, many patients come to us after undergoing a transplant somewhere else that fell far short of their expectations, leaving them with a sloppy and obvious hair transplant or with visible and unsightly scars. These patients desperately look to us to fix things, and we endeavor to do so in one of two ways: hair transplant repair and hair transplant reversal.

Hair Transplant Repair

Hair transplant repair involves working with a previously but poorly performed transplant to get the patient results close to what they originally expected. It can also include work to conceal either the obviousness of their transplant or scars from their earlier procedure.

Problems with earlier surgery that often lead people to undergo a hair transplant repair include:

  • Large or poorly transplanted hair grafts to the frontal hairline that look like “hair plugs” or “doll hair”
  • A frontal hairline placed too far forward
  • Transplanted hair set in the incorrect direction
  • Scarring in the donor areas of the scalp

If the problem is with unnatural looking “hair plugs,” we can often remove them, dissect them into smaller grafts, and then re-transplant the hairs into the scalp. We may also recommend undergoing a new follicular unit extraction (FUE) procedure so we can obtain additional donor hairs that we can transplant to the recipient area. This can further increase the full, natural look of the transplant. We can also use FUE to camouflage scars by transplanting hair to areas where scarring has occurred.

Hair Transplant Reversal

If the goal of hair transplant repair is to make things look like they should have after the initial surgery, the purpose of a hair transplant reversal is to make it look like the patient never had hair transplant surgery in the first place. This can involve the same techniques described above.

Hair transplant repair and reversal procedures can undoubtedly improve the results of a prior operation. But they still may not achieve the goals you had for your initial surgery. That is one reason why it is so critical to get things right the first time. Whether you are seeing us for your first hair transplant or are looking to us to improve the results of a previous one, our goal is always the same: to provide you with an exceptional patient experience and hair transplant results that leave you beyond satisfied.

Call the Miami Hair Institute Today to Learn More About Hair Transplant Repair or Reversal

At the Miami Hair Institute, our world-renowned hair transplant surgeons can help you after other doctors have failed or underperformed in their hair restoration efforts.

To learn more about hair transplant repair or reversal and to receive a personalized evaluation and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

Privacy Settings
We use cookies to enhance your experience while using our website. If you are using our Services via a browser you can restrict, block or remove cookies through your web browser settings. We also use content and scripts from third parties that may use tracking technologies. You can selectively provide your consent below to allow such third party embeds. For complete information about the cookies we use, data we collect and how we process them, please check our Privacy Policy
Youtube
Consent to display content from Youtube
Vimeo
Consent to display content from Vimeo
Google Maps
Consent to display content from Google