Articles Tagged with: anemia

What Your Hair Can Tell You About Your Health

If you want to get a complete picture of your health, you’ll need a comprehensive physical exam, an array of tests, and the expertise of your doctor. But medical charts and lab results are not the only places you can get insights about your well-being. Your body has plenty of ways of telling you if something may be wrong. One way it does so is through the condition of your scalp and hair.

Often, differences in your’s hair’s condition don’t mean much beyond the fact that your genes or other environmental or lifestyle factors are causing you to lose hair. Other times, though, sudden or unexpected changes in your hair health – from differences in strength, texture, or color to significant shedding – can be early warning signs about other health problems that need your attention.

The following are just a few things your scalp and hair may be telling you about your health:

  • Dandruff merely is a visible sign that the skin cells on your scalp are producing new cells quicker than normal, resulting in excessive shedding of dead skin cells, which take the form of dandruff flakes. Dandruff can be connected to a variety of treatable conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, stress, seborrheic dermatitis, or vitamin B deficiency.
  • Graying hair. While greying hair is usually the result of genetics and the passing of time, premature greying can be caused by an array of health problems, from stress to anemia, thyroid issues, vitamin B12 deficiency, and vitiligo.
  • Brittle hair. A rare condition call Cushing’s Syndrome can develop when your body is exposed to high levels of the hormone cortisol for an extended time. One symptom of this condition is brittle hair.
  • Thyroid problems. When our thyroid glands don’t work correctly, they can cause an array of health problems, including hair loss. Both hypothyroidism (production of too few hormones) and hyperthyroidism (production of too many hormones) can cause hair to fall out because of the impact these imbalances have on the development of a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT). This hormone, a synthesized version of testosterone, plays a role in the development of sexual organs and secondary sexual characteristics, including physical appearance. Unlike testosterone, however, too much DHT disrupts the natural growth cycle of hair and can cause hair follicle shrinkage or elimination, resulting in shedding or thinning hair.
  • A lack of iron – anemia – is one of the chief causes of dietary-related hair loss. Low iron levels restrict proper blood flow – reducing the amount of growth-stimulating nutrients our follicles need. Iron-rich foods such as spinach, kale, broccoli, and other leafy greens can boost your iron intake and help feed your hair.

Ready to Do Something About Your Hair Loss? Schedule an Appointment for a Hair Loss Evaluation Today

If you are concerned about your hair health or are experiencing hair loss and you’re ready to do something about it, we invite you to schedule a hair loss evaluation at the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami. To receive your personalized assessment and treatment plan, contact us online or call our office directly at 305-925-0222.

How Your Diet Encourages Hair Growth

Foods For Healthy HairPhysical characteristics, including hair, is often representative of your internal wellbeing. When you lack the nutrients necessary to keep your body performing properly, certain functions shut down. Patients suffering from temporary hair loss due a stressful event or dietary shift, a condition called telogen effluvium, should reevaluate their nutrition. All hair loss patients looking to stimulate regrowth can lead a healthier lifestyle to boost the effects of alternative restoration methods, such as surgery or low-level laser therapy (LLLT).

If you tend to eat high amounts of empty calories (i.e. junk food) and now notice thinning or shedding, you’re likely missing these key nutrients:

Protein

Proteins and their amino acids are known as the building blocks of the body. Like their effects on muscles, proteins keep hair long, strong and soft. Protein-rich foods include chicken, turkey, fish, eggs and low-fat dairy products. Legumes and nuts are viable protein alternatives for individuals on a vegetarian or vegan diet. Try to allocate 30 percent of your caloric intake toward proteins for a well-balanced diet.

Omega-3

Unfortunately, the human body does not produce omega-3 fatty acids on its own. We obtain these solely through food, which makes consuming substances rich in fatty acids essential to overall vigor. For hair health, these oils keep the scalp hydrated to stimulate follicle function while enriching strands for a shinier glow. Foods such as salmon, sardines, trout, avocado and pumpkin seeds are great resources for boosting your omega-3 intake.

Iron

Did you know lacking iron is one of the chief causes of dietary-related hair loss? Anemia, defined by insufficient iron levels in the body, is a serious problem that triggers hair loss. Low iron levels limit proper blood flow – something follicles need to receive growth-stimulating nutrients. Iron is found in red meats, fish, broccoli, kale, chicken and leafy greens.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C acts as a catalyst for iron to absorb into the blood stream. Eating these two hair boosting nutrients together fosters hair growth. In addition, the antioxidants found in Vitamin C, along with its collagen-boosting properties, keep skin, hair and nails looking and feeling nourished. Many refreshing fruits, such as oranges, strawberries and blueberries, contain high levels of Vitamin C necessary for hair growth.  

Vitamin E

Vitamin E protects your skin and hair from environmental pollutants and sun damage. You can incorporate vitamin E into your diet by eating more almonds, spinach, avocados, sunflower seeds and butternut squash. Alternatively, you can apply vitamin E oil topically.

Biotin

You’re probably familiar with taking biotin supplements for healthy hair and nails. As a B vitamin, biotin helps strengthen locks to avoid breakage and fall. While supplements can easily up your biotin consumption, try incorporating egg yolks, yeast and whole grains for additional nutritive benefits.

 

Often, a dietary change isn’t enough to regrow lost locks. At the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami, our skilled physicians diagnose and treat hair loss cases that can’t be reversed at home. Through advanced hair restoration surgery techniques and alternative non-invasive treatments, we can help patients suffering with hair loss. To schedule a consultation, call us directly at 877-443-9070.

Causes of Hair Loss in Women

Causes of Hair Loss in WomenThe causes of hair loss in women may differ from those in men due to a number of factors, most significant of which is biology.  One of the biggest biological differences between men and women are hormones.  Hormones like testosterone, estrogen, and thyroid, to name only a few, largely dictate the outward appearance of both males and females.  This includes height, weight, and of course, hair.  Other causes of hair loss in women include genetics, nutrient deficiencies, and general health of the skin (in particular, the scalp).  This article has been created to help women identify the 6 most common causes of hair loss including thinning, shedding, and balding.

Top 6 Causes of Hair Loss in Women

1. Unhealthy Scalp

It comes as no surprise that certain scalp conditions may be causal factors for hair loss.  The scalp is the foundation from which healthy hair grows, and growth may be inhibited when the foundation is compromised.  Specifically, the following skin conditions may lead to hair loss in women:

  • Seborrheic dermatitis:  This condition makes may agitate the skin of the scalp, face, and torso.  When affecting the scalp, most individuals know this condition by the name dandruff.
  • Psoriasis: An autoimmune disease, psoriasis appears in the form of scaly red and white patches on the upper most layer of skin.
  • Dermatophytosis: Known by the common name ringworm, dermatophytosis is caused by a fungal infection and appears as a light red circular mark on the skin.

2. Thyroid Disorder

Thyroid disorders are relatively common among American adults, affecting a reported 5 percent of the population.  Thyroid disorders come in one of two varieties:  Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.  Both hypo- and hyperthyroidism may contribute to hair loss in women.  In the case of the former, the body under-produces the thyroid hormone and individuals may notice weight gain, persistent feelings of fatigue, and a general inability to concentrate.  Hyperthyroidism, on the other hand, is marked by an over-production of thyroid hormone that may cause other side effects like rapid weight loss, muscle atrophy, and irritability.

3. Telogen Effluvium

Another common cause of hair loss in women is telogen effluvium.  This disorder is characterized by unnatural thinning or shedding of the hair and is most commonly triggered by periods of immense or abrupt body stress.  Women who are pregnant, experiencing extreme weight loss, or feeling persistent mental/emotional stress may develop this scalp condition in which hair spends an abnormally short amount of time in the growing portion of the hair growth cycle.  This causes hair to enter the telogen phase (shedding phase) more quickly than is normal, increasing the rate at which hair is expelled from the scalp.

4. Androgenetic alopecia

The American Academy of Dermatology has named androgenetic alopecia as the most common cause of hair loss among both men and women.  Androgenetic alopecia is hereditary; the “gene for hair loss” may be passed down from parent to child.  Contrary to popular hair loss myths, androgenetic alopecia may be inherited from either the mother’s or father’s side of the family.

5. Alopecia Areata

Alopecia areata affects an estimated 4-5 million Americans, making this condition a very common reason for hair loss among women.  Though the precise cause of alopecia areata is not known, women who suffer with unhealthy amounts of stress or general illness are most susceptible to developing the condition.

6. Anemia

Anemia is caused be an iron deficiency in the blood.  This is marked by a low level of red blood cells and may be the result of a diet that is significantly lacking in iron rich foods like egg yolks, dark green vegetables, lentils, and artichokes, among others.  Anemia is also characterized by extreme fatigue and pale skin, as a low blood cell count renders the blood unable to transport adequate amounts of oxygen.

Learn More About Preventing Hair Loss

Early detection is the best means of identifying, treating, and overcoming hair loss.  To learn more, please visit our quick-reference guide titled Women and Hair Loss: Top 4 Signs.  If you are experiencing thinning, balding, or shedding hair, you are not alone.  A reported 20 million women suffer with hair loss in America alone, and there is a wealth of treatment options available.

Our clinic proudly represents the top team Florida hair transplant surgeons, lead by Dr. Bernard Nusbaum and .  To learn more, please schedule a hair loss consultation with the Hair Transplant Institute of Miami or call toll free 1-877-443-9070.

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